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Artemisia of Caria

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Thousands of years ago, in the world of the Ancient Greeks where women were expected to obey their husbands in all matters, to play no part in public life, and to stay inside the house, a princess grew up to be not only a sailor and a ship’s captain, but a famous admiral. Her name was Artemisia, and among all the commanders fighting on the Persian side during the great Per Thousands of years ago, in the world of the Ancient Greeks where women were expected to obey their husbands in all matters, to play no part in public life, and to stay inside the house, a princess grew up to be not only a sailor and a ship’s captain, but a famous admiral. Her name was Artemisia, and among all the commanders fighting on the Persian side during the great Persian Wars, she alone dared to give Xerxes an honest opinion that could have saved his entire fleet. This is the story of a real and remarkable princess whose spirit prompted the Persian Great King, Xerxes, to declare, "My men have become women, and my women men!"


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Thousands of years ago, in the world of the Ancient Greeks where women were expected to obey their husbands in all matters, to play no part in public life, and to stay inside the house, a princess grew up to be not only a sailor and a ship’s captain, but a famous admiral. Her name was Artemisia, and among all the commanders fighting on the Persian side during the great Per Thousands of years ago, in the world of the Ancient Greeks where women were expected to obey their husbands in all matters, to play no part in public life, and to stay inside the house, a princess grew up to be not only a sailor and a ship’s captain, but a famous admiral. Her name was Artemisia, and among all the commanders fighting on the Persian side during the great Persian Wars, she alone dared to give Xerxes an honest opinion that could have saved his entire fleet. This is the story of a real and remarkable princess whose spirit prompted the Persian Great King, Xerxes, to declare, "My men have become women, and my women men!"

35 review for Artemisia of Caria

  1. 5 out of 5

    Abigail

    This entry in Shirin Yim Bridges' The Thinking Girl's Treasury of Real Princesses - a six-volume picture-book series highlighting the lives and legacies of extraordinary women rulers throughout history - presents the story of Artemisia I of Caria, a 5th-century BCE queen who ruled a Greek city-state in Anatolia (modern-day Turkey), and fought with Xerxes in the Persian Wars. Acknowledging that little is known about Artemisia's childhood (there are simply no extant sources), but speculating that This entry in Shirin Yim Bridges' The Thinking Girl's Treasury of Real Princesses - a six-volume picture-book series highlighting the lives and legacies of extraordinary women rulers throughout history - presents the story of Artemisia I of Caria, a 5th-century BCE queen who ruled a Greek city-state in Anatolia (modern-day Turkey), and fought with Xerxes in the Persian Wars. Acknowledging that little is known about Artemisia's childhood (there are simply no extant sources), but speculating that it must have been atypical, since she was trained to command a trireme (an ancient Greek galley ship, used in warfare) at a time when most women were confined to the women's quarters (gynaikon), Bridges sets out her subject's role as commander of the Carian ships that were part of the larger Persian fleet that fought the Greeks at Salamis (and were defeated), and notes that Artemisia was the only one of Xerxes' commanders willing to give him an honest and critical opinion of his strategies. Unlike some of the other figures profiled in this series, from Sorghaghtani of Mongolia to Qutlugh Terkan Khatun of Kirman, I had already heard of Artemisia, through the work of the classical Greek historian Herodotus. I don't think I'd ever encountered her name elsewhere, however, so I am delighted to have stumbled across this brief biography! As a student of classical antiquity, most of what I've read about the Persian Wars has been from the Greek perspective, so it's interesting to see something - intended for younger readers, no less! - from the other side. I appreciated the fact that the author didn't exclude possible negative aspects of Artemisia's story (as with Isabella of Castile, there is a final section of the book devoted to "The Not-So Nice Part of Her Story"), and discussed the fact that the ship she rammed, in order to bring her own vessel to safety, was most likely a Persian one. Highly recommended, together with the other entries in the series, to young readers with an interest in world history, particularly those who want to learn about fascinating figures whose stories deserve to be better known.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Karen

    Pre-read for CC1. Jacob and mom rated 4 stars and Ellie 1 star

  3. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    While this was fascinating, it was frustrating.The stories in this series are interesting but leave more questions. Was Artemisia of royal birth? Did she have a life besides the one military event mentioned? I realize maybe the answer is we don't know. But if the author would only put her sources into the series, we could then find out more if we are interested. For all I know, she made up the whole story. I don't really believe that, but my point is, without sources, you have no simple way of e While this was fascinating, it was frustrating.The stories in this series are interesting but leave more questions. Was Artemisia of royal birth? Did she have a life besides the one military event mentioned? I realize maybe the answer is we don't know. But if the author would only put her sources into the series, we could then find out more if we are interested. For all I know, she made up the whole story. I don't really believe that, but my point is, without sources, you have no simple way of evaluating how careful an author is being with the subject of the book. And you have to do your own research if you want more information instead of starting with the author's sources. Anytime a commoner stood up to a royal person, that commoner was either incredibly stupid, or incredibly smart and brave. I suppose Artemisia was smart and brave, although there is a strong hint that she sank another ship on her side in her efforts to be elsewhere during the battle. In other words, the brave part is questionable. So now I am going to have to see if I can run other sources down for this person!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Mareena

    Artemisia of Caria was the first ruling Queen of ancient Greece. She was made an Admiral by the Persian King Xerxes and fought in many battles. I found it interesting that Artemisia was taken so seriously at a time when Greek women were considered second class citizens. I really enjoyed this book because I like history and tales of strong women. I give this book an A!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  6. 4 out of 5

    Geli & Arte

  7. 5 out of 5

    Syrus

  8. 5 out of 5

    Livingston Arts

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  10. 5 out of 5

    Lee Corey

  11. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

  12. 5 out of 5

    Shirin

  13. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Hanson

  14. 4 out of 5

    Guen

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ruth Hill

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ann

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gianna

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

  20. 4 out of 5

    Joy

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kate Rowland

  22. 5 out of 5

    Yinzadi

  23. 5 out of 5

    CBC Diversity

  24. 4 out of 5

    Subatra

  25. 4 out of 5

    Heather

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lyndsey

  27. 4 out of 5

    Nicoli

  28. 4 out of 5

    Vivian

  29. 4 out of 5

    Case

  30. 4 out of 5

    Antonina

  31. 5 out of 5

    Radheeka

  32. 4 out of 5

    Brenda

  33. 4 out of 5

    Kayleigh

  34. 5 out of 5

    Dick Cleek

  35. 4 out of 5

    Cassie Helwig

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