website statistics The Twilight of Equality?: Neoliberalism, Cultural Politics, and the Attack on Democracy - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

The Twilight of Equality?: Neoliberalism, Cultural Politics, and the Attack on Democracy

Availability: Ready to download

By now we've all heard about the shocking redistribution of wealth that's occurred during the last thirty years, and particularly during the last decade. But economic changes like this don't occur in a vacuum; they're always linked to politics. The Twilight of Equality? searches out these links through an analysis of the politics of the 1990s, the decade when neoliberalism By now we've all heard about the shocking redistribution of wealth that's occurred during the last thirty years, and particularly during the last decade. But economic changes like this don't occur in a vacuum; they're always linked to politics. The Twilight of Equality? searches out these links through an analysis of the politics of the 1990s, the decade when neoliberalism-free market economics-became gospel. After a brilliant historical examination of how racial and gender inequities were woven into the very theoretical underpinnings of the neoliberal model of the state, Duggan shows how these inequities play out today. In a series of political case studies, Duggan reveals how neoliberal goals have been pursued, demonstrating that progressive arguments that separate identity politics and economic policy, cultural politics and affairs of state, can only fail. Ultimately, The Twilight of Equality? not only reveals how the highly successful rhetorical maneuvers of neoliberalism have functioned but, more importantly, it shows a way to revitalize and unify progressive politics in the U.S. today.


Compare

By now we've all heard about the shocking redistribution of wealth that's occurred during the last thirty years, and particularly during the last decade. But economic changes like this don't occur in a vacuum; they're always linked to politics. The Twilight of Equality? searches out these links through an analysis of the politics of the 1990s, the decade when neoliberalism By now we've all heard about the shocking redistribution of wealth that's occurred during the last thirty years, and particularly during the last decade. But economic changes like this don't occur in a vacuum; they're always linked to politics. The Twilight of Equality? searches out these links through an analysis of the politics of the 1990s, the decade when neoliberalism-free market economics-became gospel. After a brilliant historical examination of how racial and gender inequities were woven into the very theoretical underpinnings of the neoliberal model of the state, Duggan shows how these inequities play out today. In a series of political case studies, Duggan reveals how neoliberal goals have been pursued, demonstrating that progressive arguments that separate identity politics and economic policy, cultural politics and affairs of state, can only fail. Ultimately, The Twilight of Equality? not only reveals how the highly successful rhetorical maneuvers of neoliberalism have functioned but, more importantly, it shows a way to revitalize and unify progressive politics in the U.S. today.

30 review for The Twilight of Equality?: Neoliberalism, Cultural Politics, and the Attack on Democracy

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mehrsa

    This book is brilliant and it's the best book I've read thus far that explains the uncomfortable nexus between the "culture war" and neoliberalism conflict. I mean come for the analysis of neoliberalism, but stay for her takedown of Andrew Sullivan This book is brilliant and it's the best book I've read thus far that explains the uncomfortable nexus between the "culture war" and neoliberalism conflict. I mean come for the analysis of neoliberalism, but stay for her takedown of Andrew Sullivan

  2. 5 out of 5

    S

    I recommend this book all the time because it very effectively addresses the interplay of rightwing cultural politics (at this point i would say postmodernism) and class politics by the Republicans over the 1990s. It also covers such things as why many NGOs in the U.S. are very moderate (the social movements that generating them are gone, so they're left as sort of the froth of the wave washed up on the beach.) Anyway, highly recommend it, especially if you're interested in the identity v. class I recommend this book all the time because it very effectively addresses the interplay of rightwing cultural politics (at this point i would say postmodernism) and class politics by the Republicans over the 1990s. It also covers such things as why many NGOs in the U.S. are very moderate (the social movements that generating them are gone, so they're left as sort of the froth of the wave washed up on the beach.) Anyway, highly recommend it, especially if you're interested in the identity v. class dichotomy that Thomas Frank started up again in What's The Matter With Kansas.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Levitt

