website statistics You Are Not Your Brain: The 4-Step Solution for Changing Bad Habits, Ending Unhealthy Thinking, and Taking Control of Your Life - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

You Are Not Your Brain: The 4-Step Solution for Changing Bad Habits, Ending Unhealthy Thinking, and Taking Control of Your Life

Availability: Ready to download

Two neuroscience experts explain how their 4-Step Method can help break destructive thoughts and actions and change bad habits for good. A leading neuroplasticity researcher and the coauthor of the groundbreaking books Brain Lock and The Mind and the Brain, Jeffrey M. Schwartz has spent his career studying the structure and neuronal firing patterns of the human brain. He Two neuroscience experts explain how their 4-Step Method can help break destructive thoughts and actions and change bad habits for good. A leading neuroplasticity researcher and the coauthor of the groundbreaking books Brain Lock and The Mind and the Brain, Jeffrey M. Schwartz has spent his career studying the structure and neuronal firing patterns of the human brain. He pioneered the first mindfulness-based treatment program for people suffering from OCD, teaching patients how to achieve long-term relief from their compulsions. For the past six years, Schwartz has worked with psychiatrist Rebecca Gladding to refine a program that successfully explains how the brain works and why we often feel besieged by bad brain wiring. Just like with the compulsions of OCD patients, they discovered that bad habits, social anxieties, self-deprecating thoughts, and compulsive overindulgence are all rooted in overactive brain circuits. The key to making life changes that you want-to make your brain work for you-is to consciously choose to "starve" these circuits of focused attention, thereby decreasing their influence and strength. As evidenced by the huge success of Schwartz's previous books, as well as Daniel Amen's Change Your Brain, Change Your Life, and Norman Doidge's The Brain That Changes Itself, there is a large audience interested in harnessing the brain's untapped potential, yearning for a step-by-step, scientifically grounded and clinically proven approach. In fact, readers of Brain Lock wrote to the authors in record numbers asking for such a book. In You Are Not Your Brain, Schwartz and Gladding carefully outline their program, showing readers how to identify negative brain impulses, channel them through the power of focused attention, and ultimately lead more fulfilling and empowered lives.


Compare

Two neuroscience experts explain how their 4-Step Method can help break destructive thoughts and actions and change bad habits for good. A leading neuroplasticity researcher and the coauthor of the groundbreaking books Brain Lock and The Mind and the Brain, Jeffrey M. Schwartz has spent his career studying the structure and neuronal firing patterns of the human brain. He Two neuroscience experts explain how their 4-Step Method can help break destructive thoughts and actions and change bad habits for good. A leading neuroplasticity researcher and the coauthor of the groundbreaking books Brain Lock and The Mind and the Brain, Jeffrey M. Schwartz has spent his career studying the structure and neuronal firing patterns of the human brain. He pioneered the first mindfulness-based treatment program for people suffering from OCD, teaching patients how to achieve long-term relief from their compulsions. For the past six years, Schwartz has worked with psychiatrist Rebecca Gladding to refine a program that successfully explains how the brain works and why we often feel besieged by bad brain wiring. Just like with the compulsions of OCD patients, they discovered that bad habits, social anxieties, self-deprecating thoughts, and compulsive overindulgence are all rooted in overactive brain circuits. The key to making life changes that you want-to make your brain work for you-is to consciously choose to "starve" these circuits of focused attention, thereby decreasing their influence and strength. As evidenced by the huge success of Schwartz's previous books, as well as Daniel Amen's Change Your Brain, Change Your Life, and Norman Doidge's The Brain That Changes Itself, there is a large audience interested in harnessing the brain's untapped potential, yearning for a step-by-step, scientifically grounded and clinically proven approach. In fact, readers of Brain Lock wrote to the authors in record numbers asking for such a book. In You Are Not Your Brain, Schwartz and Gladding carefully outline their program, showing readers how to identify negative brain impulses, channel them through the power of focused attention, and ultimately lead more fulfilling and empowered lives.

30 review for You Are Not Your Brain: The 4-Step Solution for Changing Bad Habits, Ending Unhealthy Thinking, and Taking Control of Your Life

