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Purple Cow was the #1 bestselling marketing book on Amazon in 2003. Now in Free Prize Inside, Seth Godin is back with practical advice on how to put Purple Cow thinking to work inside your organization (big or small, profit or non) to MAKE SOMETHING HAPPEN. The next big marketing idea is a proven strategy for making your products or services so remarkable that they practic Purple Cow was the #1 bestselling marketing book on Amazon in 2003. Now in Free Prize Inside, Seth Godin is back with practical advice on how to put Purple Cow thinking to work inside your organization (big or small, profit or non) to MAKE SOMETHING HAPPEN. The next big marketing idea is a proven strategy for making your products or services so remarkable that they practically sell themselves. Purple Cow taught marketers the value of standing out from the herd, which is how companies like Krispy Kreme and JetBlue made it big. But it left readers hungry for more: How do you actually think up new Purple Cows? And how do you get them adopted by risk-averse Brown Cow companies? Free Prize Inside delivers those answers and much more. It’s a fun guide to doing innovative marketing that really works when the traditional approaches have all stopped working. Thirty years ago, the best way to sell something was to advertise it on television. But today’s consumers are cynical, and your product or service had better be more than just hype and clever advertising. Even better, it ought to come with a market-changing innovation—a free prize inside. You don’t have to spend a fortune to create something cool that virtually sells itself. Think of simple but powerful innovations like the Tupperware party, Flintstones vitamins, G.I. Joe (a doll just for boys), Lucille Roberts (a gym just for women), and frequent flier miles. Free Prize Inside will teach you how to create those kinds of blockbusters at your own company without a bunch of MBA-brainwashed marketers. You don’t have to be a genius—you just need curiosity, initiative, and a strategy for overcoming resistance when you champion your idea. We’re all marketers now, no matter what our job titles. With Godin’s help, we can find the free prize that will transform our companies.


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Purple Cow was the #1 bestselling marketing book on Amazon in 2003. Now in Free Prize Inside, Seth Godin is back with practical advice on how to put Purple Cow thinking to work inside your organization (big or small, profit or non) to MAKE SOMETHING HAPPEN. The next big marketing idea is a proven strategy for making your products or services so remarkable that they practic Purple Cow was the #1 bestselling marketing book on Amazon in 2003. Now in Free Prize Inside, Seth Godin is back with practical advice on how to put Purple Cow thinking to work inside your organization (big or small, profit or non) to MAKE SOMETHING HAPPEN. The next big marketing idea is a proven strategy for making your products or services so remarkable that they practically sell themselves. Purple Cow taught marketers the value of standing out from the herd, which is how companies like Krispy Kreme and JetBlue made it big. But it left readers hungry for more: How do you actually think up new Purple Cows? And how do you get them adopted by risk-averse Brown Cow companies? Free Prize Inside delivers those answers and much more. It’s a fun guide to doing innovative marketing that really works when the traditional approaches have all stopped working. Thirty years ago, the best way to sell something was to advertise it on television. But today’s consumers are cynical, and your product or service had better be more than just hype and clever advertising. Even better, it ought to come with a market-changing innovation—a free prize inside. You don’t have to spend a fortune to create something cool that virtually sells itself. Think of simple but powerful innovations like the Tupperware party, Flintstones vitamins, G.I. Joe (a doll just for boys), Lucille Roberts (a gym just for women), and frequent flier miles. Free Prize Inside will teach you how to create those kinds of blockbusters at your own company without a bunch of MBA-brainwashed marketers. You don’t have to be a genius—you just need curiosity, initiative, and a strategy for overcoming resistance when you champion your idea. We’re all marketers now, no matter what our job titles. With Godin’s help, we can find the free prize that will transform our companies.

