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To Taste Temptation

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From Book 1: EVEN THE MOST REFINED LADY Lady Emeline Gordon is the model of sophistication in London's elite social circles, always fashionable and flawlessly appropriate. As such, she is the perfect chaperone for Rebecca, the young sister of a successful Boston businessman and former Colonial soldier. CRAVES AN UNTAMED MAN Samuel Hartley may be wealthy, but his manners are a From Book 1: EVEN THE MOST REFINED LADY Lady Emeline Gordon is the model of sophistication in London's elite social circles, always fashionable and flawlessly appropriate. As such, she is the perfect chaperone for Rebecca, the young sister of a successful Boston businessman and former Colonial soldier. CRAVES AN UNTAMED MAN Samuel Hartley may be wealthy, but his manners are as uncivilized as the American wilderness he was raised in. Who wears moccasins to a grand ball? His arrogant disregard for propriety infuriates Emeline, even as his boldness excites her. TO RELEASE HER PASSION . . . But beneath Samuel's rakish manner, he is haunted by tragedy. He has come to London to settle a score, not to fall in love. And as desperately as Emeline longs to feel this shameless man's hands upon her, to taste those same lips he uses to tease her, she must restrain herself. She is not free. But some things are beyond a lady's control . . .


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From Book 1: EVEN THE MOST REFINED LADY Lady Emeline Gordon is the model of sophistication in London's elite social circles, always fashionable and flawlessly appropriate. As such, she is the perfect chaperone for Rebecca, the young sister of a successful Boston businessman and former Colonial soldier. CRAVES AN UNTAMED MAN Samuel Hartley may be wealthy, but his manners are a From Book 1: EVEN THE MOST REFINED LADY Lady Emeline Gordon is the model of sophistication in London's elite social circles, always fashionable and flawlessly appropriate. As such, she is the perfect chaperone for Rebecca, the young sister of a successful Boston businessman and former Colonial soldier. CRAVES AN UNTAMED MAN Samuel Hartley may be wealthy, but his manners are as uncivilized as the American wilderness he was raised in. Who wears moccasins to a grand ball? His arrogant disregard for propriety infuriates Emeline, even as his boldness excites her. TO RELEASE HER PASSION . . . But beneath Samuel's rakish manner, he is haunted by tragedy. He has come to London to settle a score, not to fall in love. And as desperately as Emeline longs to feel this shameless man's hands upon her, to taste those same lips he uses to tease her, she must restrain herself. She is not free. But some things are beyond a lady's control . . .

30 review for To Taste Temptation

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jilly

    Elizabeth Hoyt is a hit-or-miss author for me. I have rated her books 5-stars, and one of them I gave 2-stars. This one, though, ugh.... is there a negative star yet? Yet, I will read the next one in the series because I think the problems in this book were unique to the characters. There was nothing wrong with the writing itself. Plus, I liked the couple who is set-up for the next book. So, the problems: Cheating!! Cheating everywhere! The heroine is engaged throughout the book and yet is screwin Elizabeth Hoyt is a hit-or-miss author for me. I have rated her books 5-stars, and one of them I gave 2-stars. This one, though, ugh.... is there a negative star yet? Yet, I will read the next one in the series because I think the problems in this book were unique to the characters. There was nothing wrong with the writing itself. Plus, I liked the couple who is set-up for the next book. So, the problems: Cheating!! Cheating everywhere! The heroine is engaged throughout the book and yet is screwing the new guy. Oh, and the new guy is an old army buddy of her fiance and they are becoming closer friends throughout the book. As he sleeps with the guy's fiance. So, both of them were cheating on him. Then, at one point they have an engagement party and the other-man attacks the fiance and beats the shit out of him. Um..... you do know that YOU are the bad guy here, right??? The next problem? Her body betrayed her. Please, God, save us from this trope! Both the heroine, and the hero, ruminate endlessly about how the "animal magnetism" takes over and they aren't in control of their actions. Give me a break! In other words, you aren't to blame for cheating because your bodies wouldn't stop even when your minds said to? Is this supposed to legitimize the act? Wait, would this work in a courtroom?Because, you know, my mind says not to stab idiots, but my body has grabbed a knife and is heading towards idiots. What can I do? Then there was the Dubious consent When a woman says "no", the answer is "no". Why is this so hard to understand? Are we really still struggling for female authors to stop making non-consent romantic? Why the fuck do I even need to say this? At one point, the guy (cheater-hero) tells the girl (cheater-heroine) that he is going to come into her bedroom that night at a house party and if she locks the door or tries to deny him he will yell and make sure everyone knows that she cheated. Her fiance is also there. He threatened to expose her and shame her if she didn't let him fuck her. Um.... that's rape, dude. But, don't worry, she wants it. She was asking for it. You should have seen her dress! Slut! Yeah, so obviously this one didn't work for me. But, I haven't lost faith in the author. She's usually pretty good. And, I don't mind a little bodice-ripping, just as long as she's okay with it. Plus, you know, would it kill the guy to just undo the damn thing properly? Those things don't sew themselves back together. oh, okay. I'll make an exception for you, kitty.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Duchess Nicole