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sara Strand

    I will tell you that the reason I picked this book to review is because I have a very unhealthy way of thinking when it comes to diet and exercise. I am extremely good at talking myself out of good behaviors and convincing myself that the bad behaviors are not only more fun and awesome, but will be better for me later on. Despite the fact thunder thighs are not my friend. Basically everything in the book comes down to four steps: Step 1: Relabel: Identify your deceptive brain messages and the un I will tell you that the reason I picked this book to review is because I have a very unhealthy way of thinking when it comes to diet and exercise. I am extremely good at talking myself out of good behaviors and convincing myself that the bad behaviors are not only more fun and awesome, but will be better for me later on. Despite the fact thunder thighs are not my friend. Basically everything in the book comes down to four steps: Step 1: Relabel: Identify your deceptive brain messages and the uncomfortable sensations; call them what they really are. Step 2: Reframe: Change your perception of the importance of the deceptive brain messages; say why these thoughts, urges, and impulses keep bothering you: they are false brain messages. Step 3: Refocus: Direct your attention toward an activity or mental process that is wholesome and productive -- even while the deceptive brain messages are still bothering you. Step 4: Revalue: Clearly see the thoughts, images, and impulses for what they are -- simply sensations caused by deceptive brain messages that aren't true and have little to no value. Without going into a whole lot of detail about it (which is all explained really well and there are worksheets in the book for you to work through on your own) I will say I found them very helpful. At first the book started slow with me with a lot of precursor explainations that I didn't find relevant to me, but once it started talking about these four steps I was really interested. One of my favorite parts of this book is when it talks about biology is not your destiny. I find that people are so quick to rely on their biology to dictate their life versus trying to change themselves for the better. It's harder to change yourself but it's more rewarding. The other part of the book I found really helpful is the discussion of positive versus destructive anxiety. I am a high anxiety person and I often have to talk myself into things I know I'll enjoy because my brain is constantly telling me negatives. It's a problem to say the least. But I really felt like I had a better grip as to why I have that inner struggle so often. Overall, I found this book to be extremely helpful. If you are at all interested in learning about the brain, how to make changes in your life or both- this book is for you.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jesse Bowers

    Not a book for people wanting to learn about the brain, but for people who struggle with OCD, anxiety, and depression, you will find this book a powerful tool.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Melody

    I've been on a neurology kick, and picked this up at the library based on the credentials of the author. I thought it would not be a typical self-help book, even though the cover sure looked like one. I should have turned it over and noticed that one of the blurbs on the back was from Leonardo DiCaprio, noted neurology researcher movie actor. I guess that was a good example of a deceptive brain message, because this is a self-help manual with all the smarmy examples one might imagine. Abby thinks I've been on a neurology kick, and picked this up at the library based on the credentials of the author. I thought it would not be a typical self-help book, even though the cover sure looked like one. I should have turned it over and noticed that one of the blurbs on the back was from Leonardo DiCaprio, noted neurology researcher movie actor. I guess that was a good example of a deceptive brain message, because this is a self-help manual with all the smarmy examples one might imagine. Abby thinks too much! Sarah is depressed! Let's examine their behaviour at length. The death knell, for me, was the part where the authors explain, briefly, the neurology behind a certain response, then in essence dismissively say that you needn't bother your pretty little head- here's a perfect example: "Collectively, you can think of the amygdala, insula, and anterior cingulate as the warning center of the brain, or what we like to call the Uh-Oh Center." Uh-oh, indeed. This book didn't work for me (not that I applied it to any of my bad habits, I mean I didn't like it) and I can't recommend it unless you like dumbed-down science wrapped up in magazine-article style examples of people just like you only with no bad habits!!!!1!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Daniel Ionson

    I love this book for the data that it gives. SDN: "Self-directed neuroplasticity" was a complete life-changing piece of knowledge for me. However, I hate the style used in the writing of this book. It comes across as very "self-helpie" in the worst kinds of ways. So, if you go into this book forewarned of that style, the knowledge you gain is exciting and helpful. I love this book for the data that it gives. SDN: "Self-directed neuroplasticity" was a complete life-changing piece of knowledge for me. However, I hate the style used in the writing of this book. It comes across as very "self-helpie" in the worst kinds of ways. So, if you go into this book forewarned of that style, the knowledge you gain is exciting and helpful.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Emma Sea

    this approach is very similar to ACT therapy, except it makes a distinction between "emotional sensations" and "emotions," in which "emotional sensations" are are “deceptive . . . not true, and are leading you to act in ways that are not helpful or constructive.” In contrast emotions “should be felt and constructively dealt with because they honor your true needs and your true self.” It seems to me like a tangle of worms to try to distinguish between false emotional sensations and "real" emotions this approach is very similar to ACT therapy, except it makes a distinction between "emotional sensations" and "emotions," in which "emotional sensations" are are “deceptive . . . not true, and are leading you to act in ways that are not helpful or constructive.” In contrast emotions “should be felt and constructively dealt with because they honor your true needs and your true self.” It seems to me like a tangle of worms to try to distinguish between false emotional sensations and "real" emotions. I much prefer ACT's premise in which all emotions are 'real' experiences your brain is giving to you, noticed by the observing self. You can acknowledge emotions, and allow them space to exist, without being ruled by them. You can take action toward being the person you want to be, no matter what emotions your brain are presenting the observing self with. So, yeah, this is not my book. YMMV.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Aggie

    If you are doing inner work, this book is a must read. Seeing the prison is paramount if you hope to escape.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eric