30 review for Free Prize Inside!: The Next Big Marketing Idea

  1. 5 out of 5

    Laura Noggle

    My 9th Seth Godin book—they all contain valuable nuggets. This one was relatively short and sweet, and even though it was published in 2004, there are still great insights/reminders. “You can keep waiting to get plucked from obscurity, or you can learn how to champion your project one person at a time.” “Differentiation is a zero-sum, advertising-based game.” Looking forward to reading every book Godin has written!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Dane Cobain

    Seth Godin’s books are always enlightening, and this one is no different – here, Godin explains how the classic idea of a free prize inside a box of cereal was often enough to make customers pick your brand over your competitors, even if that free prize was of a low value. According to Godin, you can make people feel the same way about your product or service, no matter what it is – he raises a good point, too. The good thing about reading Seth Godin is that his style of writing is conversational Seth Godin’s books are always enlightening, and this one is no different – here, Godin explains how the classic idea of a free prize inside a box of cereal was often enough to make customers pick your brand over your competitors, even if that free prize was of a low value. According to Godin, you can make people feel the same way about your product or service, no matter what it is – he raises a good point, too. The good thing about reading Seth Godin is that his style of writing is conversational and informative at the same time – it’s not hard to take in the lessons that he has to offer, and you can apply them to your own business straight away. You don’t even need to be running a business – with a bit of thought and experimentation, you could apply the same lessons to any of your endeavors. Perhaps even your book review site? Godin calls the free gift “the next big marketing idea”, and I’m not too sure that that’s accurate – that said, this was first published ten years ago back in 2004, and a lot has changed since then. This might not be the next big thing, but it’s certainly a concept that’s here to stay and which you can apply straight away for immediate results.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jeridel Banks

    Upping my game with a free prize from the library!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nathan

    The only way to win in business is to become remarkable. That was the message of Purple Cow: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable. But how do you make a purple cow? That's what this short book is about. According to Seth Godin, he had to write this follow-up because business was all wrong in how they were going about their search for a purple cow. They were seeking the big. Big innovations. Big marketing campaigns. But a Purple Cow is much more likely to be a small, soft innovation that cu The only way to win in business is to become remarkable. That was the message of Purple Cow: Transform Your Business by Being Remarkable. But how do you make a purple cow? That's what this short book is about. According to Seth Godin, he had to write this follow-up because business was all wrong in how they were going about their search for a purple cow. They were seeking the big. Big innovations. Big marketing campaigns. But a Purple Cow is much more likely to be a small, soft innovation that customers love - a Free Prize inside their offering. Writes Godin, "Most free prizes have two essential elements in common. First, they are the thing about your service, your product or your organization that's worth remarking on. Something worth seeking out and buying...Second, most free prizes are not about what the person needs. Instead, they satisfy our wants. They are fashionable or fun or surprising or delightful or sad. They rarely deliver more of what we were buying in the first place." As I was reading this, it became obvious that one of the most obvious free prizes is customer experience. It's not more of the product or service. It's something unexpected during the delivery of the product or service. Something that's worth remarking on. And late in the book, Godin gives a fitting example. He tells the story of his interaction with Jose who worked in a taco shop in the Denver airport. What was remarkable about this interaction? Jose chatted with Godin for an extra minute while he ordered, got him a special condiment from the back. Later, he asked Godin how his meal was. In other words, Godin had a great experience with Jose. And as he points out, the cost of that experience was zero, but the value to Godin was "enormous." Your customer experience can be a free prize for your guests. It can cost you nothing while delivering enormous value.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mihai Rosca

    Following Seth Godin's Purple Cow, comes a lesson in how to champion your cow (idea) and how to paint it purple. When I finished The Purple Cow, I wanted to find out how you should make it and this book came as a logical sequel to it. What I like most about this book is that it's more practical than other books by the same author. Another strong point? It leads you by the hand to the bookstore but then lets you choose your own knowledge and encourages you to think for yourself. But what makes it Following Seth Godin's Purple Cow, comes a lesson in how to champion your cow (idea) and how to paint it purple. When I finished The Purple Cow, I wanted to find out how you should make it and this book came as a logical sequel to it. What I like most about this book is that it's more practical than other books by the same author. Another strong point? It leads you by the hand to the bookstore but then lets you choose your own knowledge and encourages you to think for yourself. But what makes it very useful is that it teaches you how to champion an idea inside your company, especially if you work in a corporation. For a person like me who does not like doing politics, that was so valuable! Not to mention that, if you manage to like, go through the process 2 or 3 times, that pretty much means you know how to champion an idea in front of a tough audience. How valuable is that? About as valuable as learning how to pitch in The Shark Tank and win 4/5 times. The book then goes on with edge crafting [I just love the way this man creates his own jargon]. He explains how you can put a little free prize inside everything, enough to make your product remarkable and to keep the client coming back with more friends. It's something he calls soft innovation. Anyway, enough spoilers for now, enjoy the free prize inside!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    How to create your free prize to make your product or service remarkable. Edge effects and Communication Channel. if we knew the right answer, would that be enough to solve our problem? which edges are working for unrelated organizations? could we get closer to the edge? how do we make our product or service public, not private? is it really remarkable? Find a product or service that is completely unrelated to your industry figure out who is winning by being remarkable discover which edge they went to do How to create your free prize to make your product or service remarkable. Edge effects and Communication Channel. if we knew the right answer, would that be enough to solve our problem? which edges are working for unrelated organizations? could we get closer to the edge? how do we make our product or service public, not private? is it really remarkable? Find a product or service that is completely unrelated to your industry figure out who is winning by being remarkable discover which edge they went to do that in your own industry