    “There are no heroes on the battlefield, my lady; there are only survivors.” Let me say that I am a bit of a fangirl about anything Elizabeth Hoyt writes. I may be a bit biased. I think she is a master at sexual tension, so if you like a smooth, slow build up to a very enjoyable, lustfully delicious climax, GO HERE. That being said, Hoyt also writes such a fabulous STORY. This is a Historical Romance with some meat on it's bones. It makes you think, it transports you with just a few words from s “There are no heroes on the battlefield, my lady; there are only survivors.” Let me say that I am a bit of a fangirl about anything Elizabeth Hoyt writes. I may be a bit biased. I think she is a master at sexual tension, so if you like a smooth, slow build up to a very enjoyable, lustfully delicious climax, GO HERE. That being said, Hoyt also writes such a fabulous STORY. This is a Historical Romance with some meat on it's bones. It makes you think, it transports you with just a few words from sixteenth century England to early American colonies, during the French and Indian war. War is always brutal, but especially when it was so hand to hand and personal as it was back then. I am fast becoming enamored of any Historical romance set in Colonial America. I love my country, and even though it may have been founded by my ancestors and wrongfully settled, it's still my country and it's still my history. I loved Pamela Clare's UntamedSurrenderDefiant for that very reason. Both sides are shown, and yes, I realize that it's romanticized. But it still leaves an impact and piques my interest. While the war is the background for this particular book, it's not the focal point. The entirety of this story aside from a few flashbacks is set in England. It deals with Samuel's quest to root out the person who gave information about his regiment to the French, which led to their massacre. While hunting down a fellow soldier, he comes across Lady Evangeline, sister to a fallen comrade. She is also engaged to be married and besides, Samuel Hartley isn't a titled Lord but a common rich man from the Colonies. Of course, their passion and chemistry is off the charts, dominating most of their encounters but left much to their imaginations because they both realize the futility of their attraction. Emaline is a lady of the ton. She's a snob, to be blunt, but once again Hoyt's characterization also makes her relatable. She's a product of her upbringing, but she's not a bigot. She realizes her attraction and though she tries to stay away, her position as a chaperone to Samuel's sister makes it impossible to stay away from him. Especially when he decides to stay close to her in order to explore their feelings. Sensual, sexy, and captivating, this is more evidence of what makes me love Elizabeth Hoyt!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sam (AMNReader)

    This was a quick read. I enjoyed the book, as I usually do with hers but can't see revisiting it This was a quick read. I enjoyed the book, as I usually do with hers but can't see revisiting it