    READ THIS BOOK! Excellent book! Although very redundant (it could use a ruthless editor to delete redundancy and dumb analogies), it has changed my life for the better. This book has empowered me. It just clicked with me and I "got it" instantly. It has given me a new direction. The very simple point that clicked for me was this: Your brain and your mind are two different things: your brain fires connections and your mind thinks/analyzes/decides. Sometimes your brain sends your mind wrong impulse READ THIS BOOK! Excellent book! Although very redundant (it could use a ruthless editor to delete redundancy and dumb analogies), it has changed my life for the better. This book has empowered me. It just clicked with me and I "got it" instantly. It has given me a new direction. The very simple point that clicked for me was this: Your brain and your mind are two different things: your brain fires connections and your mind thinks/analyzes/decides. Sometimes your brain sends your mind wrong impulses JUST BECAUSE THAT'S HOW THE SYNAPSES HAVE FORMED OVER ALL THE YEARS, but you have the ability to change those synapses, rewire you brain; you can destroy a synapse connection and build another in its place. You can tell your brain, "No, that's not right, not valid, not correct, not appropriate, not true." Before, my brain would automatically send thoughts and feelings to my mind because that's what it has always done and I would just follow them blindly. My brain would tell my mind, "Respond this way; do this, because that's what you have always done, so do it now because you're experiencing the same feelings and thoughts." No longer do I rely on those autopilot responses I have used for years that were built since I was a small child when my brain processes a thought. My mind can now intercept the DECEPTIVE BRAIN MESSAGES that my brain sends to my mind and I now have the option of rewriting them and reworking the connections in my brain. Now, my mind intercepts the DECEPTIVE BRAIN MESSAGES and because of my "WISE ADVOCATE" (or my true inner self, the Holy Spirit, the Spirit of God, the Light of Christ, or whatever you want to call it) telling me what is really appropriate and true, I can rewrite the response I know how to control my own reality and how I perceive things, especially myself and what I think and feel, as well as what happens to me and those things I "think" I want to have or do. I now know that I don't really want "those" things because they will damage me in some way or another and just make those bad synapses stronger. Those urges to respond to situations in a certain way, for example, this happens so feel this way; gone, because I now see that those habit responses are not really me nor what I really truly want for myself; they are my brain and just those faulty synapses firing. Feelings, bad habits, auto-responses, whatever they are, whether of inferiority, jealousy, etc., they are not really you; they are your brain because you have trained your brain to fire those synapses when certain things happen. You can break up those 12-lane highways you've created in your brain since early childhood and build other 12-lane highways through your brain synapses that you know are best for yourself.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    I'm not crazy for the gimicky title and much of the material has been in other books but it's the overall content of this book, the message and the concrete help the author offers that I'm loving. It's the neurobiological how-to of inner-bonding (Margaret Paul's Inner Child healing process) that I am always trying to distill for myself and other people. This book illuminates how to differentiate between the wounded part of us, what Schwartz calls "deceptive brain messages" versus the loving adul I'm not crazy for the gimicky title and much of the material has been in other books but it's the overall content of this book, the message and the concrete help the author offers that I'm loving. It's the neurobiological how-to of inner-bonding (Margaret Paul's Inner Child healing process) that I am always trying to distill for myself and other people. This book illuminates how to differentiate between the wounded part of us, what Schwartz calls "deceptive brain messages" versus the loving adult or Schwartz's "Wise Authority." It tackles the way in which we strengthen neural pathways through a reward of temporary relief when we indulge habits that are ultimately painful and harmful and are far from our true goals and awesomeness and the work involved to make new pathways and feel empowered. It's repetitive and a bit dense but the message, you are not your brain is huge. I'm going to use this stuff with my clients (and myself, for sure). Differentiating between the brain and the mind is a really useful tool as is mindfulness and components of CBT and ACT (acting on values). I've always been drawn to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy but the activities were too formulated and artificial. ACT focuses a lot on metaphors and is a very "heady" theory. I love that Schwartz took a lot of those concepts and made them applicable. As someone is constantly being taken away by overthinking/worrying and the like, I appreciate this very grounded and practical way of changing the way neurons fire. Self directed neuroplasticity is awesome.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kunal

    If there is one book for everything you need to know about will over skill, then this is it!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ally

    I have to be honest about this book: I was skeptical. The title sounds like an infomercial, and I've been studying ways to treat my OCD for a year now, with limited successes. But from the first chapter, I was hooked. The writers are very honest about the limitations of their program, including who will and will not benefit from it, and that it is strongly recommended it needs to be supplemented with therapy. The program itself is a combination of CBT and mindfulness practices, along with a gent I have to be honest about this book: I was skeptical. The title sounds like an infomercial, and I've been studying ways to treat my OCD for a year now, with limited successes. But from the first chapter, I was hooked. The writers are very honest about the limitations of their program, including who will and will not benefit from it, and that it is strongly recommended it needs to be supplemented with therapy. The program itself is a combination of CBT and mindfulness practices, along with a gentler version of exposure therapy that is designed, instead of forcing you to experience the extreme versions of your most unpleasant fears and anxieties, but to slowly work up to goals that specifically speak to you as a person. It's too early to say the program is having a huge effect, but I will say I'm catching myself thinking about it a lot, and I've been talking to people about it a LOT. The methods seem to work better than typical CBT, at least for me, which tends to cause more thought loops and preoccupations. I've marked up my copy with bookmarks and high lighters, and kept a journal while I was writing, and I know this is a book with a lot of practical advice that I keep coming back to. In addition, a lot of the personal stories speak directly to my experiences. You can't imagine how often I was nodding along or saying, "YES." out loud while I was reading this book. The thought processes and faulty logic of the OCD intrusive thoughts, and the anxiety-induced experiences are outlined really well. If you struggle with an anxiety disorder, or obsessiveness compulsive thoughts or actions, I HIGHLY recommend this book.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Vanessa Princessa