    This book offers a history of neoliberal economic and cultural politics, and Duggan argues that the left needs to recognize the interrelationship between culture and economics. Although the political climate these days seems more illiberal than neoliberal, her critique of the false split between economic universalism and identity politics on the left still stands. The book is also useful for its case studies of the gay rights movement and the culture wars as well its extensive bibliography of co This book offers a history of neoliberal economic and cultural politics, and Duggan argues that the left needs to recognize the interrelationship between culture and economics. Although the political climate these days seems more illiberal than neoliberal, her critique of the false split between economic universalism and identity politics on the left still stands. The book is also useful for its case studies of the gay rights movement and the culture wars as well its extensive bibliography of contemporary progressive thought. This book is short and fun to read. Duggan does not hold back as she goes after everyone from Andrew Sullivan to Naomi Klein. At least you'll be laughing as the world burns.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Short and quick introduction to the cultural politics of neoliberalism (and how they connect to the political-economics of neoliberalism). I appreciated Duggan's complex critique--not only neoliberals but the "progressives" who have been depoliticized by neoliberals and the leftists who think "class comes first, sweetie." The first installment in this semester's reading list. The chapter on gay neoliberals and homonormativity, "Equality, Inc.," will be useful for my thesis. Short and quick introduction to the cultural politics of neoliberalism (and how they connect to the political-economics of neoliberalism). I appreciated Duggan's complex critique--not only neoliberals but the "progressives" who have been depoliticized by neoliberals and the leftists who think "class comes first, sweetie." The first installment in this semester's reading list. The chapter on gay neoliberals and homonormativity, "Equality, Inc.," will be useful for my thesis.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This is an old text I had to purchase for a course in college, I believe my feminist theory class. When cleaning out my books recently, I almost pitched it--generally speaking, books that discuss the current state of politics simply don't age well, and it's been almost ten years. Then I realized that I'd already read half of it, and I only had about 45 pages left. So I decided to finish it. Boy, I'm glad I did. This book was actually really fun to read. Parts of it were sort of dull, and then WHA This is an old text I had to purchase for a course in college, I believe my feminist theory class. When cleaning out my books recently, I almost pitched it--generally speaking, books that discuss the current state of politics simply don't age well, and it's been almost ten years. Then I realized that I'd already read half of it, and I only had about 45 pages left. So I decided to finish it. Boy, I'm glad I did. This book was actually really fun to read. Parts of it were sort of dull, and then WHAM. Great incisive points, some serious burns thrown in, and really large theoretical issues raised. It's become historical on some level, but this book also raised some truly fascinating questions for me about how the author's agenda must have changed in the intervening ten years, or how different our culture was back then, where we've seen a tremendous shift in "identity politics" and the political view on economics and neoliberalism. This book really made me think back to how queerness was viewed back when I was first coming out, and how our political landscape really worked back then. I don't think I've ever really been fascinated by a feminist theory text before, but this one was hilarious for me in its burns on writers that the author didn't like, and also fascinating knowing now, ten years later, how our culture and world has shifted. I wrote a lot in the margins. Shockingly fun.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    economics and culture cannot be separated and the Left needs to be on guard against attempts to divide them. pretty basic but, you know, on the flip side, succinct. wins points for being dry and clear, also for describing a rival's work as a "thoroughly humorless little homily". loses points for claiming to be a general look at the economic dimension of the "culture wars" but in fact focusing mostly on attacks on queer activism at the expense of looking in any depth at increases in institutional economics and culture cannot be separated and the Left needs to be on guard against attempts to divide them. pretty basic but, you know, on the flip side, succinct. wins points for being dry and clear, also for describing a rival's work as a "thoroughly humorless little homily". loses points for claiming to be a general look at the economic dimension of the "culture wars" but in fact focusing mostly on attacks on queer activism at the expense of looking in any depth at increases in institutionalised racism and misogyny. Also there's a bit of a missed opportunity here to interrogate the rise of the concept of "classism", a culturally focused reframe of a what would seem to be the paradigmatic economic issue. my main issue is that I was kind of hoping for at least a bit of a look at the failures of the cultural studies part of the progressive academy to confront capitalism — which is a thing! it's not just a strawman accusation levelled at feminists, queers, and anti-racists by white brogressive anti-capitalists. instead, duggan critiques gay neocons (fish in a barrel at this point if you're even remotely left-wing) for an excessive focus on identity , and the previously-mentioned strawman-accusing anti-capitalist types for an excessive disavowal of identity/cultural politics. it's …almost as if duggan doesn't wanna listen to any critiques of the camp she's aligned with? SAY IT AIN'T SO