  4. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    I've already read (and really enjoyed) the third book in this series (I don't remember why I started there), but I'm glad of it. Because if this had been the first book I'd read, I probably wouldn't have continued reading this series. There's nothing major wrong with the writing, just a bunch of personal deal-breakers all in one book. (view spoiler)[ 1) The heroine was engaged for 90% of the book. No. Just. No. I know she didn't love the man and he had his mistresses on the side, but if you're enga I've already read (and really enjoyed) the third book in this series (I don't remember why I started there), but I'm glad of it. Because if this had been the first book I'd read, I probably wouldn't have continued reading this series. There's nothing major wrong with the writing, just a bunch of personal deal-breakers all in one book. (view spoiler)[ 1) The heroine was engaged for 90% of the book. No. Just. No. I know she didn't love the man and he had his mistresses on the side, but if you're engaged to someone, you don't go around screwing someone he's friends with. They had sex multiple times while she was engaged (and at some point he actually found out and and decided not to give a damn), and not once did she give him any reason to think that she actually considered a relationship with him because she thought of him as an uncivilized idiot from the Colonies. Plus, I never liked the heroine because she was very stuck up and only interested in class and rank, and while that might be accurate for the time, I don't see how he "fell in love" with her despite being insulted and played hot and cold the entire time. It's only at the very end that she suddenly decides she loves him, and out of nowhere decides to just go to America with him. I'm sorry, but I didn't buy that. 2) The "romance" I'm sorry, but I don't find this particular "animal lust" stuff romantic. Tasting blood during kisses, scratching, and ignoring being slapped and told to go away because he just "has to have her" up against a wall, are not my idea of romance, especially when that is all there is between the couple. They would make out, she would remember that she wants a "dignified, civilized" man, she would treat him like crap, he would ignore her wishes and make out with her anyway... Yeah. Not my thing. Then there was the aforementioned engagement. Somewhere around 80% the heroine and the hero of the second book in the series publically announce their long-standing engagement, and out of nowhere (since he knew about this) the hero runs up to the fiancé, breaks his nose, there's blood everywhere... And she still sleeps with him after that? Sorry, but I just don't get it. I thought both men deserved better. 3) The "find the villain" plot The only reason the hero has come to England is to find the man who betrayed his regiment, which ended in a slaughter of half the army. I don't know how that was so difficult, because I thought it was blatantly obvious who the traitor was from the very first time he was introduced. That just dragged on too much for me (there were a few bodies, and an attempt to abduct both the heroine and the hero's sister). Again, nothing big, but I just didn't care because I already knew who the bad guy was. (hide spoiler)] I also have doubts about the second book in this series. While I would like to see Jasper matched with someone who's actually nice, he treated the woman he will end up with like she was invisible in this book. The heroine actually accused him of not even seeing her best friend here, and I'm not sure I want to see him suddenly realize that this totally average girl (who I'm guessing has been in love with him all along) is what he really wants. It's just not something I'm terribly fond of. Maybe this series just really isn't for me and To Beguile a Beast was a lucky exception. Or my tastes changed drastically over the last year...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Julie (jjmachshev)

    I think we all enjoy reminiscing on fairy tales from our youth. The downtrodden heroine saved by what turns out to be a handsome prince. At least, those are the fairy tales of my youth before the era of political correctness. I even remember when either Cinderella or Snow White was re-released by Disney in the 80’s and women’s groups were encouraging mothers with daughters to boycott the film because it taught girls to “wait for a man to rescue them”. Uh… hello? IT’S A FAIRY TALE! Anyway, that’s I think we all enjoy reminiscing on fairy tales from our youth. The downtrodden heroine saved by what turns out to be a handsome prince. At least, those are the fairy tales of my youth before the era of political correctness. I even remember when either Cinderella or Snow White was re-released by Disney in the 80’s and women’s groups were encouraging mothers with daughters to boycott the film because it taught girls to “wait for a man to rescue them”. Uh… hello? IT’S A FAIRY TALE! Anyway, that’s part of what was enjoyable about Elizabeth Hoyt’s books is her inclusion of a fairy tale within the story and somewhat mirroring plot lines. She continues this tradition with her new series, The Legend of the Four Soldiers and this first novel, “To Taste Temptation.” Our first fairy tale soldier is Iron Heart, mirrored by our book hero Samuel Hartley. He’s a wealthy, successful, rakish, and “uncivilized” businessman from the Colonies who isn’t ashamed of his humble beginnings. His backwoods background enabled him to act as a scout for the British in the French and Indian War, and it was there he served with our heroine’s brother. He’s come to England ostensibly on business, but in reality to identify the villain who betrayed their Regiment which resulted in a massacre that very few survived. Samuel finagles an introduction to our heroine, Lady Emeline Gordon, whose brother was one of the officers killed in the massacre. She also serves as a chaperone for young ladies navigating the ton. Samuel has brought his sister, Rebecca with him and soon maneuvers Emeline into acting as her chaperone. He’s also soon maneuvering Emeline into a shockingly passionate affaire. Emeline is the picture of titled British sophistication. She’s also been deeply affected by the death of her much-loved husband, brother, and father in short succession. This has left her with an ageing Aunt, a young son, and all the cares and burdens associated with acting as head of the family. She’s lost the ability to trust, is frightened to love, and is perfectly willing to settle for a secure marriage without passion…until Samuel. He’s wrong for her in every way, and she’s everything he is not. So why, oh why, is he the only one who sees her as she truly is? Who understands her? Who can pull these confusing, exasperating, exciting emotions from her so easily? Is she willing to give up her life in the ton? Each chapter of the book begins with a snippet from the story of Iron Heart and the progress of the mystery and the relationship between our lead characters seems to in some way echo our fairy tale. It’s a story within a story within a story. There’s a truly American budding romance between two secondary characters and I think I caught a glimpse of one, if not two, of our future soldiers. I’ll be waiting for their stories too.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Janet Newport