    I read this book thanks to the app Blinkist. The key message in this book: Your brain gives false, destructive messages, that trigger detrimental patterns and habits. But you have the ability to reshape this brain wiring. The Four Steps of relabeling, reframing, refocusing and revaluing allow you to break down the associations between unhealthy thoughts and habits. Actionable advice: The next time you feel the urge to procrastinate, go through the Four Steps. (1) Relabel by saying what’s happening: e I read this book thanks to the app Blinkist. The key message in this book: Your brain gives false, destructive messages, that trigger detrimental patterns and habits. But you have the ability to reshape this brain wiring. The Four Steps of relabeling, reframing, refocusing and revaluing allow you to break down the associations between unhealthy thoughts and habits. Actionable advice: The next time you feel the urge to procrastinate, go through the Four Steps. (1) Relabel by saying what’s happening: e.g., “I’m having the urge to go on Facebook.” (2) Reframe by reminding yourself why it’s troubling you: “Checking Facebook reduces my anxiety that I might not be able to complete the work I should be doing.” (3) Refocus by doing something productive like beginning the easiest work task. (4) Revalue by recognizing that this impulse to procrastinate is just a deceptive brain message, and needn’t be taken seriously. Keep a notebook of healthy activities. In order to work through the Four Steps effectively, why not keep a little book of healthy, productive or fun refocusing activities? This way, you’ll never be short of activities to distract you when a deceptive brain message pops up.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Iain

    I liked this book and it has a lot of good advice for coping with "deceptive brain messages" - that negative inner dialogue you sometimes have with yourself that holds you back from doing something or makes you reach for another glass of wine to cope after a stressful day. There's quite a lot of repetition in the book, which is why it didn't get a higher rating from me, personally, but I can see why it's there. It's designed to be repetitive to drum into you the four steps recommended to deal wit I liked this book and it has a lot of good advice for coping with "deceptive brain messages" - that negative inner dialogue you sometimes have with yourself that holds you back from doing something or makes you reach for another glass of wine to cope after a stressful day. There's quite a lot of repetition in the book, which is why it didn't get a higher rating from me, personally, but I can see why it's there. It's designed to be repetitive to drum into you the four steps recommended to deal with these intrusive thoughts. 1. Notice you are having such a thought 2. Relabel it for what it is 3. Refocus on what you want to achieve 4. Revalue - judge the thought and consider whether it is useful to you While the authors are at pains to point out that if you are in danger or have a serious mental condition you need medical help, these steps can help to overcome bad habits, cravings and negative sel-talk that plague us all from time to time.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    You Are Not Your Brain is a DIY psychology book that integrates cognitive-behavioral with recent brain science findings and mindfulness. I found it less readable or impressive than Emotional Life of the Brain by Richard Davidson or Emotional Chaos to Clarity by Phillip Moffitt. Basically, I was put off by the defining of "...the amygdala, insula, and anterior cingulate as the warning center of the brain, or what we like to call the Uh-Oh Center." The author's appeals to neuroscience are totally un You Are Not Your Brain is a DIY psychology book that integrates cognitive-behavioral with recent brain science findings and mindfulness. I found it less readable or impressive than Emotional Life of the Brain by Richard Davidson or Emotional Chaos to Clarity by Phillip Moffitt. Basically, I was put off by the defining of "...the amygdala, insula, and anterior cingulate as the warning center of the brain, or what we like to call the Uh-Oh Center." The author's appeals to neuroscience are totally undermined by only citing anecdotal evidence for his 4 Step approach. OTOH, I would definitely recommend this to readers who's eyes glaze over at words like neuroscience or amygdala. They will find the common language well-chosen. I would also recommend this to those who are considering or beginning Cognitive/Behavioral Therapy to help get on the same page as the therapist.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lesley

    Great read for do-it-yourself life coaching. Once you realize your brain is continuously sending you messages for all the wrong reasons (e.g., habits), you are able to readjust those destructive thoughts by calling on the mind for reconstructing the reality and presenting healthier responses. Interesting theory but will take some practice in awareness and differentiation to fully implement. However, I found the approach very valuable and refreshing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hlyan