  7. 5 out of 5

    Quin Rich

    A good, brief (if dated) primer into neoliberalism and the challenge it poses to left politics. Duggan clearly lays out how the seemingly contradictory positions of social conservatism and economic deregulation came to be united in the contemporary US. She further elaborates how the distinction between class and identity politics is spurious, counterproductive, and untenable, as well as how neoliberalism has also incorporated limited claims to equality and recognition for select segments of marg A good, brief (if dated) primer into neoliberalism and the challenge it poses to left politics. Duggan clearly lays out how the seemingly contradictory positions of social conservatism and economic deregulation came to be united in the contemporary US. She further elaborates how the distinction between class and identity politics is spurious, counterproductive, and untenable, as well as how neoliberalism has also incorporated limited claims to equality and recognition for select segments of marginalized social groups (eg white cis homonormative wealthy gay men). Duggan calls for a creative and reinvigorated left politics that recognizes the necessity and inextricability of both class and identity politics. Especially illuminating in light of Sheryl Sandberg's Lean In, which is the epitome of neoliberal "feminism."

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    This book's critique of Andrew Sullivan's politics in the 1990s is excellent and worth reading, and its first couple of chapters are a good basic primer on neoliberalism that would work well for teaching. Duggan's point that neoliberal policies have been built on disciplining racial / gender/sexual "others" is well articulated (though not new.) However, her concluding prediction that the effort to "discipline the troops" struggling against neoliberalism will fail was an overly-optimistic one in This book's critique of Andrew Sullivan's politics in the 1990s is excellent and worth reading, and its first couple of chapters are a good basic primer on neoliberalism that would work well for teaching. Duggan's point that neoliberal policies have been built on disciplining racial / gender/sexual "others" is well articulated (though not new.) However, her concluding prediction that the effort to "discipline the troops" struggling against neoliberalism will fail was an overly-optimistic one in 2003 - when the total sell-out of the anti-war movement to the John Kerry campaign was about to happen. Also, it's striking to read a book dedicated to bringing together cultural and economic politics against neoliberalism that makes so little mention of union activism.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Duggan argues for a hybrid politics that goes beyond the split between the "cultural" and "redistributive" left, noting that complaints about "identity politics" as not attempting to critique capitalism are based on reductive and bad history. Although Duggan doesn't deny that identity politics can be used to put a shine on capital, she shows how the most effective critics of such policies are often those who work from the standpoint of identity. Duggan argues for a hybrid politics that goes beyond the split between the "cultural" and "redistributive" left, noting that complaints about "identity politics" as not attempting to critique capitalism are based on reductive and bad history. Although Duggan doesn't deny that identity politics can be used to put a shine on capital, she shows how the most effective critics of such policies are often those who work from the standpoint of identity.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Phillip

    An interesting, concise, and (largely) convincing volume about the politics of neoliberalism--a major force in contemporary ideology--and the failure of leftists (read democratic, progressive activists and thinkers) to combat neoliberalism. Very highly recommended for anyone interested in feminism/gender studies, marxism, leftist/activist politics, or any kind of ideological conflict.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Evan Woodward

    A quick, incisive read that situates the struggle against neoliberalism within cultural studies, which is an angle I hadnt seen before. A good companion if David Harvey has got you down.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Great book for social inequality

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ash

    intelligent and lucid.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Keith Wheeles

    The book takes on singe-issue liberalism (identity politics, concerns over concentration of corporate power, privatization, deregulation, etc.) and argues for integration of progressive liberal causes as the best hope for change. And it makes a compelling case. At times fascinating, at times a little 'inside baseball' for me - I'm not as steeped in the cause and language and a few of the distinctions seemed a bit arcane to me. The book takes on singe-issue liberalism (identity politics, concerns over concentration of corporate power, privatization, deregulation, etc.) and argues for integration of progressive liberal causes as the best hope for change. And it makes a compelling case. At times fascinating, at times a little 'inside baseball' for me - I'm not as steeped in the cause and language and a few of the distinctions seemed a bit arcane to me.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    When it first came out, I was a little skeptical of what felt like an extreme position. 17 years on, and it looks not only prescient, but maybe even too optimistic.