  7. 5 out of 5

    Inka Partanen

    Seth Godin knows his stuff but this book felt like a book written in a hurry. Perhaps it was the publisher requesting new pages... I really liked some of the ideas but they were introduced and finished so quickly that there was no time to process. Moreover, the examples were mostly too ”big” (companies, businesses, products) that it was hard to relate to them. And of course the time has changed - I laughed at the example about CD-roms. What were they anyway, I can hardly remember.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Leif Denti

    It's better than Seth Godins first book, Purple Cow, since it actually offers some advice on how to think and act in order to find those free prizes/purple cows. You needn't read Purple Cow if you plan to pick up this. It's better than Seth Godins first book, Purple Cow, since it actually offers some advice on how to think and act in order to find those free prizes/purple cows. You needn't read Purple Cow if you plan to pick up this.

  9. 5 out of 5

    David Dollar

    This is a sorta sequel to Godin's "Purple Cow", all about coming up with the "next great ideas in marketing". "Free Prize Inside" continues that theme, with ideas of extras on those new ideas. This might be my favorite Seth Godin book. Loved it. This is a sorta sequel to Godin's "Purple Cow", all about coming up with the "next great ideas in marketing". "Free Prize Inside" continues that theme, with ideas of extras on those new ideas. This might be my favorite Seth Godin book. Loved it.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Nick O'Brien

    Loved it, soft innovations are the underrated.

  11. 4 out of 5

    K.M.

    I have liked other of Seth's books more, but this one was still worth reading. I have liked other of Seth's books more, but this one was still worth reading.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Barretto

    Super book on creating a product for your business in a way that stands out from the competition. It's a must read for those in marketing or entrepreneurs looking to boost their business. Super book on creating a product for your business in a way that stands out from the competition. It's a must read for those in marketing or entrepreneurs looking to boost their business.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alanood Almisbah

    Little changes cost you, big changes benefit you.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nick Gaston

    Oldie and a goodie

  15. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Henderson

    A bit dated, but very helpful

  16. 4 out of 5

    Melinda

    Love the ideas, fresh perspective, challenge to create a unique experience or focus for your product.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Georgi Nenov

    Seth Godin is a Marketing God! I totally love his approach towards soft-innovations. This book is a must-read.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rich Baker

    Brilliant read!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rohan R

    I'm basing the review on the value I extricated from this book. I've read some of Seth Godin's other work and I like those a lot more than this book. 'This is marketing' for example, is a great book. I'm basing the review on the value I extricated from this book. I've read some of Seth Godin's other work and I like those a lot more than this book. 'This is marketing' for example, is a great book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Cici suciati

    Love love love this book!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Gordon

