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Hegel & the Infinite: Religion, Politics, and Dialectic

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Catherine Malabou, Antonio Negri, John D. Caputo, Bruno Bosteels, Mark C. Taylor, and Slavoj Zizek join seven others--including William Desmond, Katrin Pahl, Adrian Johnston, Edith Wyschogrod, and Thomas A. Lewis--to apply Hegel's thought to twenty-first-century philosophy, politics, and religion. Doing away with claims that the evolution of thought and history is at an en Catherine Malabou, Antonio Negri, John D. Caputo, Bruno Bosteels, Mark C. Taylor, and Slavoj Zizek join seven others--including William Desmond, Katrin Pahl, Adrian Johnston, Edith Wyschogrod, and Thomas A. Lewis--to apply Hegel's thought to twenty-first-century philosophy, politics, and religion. Doing away with claims that the evolution of thought and history is at an end, these thinkers safeguard Hegel's innovations against irrelevance and, importantly, reset the distinction of secular and sacred. These original contributions focus on Hegelian analysis and the transformative value of the philosopher's thought in relation to our current "turn to religion." Malabou develops Hegel's motif of confession in relation to forgiveness; Negri writes of Hegel's philosophy of right; Caputo reaffirms the radical theology made possible by Hegel; and Bosteels critiques fashionable readings of the philosopher and argues against the reducibility of his dialectic. Taylor reclaims Hegel's absolute as a process of infinite restlessness, and Zizek revisits the religious implications of Hegel's concept of letting go. Mirroring the philosopher's own trajectory, these essays progress dialectically through politics, theology, art, literature, philosophy, and science, traversing cutting-edge theoretical discourse and illuminating the ways in which Hegel inhabits them.


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Catherine Malabou, Antonio Negri, John D. Caputo, Bruno Bosteels, Mark C. Taylor, and Slavoj Zizek join seven others--including William Desmond, Katrin Pahl, Adrian Johnston, Edith Wyschogrod, and Thomas A. Lewis--to apply Hegel's thought to twenty-first-century philosophy, politics, and religion. Doing away with claims that the evolution of thought and history is at an en Catherine Malabou, Antonio Negri, John D. Caputo, Bruno Bosteels, Mark C. Taylor, and Slavoj Zizek join seven others--including William Desmond, Katrin Pahl, Adrian Johnston, Edith Wyschogrod, and Thomas A. Lewis--to apply Hegel's thought to twenty-first-century philosophy, politics, and religion. Doing away with claims that the evolution of thought and history is at an end, these thinkers safeguard Hegel's innovations against irrelevance and, importantly, reset the distinction of secular and sacred. These original contributions focus on Hegelian analysis and the transformative value of the philosopher's thought in relation to our current "turn to religion." Malabou develops Hegel's motif of confession in relation to forgiveness; Negri writes of Hegel's philosophy of right; Caputo reaffirms the radical theology made possible by Hegel; and Bosteels critiques fashionable readings of the philosopher and argues against the reducibility of his dialectic. Taylor reclaims Hegel's absolute as a process of infinite restlessness, and Zizek revisits the religious implications of Hegel's concept of letting go. Mirroring the philosopher's own trajectory, these essays progress dialectically through politics, theology, art, literature, philosophy, and science, traversing cutting-edge theoretical discourse and illuminating the ways in which Hegel inhabits them.

30 review for Hegel & the Infinite: Religion, Politics, and Dialectic

  1. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Boerdam

    This collection of essays impressed upon me the divergent ways in which Hegel is interpreted in philosophical circles, and the many different ways thinkers of today are still inspired or angered by this difficult philosopher's work. For some, Hegel seems to be the ultimate rationalist and Enlightenment thinker whose conservative politics and Eurocentrism are things to be overcome, whereas others interpret him as a post-post-modern philosopher whose dialectic out-deconstructs the deconstructionis This collection of essays impressed upon me the divergent ways in which Hegel is interpreted in philosophical circles, and the many different ways thinkers of today are still inspired or angered by this difficult philosopher's work. For some, Hegel seems to be the ultimate rationalist and Enlightenment thinker whose conservative politics and Eurocentrism are things to be overcome, whereas others interpret him as a post-post-modern philosopher whose dialectic out-deconstructs the deconstructionists. I definitely do not know enough about Hegel to understand all of the arguments in this collection or to adjudicate which interpretation is the correct one, but for me the mind-altering contributions by Caputo, Johnston and Zizek made reading this collection more than worthwhile. This is a collection for readers who are already familiar with Hegel and issues surrounding interpretations of his philosophy - definitely not for beginners.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

    An anthology of contemporary philosophers writing about Hegel and the infinite / religion. Hegel emerges mostly as a mystic from these articles, with some nuances and counterpoints. Generally, the articles range from challenging to somewhat inaccessible to those not initiated into the full complexity Hegel's thinking. All the articles are a fair amount of work. In some cases you are richly rewarded and in others, not so much. A couple felt downright trivial. I especially enjoyed Caputo, Taylor a An anthology of contemporary philosophers writing about Hegel and the infinite / religion. Hegel emerges mostly as a mystic from these articles, with some nuances and counterpoints. Generally, the articles range from challenging to somewhat inaccessible to those not initiated into the full complexity Hegel's thinking. All the articles are a fair amount of work. In some cases you are richly rewarded and in others, not so much. A couple felt downright trivial. I especially enjoyed Caputo, Taylor and Pahl.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Aaron

    Drawn in by Zizek's name. Good reading after some initial familiarity with Hegel. A fairly impressive collection altho some are more hit and others more miss. Drawn in by Zizek's name. Good reading after some initial familiarity with Hegel. A fairly impressive collection altho some are more hit and others more miss.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Nathan "N.R." Gaddis

    Reviewed here: http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/28705-hegel-a... Reviewed here: http://ndpr.nd.edu/news/28705-hegel-a...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Eilif Verney-elliott

    All the usual suspects: turgid, perfidious and boring.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Veronica

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alex F. Brown

  8. 4 out of 5

    Veeler.Play

  9. 4 out of 5

    Dave Seibert

  10. 4 out of 5

    Cain S.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Pawan Kumar

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Smith

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Nash

  14. 5 out of 5

    Charles

  15. 4 out of 5

    Julian

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alvaro Hernández Bello

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vapula

  18. 4 out of 5

    Princess

  19. 4 out of 5

    [چوہا] آدمی

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bukowskoevsky

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dave Hansel

  22. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joel Andersson

  24. 5 out of 5

    Mario Cardoso Cerusico

  25. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Cooke

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jesse

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mary Churay

  28. 4 out of 5

    Phil

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ina Cawl

  30. 5 out of 5

    JONGYOON PARK

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