    26% in.... I just couldn't go on. If she was any stiffer or colder, she'd be a corpse. He was so disconnected (but smirking) I thought he was there by accident -- got lost on his way to a different story. Enough 26% in.... I just couldn't go on. If she was any stiffer or colder, she'd be a corpse. He was so disconnected (but smirking) I thought he was there by accident -- got lost on his way to a different story. Enough

  7. 5 out of 5

    Fani *loves angst*

    The beginning was a little slow but nice. However, from the moment they consummated their relationship, the heroine turned from prudish to shrewish. As the story moved on, I liked her less and less and in the end I couldn't understand why the hero fell in love with her. I think she needed to grovel a lot, if this was to be a 4 star book. Regretably, she didn't. The beginning was a little slow but nice. However, from the moment they consummated their relationship, the heroine turned from prudish to shrewish. As the story moved on, I liked her less and less and in the end I couldn't understand why the hero fell in love with her. I think she needed to grovel a lot, if this was to be a 4 star book. Regretably, she didn't.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mojca

    To Taste Temptation (Legend of the Four Soldiers Series #1) Lady Emeline Gordon is astonished as a tall, devilishly handsome man strolls into a posh London parlor wearing a strange attire, and approaches her with the request for her to be his younger sister's sponsor in Society.   Of course, his sister's entrance in the aristocratic circles is merely pretense. Samuel Hartley is hell-bent on discovering the lowlife who had betrayed the English troupes six years ago, leading them to slaughter at the To Taste Temptation (Legend of the Four Soldiers Series #1) Lady Emeline Gordon is astonished as a tall, devilishly handsome man strolls into a posh London parlor wearing a strange attire, and approaches her with the request for her to be his younger sister's sponsor in Society.   Of course, his sister's entrance in the aristocratic circles is merely pretense. Samuel Hartley is hell-bent on discovering the lowlife who had betrayed the English troupes six years ago, leading them to slaughter at the hands of bloodthirsty American natives.   Little do Emeline and Sam suspect that their bargain would soon turn into something more...Meh.   While the book started off strong with the quest for the traitor it quickly dissolved into a series of almost nonsensical events, mixed with male-sweat-smelling, rough (and at the beginning) non-consensual sex, midnight jogs in moccasins, and an extremely shallow heroine.   While the authors depiction of Emeline was probably an illustration of the aristocratic shallowness of that time, the attempt fell short and merely succeeded in making the heroine appear petty.   In the second part of the novel I just couldn't stand her anymore with her looking down her nose at everyone who wasn't her social equal and her snide remarks. She was horrible!   Sam, on the other hand, was your average HR hero with some added "bonuses" that made him stand out from the lot. I could've done with a little less sniffing, though.   The supporting cast was mediocre at best, the villain too easily spotted from the very beginning. The plot, though no overly slow, didn't offer much - Ms. Hoyt should've stuck with the initial story-line and build the romance around it to complement the whole and not let the romance take over. I might have closed an eye on that, if the romance was something to talk about, but like the rest of the book, that too was quite "uneventful" and mediocre.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Pamela(AllHoney)