    Godin defines a Free Prize as a soft innovation that will make your existing product remarkable, something worth talking about (and spread through word of mouth). The soft innovation is the element that transcends the utility of the original idea and adds a special element worth paying extra, worth remarking about. Consumers don’t insist on the latest technology, we want cool stuff. Design, style, extras, gimmicks, and fun matter. We don't buy the most accurate watch, cleanest vacuum, or use the Godin defines a Free Prize as a soft innovation that will make your existing product remarkable, something worth talking about (and spread through word of mouth). The soft innovation is the element that transcends the utility of the original idea and adds a special element worth paying extra, worth remarking about. Consumers don’t insist on the latest technology, we want cool stuff. Design, style, extras, gimmicks, and fun matter. We don't buy the most accurate watch, cleanest vacuum, or use the most secure bank. As opposed to Purple Cow, the focus is on making modifications to an existing product instead of starting from scratch. Godin provides tips to help iterate your product to find secondary attributes that excite consumers. The tips focus on making progress without disrupting other departments a company. Examples: Photobooth stickers (photos on a sticker in retail locations), vitamins with Flintstone's licensing, placing non-retail in a mall: H&R Block, waterproofed laptops, throwing a party to sell Tupperware, free coin-counting machine at Commerce banks

  22. 4 out of 5

    Barry Davis

    By the author of Unleashing the ideavirus, purple cow, and others. godin claims that anyone can deliver the next big markeing idea. drawing on the free prize inside crackerjacks as the real product, he cites scores of examples of companies and products that have innovated (for example, the cranium board game is sold at the register in starbucks). first he explains why you need a free prize, claiming that innovation is far cheaper and much more successful than advertising. he then focuses on how By the author of Unleashing the ideavirus, purple cow, and others. godin claims that anyone can deliver the next big markeing idea. drawing on the free prize inside crackerjacks as the real product, he cites scores of examples of companies and products that have innovated (for example, the cranium board game is sold at the register in starbucks). first he explains why you need a free prize, claiming that innovation is far cheaper and much more successful than advertising. he then focuses on how to sell thie idea in your company, giving insights on becoming a “champion” of the innovation and developing support within the company to make it happen. the final section of the book focuses on finding the free prize, working at the “edges”, as he calls it. he cites more and more examples, including a free site www.idea-a-day.com, that emails you a new idea every day of the year for free. godin says that “edgecraft” is relatively simple -- find an edge in some product or service that makes it remarkable, and move your product or service there. once again, he provides pages of edgecraft in all sorts of settings as examples. his counterintuitive advice is disarming, sometimes useless, but often very insightful. For example, godin claims that satisfied customers are your worst enemies, since they never challenge you to innovate. the end of the book as an extensive collection of notes on each chapter, with even more insights and examples. as he told his reader in purple cow, advertising is dead. you need to constantly be recreating ideaviruses that “sneezers” will take out into the street.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Loy Machedo

    Loy Machedo’s Book Review – Free Prize Inside by Seth Godin Just when you thought you understood the pattern Seth Godin uses for all his books, he comes up with once again, another mind rattling concept of Marketing at its secretive best – Free Prize Inside. FPI is a collection of great examples from Jeff Bezos’s Amazon.com decisions to What Cereal Companies have been doing so effectively to Soft Innovations to Good Power Point Tips to how he sold 10,000 of his first book copies easily. The book Loy Machedo’s Book Review – Free Prize Inside by Seth Godin Just when you thought you understood the pattern Seth Godin uses for all his books, he comes up with once again, another mind rattling concept of Marketing at its secretive best – Free Prize Inside. FPI is a collection of great examples from Jeff Bezos’s Amazon.com decisions to What Cereal Companies have been doing so effectively to Soft Innovations to Good Power Point Tips to how he sold 10,000 of his first book copies easily. The book is a great reference point of the realities we face while coming up with ‘another great idea’. And true to his style, Seth Godin follows the Problem / Solution approach to his writing – and yes, in the end his foot notes. The great bits 1) As in the classic style of Seth Godin, very easy to read and you can most probably complete this book in one single sitting. 2) Good analogies, great examples and goofy concepts. 3) Great bonus material in the end (the Notes) The tit-bits Not so much this time round. I noticed that the book was very much in tune with today’s model keeping in mind the future changes that would come. I think the book hit the nail on the head and yes, left me wanting for more. Overall Comment A very good installment in the Seth Godin’s collection of books and yes, very much a worthwhile add-on to the great wisdom of the Bald Egg Head Marketer whom I admire. A book you will read not just once but again. Overall Rating 8 out of 10 Loy Machedo loymachedo.com