    I wonder how this book even became a book. A fairly long article can do the work of it. The reason it deserves two stars instead of one is the 4-step solution, the main point of the book, is good and the book may also be interesting to people who are patient enough with unnecessarily long and repeated information.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    I read a synopsis of this book in a magazine, which was really interesting. However, it turned out to be a self-help book which turned me off by immediately introducing an internal "wise advocate". I'm marking this "read" so I don't try to pick it up again. I read a synopsis of this book in a magazine, which was really interesting. However, it turned out to be a self-help book which turned me off by immediately introducing an internal "wise advocate". I'm marking this "read" so I don't try to pick it up again.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Dina

    The whole book could have been written in 20 pages, instead of 200+.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aleyas Kulamadayil

    Slight cumbersome. But had a wealth of knowledge which deepened my faith in God

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    updating my review here having read it first in April, 2018, since has become my current go-to book on mental health!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Chris Weatherburn

    Separating your sense of self (mind) from deceptive brain messages is the main message of this book. Begins by teaching you what deceptive brain messages are and helps you identify the ones that are bothering and impairing you. The mind can powerfully and unexpectedly change the brain in positive ways when you intentionally direct your attention. Understand that negative thoughts are highly deceptive intruders are coming from your brain, not you! These false messages are not indicative of who yo Separating your sense of self (mind) from deceptive brain messages is the main message of this book. Begins by teaching you what deceptive brain messages are and helps you identify the ones that are bothering and impairing you. The mind can powerfully and unexpectedly change the brain in positive ways when you intentionally direct your attention. Understand that negative thoughts are highly deceptive intruders are coming from your brain, not you! These false messages are not indicative of who you are or of the life you could lead. Focus on this crucial distinction between who you are and the symptoms you are experiencing. Some methods may teach how to change the meaning of your thoughts such as cognitive behavioural therapy or how to become aware of your thoughts - mindfulness they do not emphatically tell you that these brain-based messages are not representative of who you really are and that you do not have to act on them. THE FOUR STEPS Step 1: Relabel—Identify your deceptive brain messages and the uncomfortable sensations; call them what they really are. Step 2: Reframe—Change your perception of the importance of the deceptive brain messages; say why these thoughts, urges, and impulses keep bothering you: They are false brain messages (It’s not ME, it’s just my BRAIN!). Step 3: Refocus—Direct your attention toward an activity or mental process that is wholesome and productive—even while the false and deceptive urges, thoughts, impulses, and sensations are still present and bothering you. Step 4: Revalue—Clearly see the thoughts, urges, and impulses for what they are, simply sensations caused by deceptive brain messages that are not true and that have little to no value (they are something to dismiss, not focus on). Focus your attention influence your brain and how it is wired. This means that if you repeat the same act over and over—regardless of whether that action has a positive or negative impact on you—you make the brain circuits associated with that act stronger and more powerful. Emotions should be felt and constructively dealt with because they honour your true needs and your true self, whereas emotional sensations should be relabelled and reframed with the Four Steps because they can be destructive and false. Deceptive brain messages aren't congruent with your goals, only when considerable effort is applied to to focus attention on things that matter such as achieving meaningful goals can you move forward and change your brain. Hebb’s Law: Neurons that “fire together wire together. Quantum Zeno Effect: Focused attention holds together and stabilizes brain circuits, so that they can wire together by Hebb’s law. Therefore attention density is the key ingredient to getting the quantum Zeno effect to work. When you repeatedly focus your attention on specific behaviours, Hebb’s law and the quantum Zeno effect create brain circuits associated with those actions. Book suggests that sometimes people will disagree with you, will be disappointed in you, or act inappropriately most importantly this may have nothing to do with you. We get so caught up in this endless thought-stream that reality flows by unnoticed. We spend our time engrossed in activity, caught up in an eternal pursuit of pleasure and gratification and eternal flight from pain and unpleasantness. At times spending all our energies trying to make ourselves feel better, trying to bury our fears, endlessly seeking security. In other words - we spend a considerable amount of our time engrossed in following deceptive brain messages until we begin to see them for what they are and value our true emotions and needs. Mindfulness Is an Activity, Not Merely a State of Mind. The 5 A’s Attention Affection Appreciation Allowing Acceptance this includes acknowledging that the deceptive brain messages and sensations will arise, but that you do not have to act on them. Rather, you can let them be present while continuing on with your day. The Wise Advocate is your ally and can be anyone or anything that helps you act in your genuine best interest and empowers you to see yourself from a loving and caring perspective. Listen to your Wise Advocate and support your true self. Your true self is your mind that enables you and gives you the power to choose what to focus your attention on. Revaluing helps strengthen your healthy messages, which enables you to further align your actions with your true self. Refocus with Progressive Mindfulness helps you get engaged in the world and following the path of your true self. VLOG summary: https://youtu.be/gBPvJvLwly4