  16. 5 out of 5

    amy

    Valuable history of [some aspects of] the 90s via not-so-distant political analysis.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Joshie

    Succinct and important

  18. 5 out of 5

    Bucket

    duggan says:'this is a book for intellectuals and activists, gay and straight, interested in how the highly successful rhetorical maneuvers of neoliberalism have functioned and seeking a way to revitalize and unify progressive politics in the US today'translation:even if you've done your homework on liberalism, neoliberalism, and progressive politics of the last 60 years AND have reference points for obscure academics like judith butler, michael foucault, nancy fraser, and others, be prepared fo duggan says:'this is a book for intellectuals and activists, gay and straight, interested in how the highly successful rhetorical maneuvers of neoliberalism have functioned and seeking a way to revitalize and unify progressive politics in the US today'translation:even if you've done your homework on liberalism, neoliberalism, and progressive politics of the last 60 years AND have reference points for obscure academics like judith butler, michael foucault, nancy fraser, and others, be prepared for some thick WAYYY verbose writing sandwiched between a decently well-articulated introduction and, well, nothing at all. it's more like toast with stuff on it than a sandwich, really. interesting stuff, at times tasty stuff, but ultimately not-worth-the-headache stuff. my faculty sponsor recommended this, otherwise i would have read the first two pages, had a soothing cup of herbal tea, and passed it on to a grad student.consider yourself warned.---- a half star for a good thesis, one cloud for unrelenting loftiness and a conspicuously absent conclusion. at least it was only 90 pages.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    This book will always be the book that I started reading in a tattoo shop, but other than that, it's not very memorable. After seeing the book cited in various articles, I found it terribly underwhelming. There are significantly better books and articles written about neoliberalism and about neoliberalism as it interacts with identity politics. Maybe the book was more groundbreaking in 2003 when it was written? Nonetheless, her critique of neoliberalism feels very unoriginal at this point. Furth This book will always be the book that I started reading in a tattoo shop, but other than that, it's not very memorable. After seeing the book cited in various articles, I found it terribly underwhelming. There are significantly better books and articles written about neoliberalism and about neoliberalism as it interacts with identity politics. Maybe the book was more groundbreaking in 2003 when it was written? Nonetheless, her critique of neoliberalism feels very unoriginal at this point. Further, her writing is often unacademic and at even more times condescending. Her discussion of the works of other authors is constantly aggressive, reductive, dismissive, and condescending even as she critiques those their presence in these other works, presenting a very hypocritical, underwhelming, unkind, and much less than academic discussion of other texts. I was thoroughly disappointed.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Linus Thomas

    Quick read that does show how neoliberalism, in it's many forms and guises, does attack both democracy and the Left. The blatant attack on simple things highlights the major issues within society today -- free speech ain't so free and neither is privacy -- and gives some suggestion on how we can resolve this. The language isn't necessarily in layman's terms as it is written from an academia position so it can be somewhat a challenge to get through the meager 88 pages but it is informative if one Quick read that does show how neoliberalism, in it's many forms and guises, does attack both democracy and the Left. The blatant attack on simple things highlights the major issues within society today -- free speech ain't so free and neither is privacy -- and gives some suggestion on how we can resolve this. The language isn't necessarily in layman's terms as it is written from an academia position so it can be somewhat a challenge to get through the meager 88 pages but it is informative if one takes the time.

  21. 5 out of 5

    b bb bbbb bbbbbbbb

    Liked: there were some thoughtful ideas, but very little substantial or worthwhile follow through. i like the general premise, which is about recognizing and supporting good aspects in different organizing strategies instead of allowing the differences to degenerate into infighting and paralysis.. Disliked: for a book expressing such a strong desire to break down barriers it was ironically inaccessible. there was a consistant failure to define academic and activist jargon. the author routinely f Liked: there were some thoughtful ideas, but very little substantial or worthwhile follow through. i like the general premise, which is about recognizing and supporting good aspects in different organizing strategies instead of allowing the differences to degenerate into infighting and paralysis.. Disliked: for a book expressing such a strong desire to break down barriers it was ironically inaccessible. there was a consistant failure to define academic and activist jargon. the author routinely fell into traps which they criticized others about.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Garrett Hoffman

    A good primer to neoliberalism as it exists in the social in the US - IMO, supplement with Harvey and Ong. Readable and quick, though.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kenz Hart

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bernadette Snell

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ricky Frawley

  26. 5 out of 5

    Nicola

  27. 5 out of 5

    Norman

  28. 4 out of 5

    Ben

  29. 4 out of 5

    Albert

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.