  24. 4 out of 5

    Nicholas

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. One of the better seth godin books. Actionable Quotes: "1. There will be more clutter, not less 2. There will be more interaction among consumers, not less 3. There will be more upheaval, more inventions, more technology, and more fashions, not less" "Everyone in the company is in the marketing department." "Go find some people who hate what you've got and who hate what your competitors have but still have a problem they want solved." "Is it going to be successful? Is it worth doing? Is this person able t One of the better seth godin books. Actionable Quotes: "1. There will be more clutter, not less 2. There will be more interaction among consumers, not less 3. There will be more upheaval, more inventions, more technology, and more fashions, not less" "Everyone in the company is in the marketing department." "Go find some people who hate what you've got and who hate what your competitors have but still have a problem they want solved." "Is it going to be successful? Is it worth doing? Is this person able to champion the project?" "Build your reputation as a champion in advance. Denigrate the status quo before you present anything. Find the handles that your audience needs to give them security to believe in the idea." "It's so easy to say, "My boss won't let me." It's even easier to say, "I don't have a good enough idea." Most of the time, neither one is really what's stopping you. You're stopped because you don't have leverage. And you don't have leverage because you didn't build the fulcrum properly." "You win by building constituencies that are afraid of the alternative to supporting your idea." "The free prize is the element that transcends the utility of the original idea and adds a special, unique elements worth paying extra for, worth commenting on." "Just start. Start now. Fail often. Enjoy the ride."

  25. 4 out of 5

    David Martschinske

    We live in a world where advertising just doesn't work like it used to. Our senses are overloaded with company promises, slogans, and schemes that ultimately just turn to white noise. It must be thrilling to work with a guy like Seth Godin. This book highlights his position that soft innovation is the best innovation you can have. "Best" being because it's the simplest, most effective, and YOU can do it without having to spend a million dollars. If you had a guy like Seth Godin working on your t We live in a world where advertising just doesn't work like it used to. Our senses are overloaded with company promises, slogans, and schemes that ultimately just turn to white noise. It must be thrilling to work with a guy like Seth Godin. This book highlights his position that soft innovation is the best innovation you can have. "Best" being because it's the simplest, most effective, and YOU can do it without having to spend a million dollars. If you had a guy like Seth Godin working on your team you could guarantee that he'd find a way to make your company go viral, make your product stick out, and consequently make your profits go up! He admits that it's not for everyone, that obviously there are no marketing techniques that work for EVERY company, but I would be willing to bet that if you're interested in growing your brand this book WILL work for you. The concept is simple... let your product BE the marketing and focus your marketing efforts on making the product "shareable". No amount of advertising dollars can make a consumer WANT to share your product... that desire comes from a truly unique product or service. A truly unique consumer experience is not as difficult to find as you might think. Read any of Seth's books and you'll probably start thinking like a modern-day marketer... not like the MAD MEN of ancient days. ;-)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shinynickel

    A fast read, with little content, but interestingly explained. Worth it, given the amount of time it takes to get through it (a couple of hours at most). Godin argues that most organizations try to make their goods popular via one of two methods - advertising binges, or big technological advances. Both of these are tremendously expensive, and rarely work (though when they do, very successful). Godin points out that if you're an individual marketing dude, you're not going to be able to get one of A fast read, with little content, but interestingly explained. Worth it, given the amount of time it takes to get through it (a couple of hours at most). Godin argues that most organizations try to make their goods popular via one of two methods - advertising binges, or big technological advances. Both of these are tremendously expensive, and rarely work (though when they do, very successful). Godin points out that if you're an individual marketing dude, you're not going to be able to get one of these sorts of projects off the ground - BUT, if you can come up with something smaller that makes your product truly stand out from the rest for being just so out there, then you should focus on doing that. Interestingly, the book breaks down into two how-to parts, with the latter being the less useful "how to come up with an out-there idea for your product" and the more useful being a blunt "the organization will try to destroy and water down your idea to make it safe, here is how to get through the bureaucracy without having that happen". It's a how-to guide with good tips as to how to get a personal project through the various layers that tend to collapse such things, and by far the most useful part of the book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    There is a considerable amount of good information contained within these pages. However, there also is a fair deal of fluff. I normally try to review books as soon as I read, them but this one I completed about a month ago. Sorry to say not much stuck with me, which is never a good sign. Looking back through my dog-eared pages, I did like Godin's thoughts on Edgecraft vs. Brainstorming. Based on his notes in the book, it turns out that people are less productive at coming up with ideas in group There is a considerable amount of good information contained within these pages. However, there also is a fair deal of fluff. I normally try to review books as soon as I read, them but this one I completed about a month ago. Sorry to say not much stuck with me, which is never a good sign. Looking back through my dog-eared pages, I did like Godin's thoughts on Edgecraft vs. Brainstorming. Based on his notes in the book, it turns out that people are less productive at coming up with ideas in groups because they hold back, so brainstorming by yourself is actually a better idea than with other people. This quick read boils down to finding "that thing", that will turn your product from commodity to brand name. What that is, for each product is hard to determine so, Seth suggests you get cracking and start thinking about ways to differentiate other wise you end up as a commodity just like everyone else. I'm still looking for the ATM that spits out a $100 instead of a $20 but, once I find it I'll know it was the product of someone reading this book.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Rosz

