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Friday on Our Minds: Popular Culture in Australia Since 1945

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From jitterbugging and Big Brother to the introduction of television and the rise of file-sharing, this study explores the ways in which popular culture has developed and changed in Australia from the end of World War II to today. In order to understand the massive social and cultural changes that have taken place Down Under, popular culture is examined through three main From jitterbugging and Big Brother to the introduction of television and the rise of file-sharing, this study explores the ways in which popular culture has developed and changed in Australia from the end of World War II to today. In order to understand the massive social and cultural changes that have taken place Down Under, popular culture is examined through three main lenses: consumerism and the development of a mass consumer society, the impact of technological change, and the ways in which popular culture contributes to and articulates individual and collective identities. Providing the first integrated account of Australian post-war culture, this reference analyzes film, television, sports, music, and leisure in relation to each other rather than as stand-alone cultural forms.


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From jitterbugging and Big Brother to the introduction of television and the rise of file-sharing, this study explores the ways in which popular culture has developed and changed in Australia from the end of World War II to today. In order to understand the massive social and cultural changes that have taken place Down Under, popular culture is examined through three main From jitterbugging and Big Brother to the introduction of television and the rise of file-sharing, this study explores the ways in which popular culture has developed and changed in Australia from the end of World War II to today. In order to understand the massive social and cultural changes that have taken place Down Under, popular culture is examined through three main lenses: consumerism and the development of a mass consumer society, the impact of technological change, and the ways in which popular culture contributes to and articulates individual and collective identities. Providing the first integrated account of Australian post-war culture, this reference analyzes film, television, sports, music, and leisure in relation to each other rather than as stand-alone cultural forms.

37 review for Friday on Our Minds: Popular Culture in Australia Since 1945

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    Really fascinating look at pop culture and was a really excellent unit- didn't quite? read all this i don't think (as all assigned reading i ever do rip) but most of it so, counting it as read. definitely worth reading if you have an interest in that area, and one of the most readable texts i've ever had for class! Really fascinating look at pop culture and was a really excellent unit- didn't quite? read all this i don't think (as all assigned reading i ever do rip) but most of it so, counting it as read. definitely worth reading if you have an interest in that area, and one of the most readable texts i've ever had for class!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Rebecka O'Malley

    I bought this to read for my pop culture class, and it was actually very interesting. I would say that anyone with an interest in popular culture and modern history could enjoy this. There were some parts I skimmed, as they were covered very similarly in my lecture, but otherwise, this was a concise and interesting book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    emily

    A comprehensive and easy to read history of the shift of popular culture from private to commercial spheres Post-WWII, particularly focusing on Australia's unique and interesting development - amid a time when many were attempting to define an Australian identity through cultural means. Whether or not this was successful, it is a fascinating time of Australia's history, where teenagers, television, suburbanisation, and consumerism were all developing and rising. A comprehensive and easy to read history of the shift of popular culture from private to commercial spheres Post-WWII, particularly focusing on Australia's unique and interesting development - amid a time when many were attempting to define an Australian identity through cultural means. Whether or not this was successful, it is a fascinating time of Australia's history, where teenagers, television, suburbanisation, and consumerism were all developing and rising.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Beejay

    Wow, how wonderful it would be if all "required reading" was as easy as Michelle Arrow's book. I loved it, particularly as so much of what she writes about really is the backdrop of my life. For anybody studying modern, post-war history or with an interest in the development of popular culture, this is highly recommended. One I will dip back into many times in the future. Wow, how wonderful it would be if all "required reading" was as easy as Michelle Arrow's book. I loved it, particularly as so much of what she writes about really is the backdrop of my life. For anybody studying modern, post-war history or with an interest in the development of popular culture, this is highly recommended. One I will dip back into many times in the future.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Used this for the Year 10 History Pop Culture unit. It was a good reference text. I would've preferred more photos and other primary sources and felt that it glossed over some areas (mainly film and TV) but it was a good, reasonably concise, chronological look at the history of pop culture in Australia. Used this for the Year 10 History Pop Culture unit. It was a good reference text. I would've preferred more photos and other primary sources and felt that it glossed over some areas (mainly film and TV) but it was a good, reasonably concise, chronological look at the history of pop culture in Australia.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Nette

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kayla

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Cochrane

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Muncey

  11. 5 out of 5

    Stockfish

  12. 5 out of 5

    Linda Boone

  13. 5 out of 5

    Therese

  14. 4 out of 5

    RJH

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cate Hayton

  16. 5 out of 5

    Julie Woods

  17. 5 out of 5

    Middlethought

  18. 5 out of 5

    Grace

  19. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rhi1981

  21. 5 out of 5

    Chris Miles

  22. 4 out of 5

    Toryn Green

  23. 5 out of 5

    Broderic

  24. 5 out of 5

    Somethingsnotright

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Keating

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kristy 0

  27. 4 out of 5

    rin

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michael Livingston

  29. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nat

  31. 4 out of 5

    DrJ

  32. 4 out of 5

    Mon Lukas

  33. 4 out of 5

    Jaymee

  34. 4 out of 5

    Carielyn

  35. 4 out of 5

    Meg Dickerson

  36. 5 out of 5

    Carlie

  37. 5 out of 5

    Leanna

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