  21. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    <><>><><>>>><><><><><><><>Spoilers for Inception follow<>><><><><><><><<><><><><>< "An idea can grow to define you or to destroy you." You Are Not Your Brain, as I like to call it, Inception: The Book, first of all because it is written by Jeffery A. Schwartz, the Howard Hughes expert who worked on the movie, The Aviator. Jeffery helped Leonardo Dicaprio to think like Howard Hughes. After the movie was over, Leonardo kept thinking like Howard Hughes, developed Obsessive compulsive disorder and r <><>><><>>>><><><><><><><>Spoilers for Inception follow<>><><><><><><><<><><><><>< "An idea can grow to define you or to destroy you." You Are Not Your Brain, as I like to call it, Inception: The Book, first of all because it is written by Jeffery A. Schwartz, the Howard Hughes expert who worked on the movie, The Aviator. Jeffery helped Leonardo Dicaprio to think like Howard Hughes. After the movie was over, Leonardo kept thinking like Howard Hughes, developed Obsessive compulsive disorder and required Schwartz help to break free of his brain lock. Brain lock is another book written by Schwartz. If you buy You are Not Your Brain, you will see the actor's name on the back of the book. Brain lock is when your brain is locked on one proposition or idea to the exclusion of valid reasoning. A renaissance example of this is when martin Luther became so focused on the Roman Catholic's church of transubstantiation(by which they believe that through the Greek philosophical dichotomy of the accidens( matter), and the substance(the "true nature" of the thing), but could not given a reasoned explanation of his position and began banging his shoe on the table yelling "Hoc es Corpus Mayem!"(which is the latin rendering of Jesu's words"my body for you") in rapid succession. Martin read John Calvin's view later in a book and found it reasonable. Martin Luther's brain became locked against reasoning that he would have otherwise accepted, had his mind been not as focused on defending his position, or if he had not had the idea to begin with. Another example of brain lock is when we were watching a television show with a friend and a situation came up which appeared to us to be morally ambiguous and confusing. The friend said "x is x no matter how you cut it." we would respond, "I agree with that, but is this an instance of x?" "x is x no matter how you cut it." "I agree with that." "x is x no matter how you cut it." This went on for at least twenty minutes. Some people say that labeling problems in the brain is materialistic. This slights over the fact that the brain is in fact a material thing that, like the body, can, due to being a part of a sinful fallen world, engage in retrograde activities. To seek to understand this marvelous creation of God's is not only beneficial, but a duty in routing out sin in a believer's life. This book is an excellent tool to perceive, change, and rewire thoughts. Only when you change your thinking can you change your actions. In inception, Dicaprio plays Cobb, a man who is lives in guilt of the idea that he planted the idea in his wife that the world was not real. This worked out fine as long as the world that they were in was a dream, and to get out of it they would have to commit suicide. This had problematic implications when she continued believing this idea out of its proper context. Cobb was right to assume that the responsibility of his wife's death for it was his activities, from experimenting with drugs, to trying to escape the effects of those drugs, that Mall committed suicide. Mall became a deceptive brain message because Cobb continually visited his memory of her using drugs, telling himself that he could bring her back. As a result of his reenergizing of his memory of Mall and his destruction of her forthwith, he begins to trust his memory of mall. Mall always ruins all of his plans for inside the dream in which Cobb is operating. Schwartz repeats the mantra to not indulge deceptive brain messages which a Christian would properly temptations to engage in sins. Upon feeling a temptation or urge to engage in an activity that is improper or sinful the Christian could tell himself "What I am feeling now is not me, although it is me. It is the old man in me, the remaining sin in my being. It is not my true self, it is no longer a real part of me. As Pastor Bennett said that a dutch theologian said 'The indicative drives the imperative.' which means that though the federal head of the human race rejected the light of God, plunging humanity into a fallen state of sin and misery, God saw fit to redeem a portion of his creation that was fit for destruction through the union with His son Jesus, who by virtue of being of infinite value, would kill death by sacrificing himself to take on the infinite wrath of God necessitated by His people’s sins. Now (Imperative) His people are commanded to be at work in the world redeeming it for God’s glory through the indwelling of His Spirit which is especially activated upon prayer and contact with scripture. While the old man wishes to sin, the new man wishes to obey and not sin. This book can be very helpful in identifying rational lines of thought that lead to irrational action, irrational lines of thought that lead to irrational action, a tool to know yourself and change yourself(or let God change you) which can be used to focus the Bible on areas of your life into which that sin has fortified itself. Inception ends with Cobb realizing that Mall is just a figment of his memory, and that he cannot bring her back, he can only remember her. But he does not remember the good things, he dwells on his mistake, seeking to right it. The Christian cannot fix his mistakes, at least by himself, but can rely on the saviour to cover his sins with His infinitely valuable blood, slowly changing the Christian into what he was meant to be in both his thoughts and actions. This also applies to Memento. Caveat: There is talk in the book of eastern mysticism. It would appear that a particular skill should not be rejected if solely because of its association with a particular false religion, but by whether it is compatible with scripture. For instance, Buddhists are known for the ability to observe certain aspects of reality without overreacting. This skill is not necessarily and irrevocably tied to a belief that everything's oneness and God's presumed non-existence. Indeed, Christians are called to know themselves, and control themselves because God does exist, and is working through them. You get out of this book what you put In to it. Being a tool, it will not help you if you do regularly and repeatedly use it to rule your routine. If you fail to fill out its forms, you will inevitably fail to use it to reform yourself. In inception Cobb regularly reviews his remedy to his reaction to the removal of reality in rooms. YANYB contains an elevator example which starts with entertaining an idea of getting in an elevator, entering said elevator, then immediately exiting elevator, then accepting the relative safety of the elevator. In summary, I used to think like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UzdhR... Then I thought like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoyToH... But now I think like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=94TAF... Although I sometimes think like this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1AfNO...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Smith