    I was planning to read this author's The Big Dip. I found Free Prize Inside instead, selling quite cheaply on eBay, so I started there. Now I'm not sure if I will get to any of his other books. Maybe. His writing style is clear and fairly to the point (although I don't get the annoying end-notes. Anyone like those?) I don't think I have any great criticisms. The first half of the book seemed to deal with working within a company, so perhaps it wasn't very relevant to my situation. The concepts a I was planning to read this author's The Big Dip. I found Free Prize Inside instead, selling quite cheaply on eBay, so I started there. Now I'm not sure if I will get to any of his other books. Maybe. His writing style is clear and fairly to the point (although I don't get the annoying end-notes. Anyone like those?) I don't think I have any great criticisms. The first half of the book seemed to deal with working within a company, so perhaps it wasn't very relevant to my situation. The concepts are obvious, but he is very good at picking them out. One thing I completely disagreed with, but I didn't get the impression this book was about being right. It's a book about having ideas and points to other good ideas people have had. He seems to be saying - sit down and think, have ideas, explore them to the limit and most importantly, have a good product that makes what marketing you do worthwhile.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Anastasia

    If Purple Cow beats you down into the disempowering realization that marketing doesn't work and the only way to get anywhere in business is by making remarkable products, then Free Prize Inside builds you back up into understanding that being remarkable doesn't necessarily have to be expensive or complicated. Full of interesting examples, questions and twists this book should be an essential read for budding entrepreneurs or large businesses alike. Especially when you are about to consider re-bra If Purple Cow beats you down into the disempowering realization that marketing doesn't work and the only way to get anywhere in business is by making remarkable products, then Free Prize Inside builds you back up into understanding that being remarkable doesn't necessarily have to be expensive or complicated. Full of interesting examples, questions and twists this book should be an essential read for budding entrepreneurs or large businesses alike. Especially when you are about to consider re-branding or writing your first business plan or heading into a brainstorming session. I think this book is really kind of a catalyst for brainstorming because it encourages to combine outrageous ideas, to think right on the edges of your industry and even outside of it. Best to be read with a notebook in hand and a few minds put together to put down all the crazy ideas that Godin's examples may spark.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Julian Biddle

    How do you develop an original product? Hard question. Bad question. There are very few products that aren’t derived from some earlier idea. I’m reminded of this daily when I overhear recycled 80s songs being played on the radio. Here’s a question that might get you somewhere : How do you develop a remarkable product? A remarkable product may do the same thing as the competition, but there’s something about it that made you buy it. It may be something remarkable. In the books “Purple cow” and “Free How do you develop an original product? Hard question. Bad question. There are very few products that aren’t derived from some earlier idea. I’m reminded of this daily when I overhear recycled 80s songs being played on the radio. Here’s a question that might get you somewhere : How do you develop a remarkable product? A remarkable product may do the same thing as the competition, but there’s something about it that made you buy it. It may be something remarkable. In the books “Purple cow” and “Free Prize Inside”, the marketing guru Seth Godin shows how a product has to stand out. To stand out it has to go to the “edge” somehow, to stand out from the rest. I really enjoyed the book. I haven't read "Purple Cow" but as far as I tell this book covered the concept well. http://aninspirationalidea.wordpress....

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