    The first in the Legend of the Four Soldiers series and my first book by Elizabeth Hoyt. I'm not sure why I avoided her. I saw her on many favorite lists and recommendations but I'd been "burnt" before, trying books that didn't appeal to me. But this one was a winner and keeper for me. This one has an "across the tracks" theme/plot to it. Beautiful young lady of the ton meets the rugged backwoodsman from the colonies. I loved the characters and the flow and will be continuously looking for more The first in the Legend of the Four Soldiers series and my first book by Elizabeth Hoyt. I'm not sure why I avoided her. I saw her on many favorite lists and recommendations but I'd been "burnt" before, trying books that didn't appeal to me. But this one was a winner and keeper for me. This one has an "across the tracks" theme/plot to it. Beautiful young lady of the ton meets the rugged backwoodsman from the colonies. I loved the characters and the flow and will be continuously looking for more by this author.

  10. 4 out of 5

    WhiskeyintheJar

    Why is it that when someone is rich it's always "as rich as Croesus"? Shameful how Midas is ignored I tell you. Excuse me just 10 pages later Samuel is richer than King Midas.   Only on the third or so page and Emeline shows such promise by these two lines "She suppressed a shiver. Intelligent men were so hard to manage." hahaha!   Emeline struck me as very cold at first, but just average English lady mannerisms? I think Emeline is too accurate of a portrayal of an English woman for me. She is so r Why is it that when someone is rich it's always "as rich as Croesus"? Shameful how Midas is ignored I tell you. Excuse me just 10 pages later Samuel is richer than King Midas.   Only on the third or so page and Emeline shows such promise by these two lines "She suppressed a shiver. Intelligent men were so hard to manage." hahaha!   Emeline struck me as very cold at first, but just average English lady mannerisms? I think Emeline is too accurate of a portrayal of an English woman for me. She is so reserved! There are little wants and desire that eek out in Samuel's presence I just need more of them to surface to connect with Emeline.   Oh God love when Rebecca (Samuel's sister) asks the footman if her dress is cut too low and blurts out "the maid doesn't mind her boobies hanging out.." So funny. Definitely feel like there is something up with that footman hmmm.   After Samuel confronts Jasper (the man he thinks is responsible for the attack on their regiment) at a ball and then goes back to Emeline's home they have an argument in the sitting room. Here is where I finally felt the heat between this couple. Or maybe it was simply completion of all the stand-offish meetings with wanting communicated just between the eyes. Whatever it was these two characters finally popped for me.   Liked how Emeline complains that Samuel not conforming to English customs is all to annoy her. Also quite enjoyed Emeline's friend Melisande, had the most wonderful dry sense of humor. (Melisande is the star of the next book)   Heartbreaking storyline of soldiers and how they deal with the aftermath of war. The author did a commendable job of showing how each one handles it differently but still all the same with too much seen eyes that are haunted.   Wowza Emeline and Samuel's first sex scene was hot! I think the author tried to set it up with them being cold and arguing with each other, which I got, but I didn't feel it was quite the incredible "moment" it could have been or I have read before. You know how sometimes when you read a sex scene between the characters and you're like "Finally!"? Samuel and Emeline arguing, being a little rough with each other, definitely added some spice to it and the um, cough/blush, descriptive words brought heat to the scene. Samuel and Emeline's sex scene was so passionate I just wish their relationship would have felt the same to me, so close but just lacking, maybe in interaction they don’t seem to be the star of the show but rather Samuel's search for who betrayed him and his regiment during the French and Indian War. Which by the way not to be to picky, but wouldn't the English have called it the Seven Year's War? American's called it the French and Indian War so Samuel saying it makes sense but all the English people saying does not. (My history background rearing its ugly head) The author used some words and descriptions that I'd call on the risqué side or maybe I'm just not used to this kind of talk in regency stories? This book is definitely not for people who shy away from or can't handle some naughty talk. (icky these two sentences sound kind of prudish)   Samuel and Emeline really love to hate each other. She could slap him, he could roughly grip her arm, and then bam they are going at it like mad little bunnies. Great sexual friction/chemistry between these two. Would have been an A book if with that same sexual friction/chemistry there was great cognitive interaction.   The author started each chapter with a snippet from a legend called "Iron Heart". I was surprised how much I liked this technique and how much it added to the story and the development of Samuel's character. I almost wanted to read ahead to finish this story within the story.   The ending was a tad anti-climatic. They caught the traitor, they didn't catch the traitor? All I know is that Ms. Hoyt better continue the storyline of Rebecca and O'Hare or I will be pissed! (I still think something funny is up with that footman. He seemed to have more of an accent when he talked with Rebecca. When he was with Samuel and Vale searching for Rebecca and Emeline he spoke in proper English. Maybe it was an author mistake and I am just driving myself crazy with theories) ****(Spoiler)**** (Turns out I was wrong SHOCKING! I have actually read this whole series, preparing for the Olympics so I can watch the men's hockey and not get behind on reading/updating my blog which I've been doing lately. Anyway, O'Hare is alas just a footman and we the poor readers hear nothing about them until the last book in the series and it is only for like 5 sentences. BOOOOOOOOOOOOOO!)   I would probably describe this story as first a drama and then romance. There are a lot of intangibles in this story which I highly enjoyed. I liked it because it was original but Emeline was a little too cold for me (hush to the people who say this is a more historically accurate portrayal of an English woman during the time period) and Samuel never struck a cord with me. I quite honestly liked Rebecca and O'Hare better and could have read more about them. If you're looking for some scorching booty scenes though this book has that just start reading about 100 pages from the end ;)