    I enjoyed this book a lot. It's a great complement to "The Power of Now", almost like a more Lamen's terms version that's based around the science of living in the now as opposed to the spiritual side of it. What I found interesting though is how closely the two relate, with the differences really only being in the verbiage used to explain different ideas. For example, what the Power of Now refers to as your "being" or "conscious", "You Are Not Your Brain" calls it your "Wise Advocate". I though I enjoyed this book a lot. It's a great complement to "The Power of Now", almost like a more Lamen's terms version that's based around the science of living in the now as opposed to the spiritual side of it. What I found interesting though is how closely the two relate, with the differences really only being in the verbiage used to explain different ideas. For example, what the Power of Now refers to as your "being" or "conscious", "You Are Not Your Brain" calls it your "Wise Advocate". I thought it was great how this book broke down how your brain puts together false thoughts and creates the bad habits that people might not necessarily see as being bad since they've been doing them unconsciously for so long. Their explanations are easy enough to understand as well and along with the client stories they used, the book does a great job in teaching you exactly what you can do if you want to start practicing their method. What I didn't love was the amount of times they mentioned "The 4 Step Program" as if at times feels pretty salesy. Towards to end I started to realize that it was somewhat needed in order to drive their point home, but at times it was a bit cheesy. Overall I would definitely recommend this to anyone who is into these kinds of mindfulness and well being books or anyone who truly feels like they need to change some of their ways.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Keegan Crabtree

    You Are Not Your Brain: The 4-Step Solution for Changing Bad Habits, Ending Unhealthy Thinking, and Taking Control of Your Life by Jeffrey M. Schwartz, M.D. and Rebecca Gladding, M.D. is a very informative analytical book over the author’s program for overcoming deceptive brain messages. This book was slightly out of my comfortability, it is far more advanced than many other books I’ve read and it is about a topic I would have never pictured myself learning about. Although I went out of my box b You Are Not Your Brain: The 4-Step Solution for Changing Bad Habits, Ending Unhealthy Thinking, and Taking Control of Your Life by Jeffrey M. Schwartz, M.D. and Rebecca Gladding, M.D. is a very informative analytical book over the author’s program for overcoming deceptive brain messages. This book was slightly out of my comfortability, it is far more advanced than many other books I’ve read and it is about a topic I would have never pictured myself learning about. Although I went out of my box by reading this book, I am very pleased with the knowledge the writers provided me. I began reading this book for the first time and reached about 150 pages, to realize I was not picking up much information… I restarted the book at a little slower of a pace so could take in what I was reading. The four steps the book is based around are really helpful, but I almost find it more helpful just understanding deceptive brain messages and cognitive distortions. These are said to be the reasons for all bad habits and unhealthy thinking. This is an excellent book I would recommend to anyone trying to positively impact their lives.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael Loveless

    This book is a tough one to rate. On the one hand the writing was very difficult. The phrase, "deceptive brain messages" was used so frequently that I couldn't help but think the book would make a good drinking game (very ironic considering the subject matter). Like many similar books it could also easily have been reduced to a 15 page magazine article and kept 90% of its value. However the book does give specific and actionable ideas for people struggling with addictions, anxieties, or other is This book is a tough one to rate. On the one hand the writing was very difficult. The phrase, "deceptive brain messages" was used so frequently that I couldn't help but think the book would make a good drinking game (very ironic considering the subject matter). Like many similar books it could also easily have been reduced to a 15 page magazine article and kept 90% of its value. However the book does give specific and actionable ideas for people struggling with addictions, anxieties, or other issues in which their brain works against their happiness. The authors suggest four simple steps: 1) Relabel the thoughts as deceptive brain messages. 2) Reframe the importance of the thoughts. 3) Refocus attention to something else to break the connection between the thoughts and their unpleasant results. 4) Revalue the thoughts as unimportant. If you can slog through the unpleasant writing style, there is enough useful substance in this book to be quite helpful.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ness