  11. 4 out of 5

    Juliana Philippa

    Admittedly did not get very far, but the heroine didn't appeal to me and with so many books out there to read, why waste time on one where I was pretty sure I wouldn't like one of the main characters? Ended up picking up Book 2 in the series instead ( To Seduce A Sinner ), which was unbelievably good and ranks as my favorite historical romance of all-time, so all worked out well for me in the end :-). Am actually very pleased that I'm starting to be able to do this DNF thing, which used to lite Admittedly did not get very far, but the heroine didn't appeal to me and with so many books out there to read, why waste time on one where I was pretty sure I wouldn't like one of the main characters? Ended up picking up Book 2 in the series instead ( To Seduce A Sinner ), which was unbelievably good and ranks as my favorite historical romance of all-time, so all worked out well for me in the end :-). Am actually very pleased that I'm starting to be able to do this DNF thing, which used to literally be impossible for me - just could not bring myself to do it: once I started, I had to finish. (May 2011)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Lisa (Remarkablylisa)

    I can't wait this one. I'm so disappointed??? Maybe I'll try again next time because the cover is gorgeous but this one was soooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo bland and boring. DNF at 50% I can't wait this one. I'm so disappointed??? Maybe I'll try again next time because the cover is gorgeous but this one was soooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo bland and boring. DNF at 50%

  13. 5 out of 5

    Daniella

    Oh, my. I can't believe I'm saying this, but To Taste Temptation was just extremely disappointing. It was almost excruciating in its slowness, and half the time I was just wondering if something even remotely interesting would happen soon. There were so many unnecessary scenes that, if cut from the story, would have made it slightly better. But noooooo, we had to hear about Emeline doing this, or Sam doing that, or Emeline's son saying whatnot. I also had a few issues about the characters. Up t Oh, my. I can't believe I'm saying this, but To Taste Temptation was just extremely disappointing. It was almost excruciating in its slowness, and half the time I was just wondering if something even remotely interesting would happen soon. There were so many unnecessary scenes that, if cut from the story, would have made it slightly better. But noooooo, we had to hear about Emeline doing this, or Sam doing that, or Emeline's son saying whatnot. I also had a few issues about the characters. Up to a certain portion of the story--at around the 30-40% marker, I think--I found out that Emeline was actually engaged. What? She never gave any indication that she was engaged. You would think that a betrothed woman would be more disciplined in her thoughts or actions, especially towards other men. But Emeline just acted as though she was free for the taking. Yes, it wasn't a love match, but still, what she did and how she thought about Sam were practically cheating (at least by my definition of cheating). Others may feel differently about this but I, for one, felt really betrayed. What's worse, the man she was betrothed to was the one her best friend loved. Yes, I might as well go on and reveal it. I'm talking about Jasper and Melisande, the primary characters in the next book in the series. This just felt wrong in so many levels. Call me a prude, but my personal code of honor dictates that "one must not covet thy best friend's lover under any circumstances." Under any circumstances. I absolutely hate, hate, hate it when a woman falls for her best friend's man. I don't give a damn if it was under weird circumstances or whatever, I just hate it. Oh, it didn't help that Emeline was such a stuck up aristocratic bitch who busied herself by looking down on Sam from under her nose. He's a colonial. He's an American. He came from the New World. He battled wild Indians. OKAY, OKAY, WE GET IT, WOMAN. YOU DON'T NEED TO MENTION THAT EVERY DAMN CHAPTER. Ugh. I am so done with this shit. I'm just hoping that Melisande and Jasper's book would soothe my angered soul.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joanna Loves Reading

    I did drop this a star in rereading but I do still enjoy it. Will try to add more later.

  15. 5 out of 5

    ᑭᑌᑎƳᗩ [Punya Reviews...]

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. My review contains spoilers and they're mostly my thoughts as I went with the book. This one's got 2 parts. It took me quite a while to connect with this one but now, after more than halfway through the book, I think I'm beginning to like it. The hero, Samuel aka Sam is a nice guy, an American ex-soldier who is tortured by PTSD after a tragic massacre 6 yrs ago. The heroine is Lady Emeline, sister of the one of the soldiers, who was a comrade alongside Sam and died in the same massacre in America My review contains spoilers and they're mostly my thoughts as I went with the book. This one's got 2 parts. It took me quite a while to connect with this one but now, after more than halfway through the book, I think I'm beginning to like it. The hero, Samuel aka Sam is a nice guy, an American ex-soldier who is tortured by PTSD after a tragic massacre 6 yrs ago. The heroine is Lady Emeline, sister of the one of the soldiers, who was a comrade alongside Sam and died in the same massacre in America. Sam is in London to find out what happened that day. Now, the book has a lot of history of a 1758 massacre, a bloody battle with the Indians. I was never good at memorizing history so, such complex stuff *makes funny face here* is beyond my reach! lolz I tried to glean something out of Wiki since I had no idea about such incident. I won't comment on the real event, just what's in the book. As I was saying, Sam is in London to investigate what happened that day. He brought his sister Rebecca with him but she has no idea why her brother's here. A lots happening here, the relationship between the brother and the sister. Sam, after their parents died, left Becca with his uncle and his family. Didn't see her more than twice a year. Becca always thinks she maybe a burden to her brother, with whom she doesn't have a close relationship etc etc, which begin to change later in the story. Then Sam meets Lady Emeline, who's St. Aubyn's sister and a widow. I'll be straight here when I say that at first, I didn't like Emeline at all. She was snappish, snobbish, an aristocrat to the bone. I didn't like that she's aloof with her 8 yr old son. It seemed she's always cranky! Always snapping at Sam and reminding him how low his status is in the London society standard. But, as the story progressed I saw a woman, who actually loved her 1st husband, a young love, who left her alone by dying according to her; she is afraid to feel the same for another man for the fear of losing him, too. Her whole attitude is mostly what she's been born and bred for, an aristocrat to boot and whatever that was drummed in her head from the childhood, along with her hidden vulnerabilities. Although I didn't like her attitude at first, I begin to understand where she stands. And, the glimpse of the hidden woman who wants to be wild, likes to do things just for fun, who wants to dote on her child but can't, is revealed throughout the chapters. Sam is nice overall but he knows what he wants. And he wants Emeline, even knowing her social standing. Although their views and opinions clash more often than not (ie: Sam's love for moccasins which pisses Emeline off in the beginning), they can't just deny the attraction. Emeline is scared, Sam is determined. So, when Sam hires Emeline to teach Becca of social rapport and stuffs (Emeline chaperons other debutantes in London as well) to make her introduction easier, Emeline at first denies but then gave in to Sam's perseverance. And they came closer. Emeline isn't only attracted but actually likes Sam a lot, no matter how she shows it and her son Daniel, who's named after his late father, is also very fond of Sam. Sam returns the feeling, too. Here, there are a lot of twists. One is, Sam thought, another soldier, Jasper aka Viscount Vale, was involved in the betrayal. But, it is soon revealed that he wasn't. Then the two set out to investigate together. One soldier, Thornton gave them some clues. Though they don't trust the men, they still sought out the few men who survived that bloody day and, found all of them dead; killed or by suicide. Along the course, it is also revealed that Vale is Emeline's fiance, although their understanding isn't official. Emeline knows Vale since childhood. She doesn't love him but wants this marriage of convenience for the reasons I've already mentioned. Sam is angry, he