    SF Library Audiobook - 4 stars "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle "Mindfulness is an activity, not a state of mind." This was an educational book, filled with exercises and ways to identify deceptive brain messages. It follows real life examples to help demonstrate how to apply the 4 step solution to change bad habits (eg smoking, over-eating, excessive worrying, constantly checking your phone etc) It was a bit repetitive but there were nuggets of SF Library Audiobook - 4 stars "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence then is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle "Mindfulness is an activity, not a state of mind." This was an educational book, filled with exercises and ways to identify deceptive brain messages. It follows real life examples to help demonstrate how to apply the 4 step solution to change bad habits (eg smoking, over-eating, excessive worrying, constantly checking your phone etc) It was a bit repetitive but there were nuggets of gold in there, especially the second half of the book. I personally didn't do all the exercises covered in the book but it definitely made me more aware of "thinking errors", which are: *Black & White thinking *Catastrophising/fortune-telling/worst-case scenario *Discounting the positives *Emotional reasoning *Mind reading *Should statements *False expectations *Faulty comparisons

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lynette Caulkins

    Do you have anxiety, depression, addictions, or social misperceptions that you want to escape? This is one of the best self-help books I've found that teach methods you can use to literally retrain your brain on a biological as well as psychological basis so that you can build personal happiness effectively. Just reading it through the first time (don't rush - let it percolate through a few weeks) affects your approach to triggers so that you can start very quickly to change your personal reacti Do you have anxiety, depression, addictions, or social misperceptions that you want to escape? This is one of the best self-help books I've found that teach methods you can use to literally retrain your brain on a biological as well as psychological basis so that you can build personal happiness effectively. Just reading it through the first time (don't rush - let it percolate through a few weeks) affects your approach to triggers so that you can start very quickly to change your personal reaction to mild/moderate behavioral problems. I'm looking forward to applying the method systematically to the more strongly-entrenched habits and misreactions that have been bothering me. I have great hope that this book will be highly effective at helping a family member tame anxiety attacks. Definitely a 5-star selection for your self-help and personal development shelves.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nikita

    The book is worse than the title. I would never have even opened a book with a title like this if not for the fact that someone recommended it to me. I almost threw up by page 10 because of how badly it is written but kept reading hoping for at least some useful information. And I couldn't get past page 25 because it's just repetitive nonsense. The book tries to present itself as if it is about some kind of research on how the brain works. But it is written as if it is another trendy diet or a Sc The book is worse than the title. I would never have even opened a book with a title like this if not for the fact that someone recommended it to me. I almost threw up by page 10 because of how badly it is written but kept reading hoping for at least some useful information. And I couldn't get past page 25 because it's just repetitive nonsense. The book tries to present itself as if it is about some kind of research on how the brain works. But it is written as if it is another trendy diet or a Scientology spin-off sect. One positive outcome is that I'll never have to speak to the person who recommended it to me again.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Nich Kwon

    Absolutely life-changing book. I've bought like 5 copies to distribute to friends and family as needed. A really good way to develop the skill of understanding your thoughts and feelings, especially how to distinguish which are true and authentic and which are deceptive and harmful. The authors go even further and explain how to diminish the deceptive thoughts to get out of depression, bad habits, or anxiety. A lot of the book is personal stories about people who have used the method with success Absolutely life-changing book. I've bought like 5 copies to distribute to friends and family as needed. A really good way to develop the skill of understanding your thoughts and feelings, especially how to distinguish which are true and authentic and which are deceptive and harmful. The authors go even further and explain how to diminish the deceptive thoughts to get out of depression, bad habits, or anxiety. A lot of the book is personal stories about people who have used the method with success, so it may seem repetitive, but the core of the method is really compelling and effective. This strategy is very close to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Proudcat

    The main purpose of this book is to tell you you could change or revert your own thoughts in a positive way on a permanent basis. It also helps to explain why and how bad habits could be eliminated. The book is quite scientific and reminds me of textbooks so it is not easy to read. However it contains many real life examples to guide and explain that I think are very helpful. I personally liked various mind exercises and in general a chapter about mindfulness. So if you have some bad habits or j The main purpose of this book is to tell you you could change or revert your own thoughts in a positive way on a permanent basis. It also helps to explain why and how bad habits could be eliminated. The book is quite scientific and reminds me of textbooks so it is not easy to read. However it contains many real life examples to guide and explain that I think are very helpful. I personally liked various mind exercises and in general a chapter about mindfulness. So if you have some bad habits or just bad thoughts , depressed or too stressed out this book is for you!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Samuel Corbett

    I read this book after reading Leadership and Self-deception. Not only did it make me more aware of the deceptive messages that my brain has been producing, but it's also allowed me to be more mindful of how I react. Furthermore, the book has allowed me to gain more compassion for those in my life because I now have an understanding of why they respond in particular ways due to their deceptive messages formed from their past. Going forward, I am working on fulfilling the 5 A’s for myself so that I read this book after reading Leadership and Self-deception. Not only did it make me more aware of the deceptive messages that my brain has been producing, but it's also allowed me to be more mindful of how I react. Furthermore, the book has allowed me to gain more compassion for those in my life because I now have an understanding of why they respond in particular ways due to their deceptive messages formed from their past. Going forward, I am working on fulfilling the 5 A’s for myself so that I can become more independent and have healthier relationships with those in my life.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.