didn't expect that but he can't stop himself from wanting her. At present, they're attending a house party. They came here to talk to one of the men but found he committed suicide. Both men are sad, frustrated and depressed. Sam likes to run for miles ... I don't know how to explain it ... maybe from his demons of the war. There were scenes, him running through London streets at night to get away from his PTSD (an incident in the war is related to this running). So, after this set down, he ran and made his feet bloody while Vale drank himself to stupor. Emeline takes care of Sam and they kiss. But Sam pushes her away because he thought she's doing it out of pity. From then on, they couldn't deny it anymore and becomes lovers later. I don't know if I should be angry for I don't like it, even if it's the h/h, to cheat/betray thus. But, this situation of theirs is really complicated. Sam keeps asking Emeline why won't she marry for love and passion and was kinda set that he'd make her understand how it can be between them. The love scenes were kinda like that, Sam dominating her mostly. The last one (that I've read), Emeline actually felt very vulnerable and exposed by the intensity of it. It's actually quite understandable. She always was in charge with her husband (possibly), never lost herself like this. She never took another lover, not even Vale (who is a known rake BTW). I have to see where all these lead to. Now about the secondary characters. I love reading Melisande, Emeline's best friend, who's a spinster. Love her cynical view of things and sly wit. She's very smart, sometimes more so than Emeline IMO. It's like, the fact that men don't find her attractive enough (too brown!) doesn't bother her at all. She's mocking them always in her own way. There is something about her reminds me of myself. She's the heroine of the next book which I'm really interested to read. I like Daniel, Emeline's son, a sweet boy. Also, Tante Cristelle, Emeline's older, spinster aunt who helps Becca alongside Emeline. Last but not the least, Becca herself. I really like her and her obsession with the gorgeous Irish footman O'Hare. Yah, at some point I wanted these two to be the h/h of the story lolz. But I'm very interested to know how things far between them because I found their interactions very sweet and honest. :) ******************* Ehh, where do I start? This book went downhill since the moment Emeline decided Sam wasn't good enough for her, no matter what he does! Really????? I mean yah, I get it you're an aristocrat silly twit but I thought you'd change but nooooo! He had to fight, almost get killed twice if I might mention- onetime by Vale, the other time by the villain, to get your 'approval'! I mean c'mon woman!! I was so damned pissed off that even after everything, she decided to go through with the marriage to Vale, whom she thinks as a brother, hello?! Poor Sam, I did feel for him. The guy was already in love with her. He fought and raged and tried to make her see reasons, then almost gave up. But, couldn't entirely. I say you should've Sam, she's such a vain, shallow pain in the a$$!! Would it make me look bad if I say when the villain kidnapped them (Emeline and Rebecca), it seemed they might've gotten killed, I actually was hoping that Emeline gets killed. There, it's out! Now I feel great. Call me whatever you like but I want my heroine to be smart, the one who isn't afraid to conquer the conventions, fall in love quite dizzily with her hero and have their HEA. Not someone who is so chicken, it wasn't 'til the last chapter that she decided she wanna have a life with him, while on the other times she made excuses such as: the social status, him being a colonial (even for a colonial Sam is very rich, a self-made man FYI), a life in America (would she or not), her so-called independence, whining they always leave me alone, even to if them colonials have adequate bathing system or not! OMG!! Stupid b*tch! It's not as if she was a debutante or something ... I was agape for the last 6/7 chapters of the book, was rolling my eyes and berating Sam and asking WTF? She cried during the last love scene thinking this would be that 'one last time' (by then her and Vale's engagement was already announced and Vale and Sam fought) and show him how much she 'loves' him. Yah right! Sadly, I didn't fall for her show of 'devotion' for him. I still like Melisande, she is definitely smarter and more enjoyable than Emeline. I hope she stays that way in her book. Vale, who's supposed to be her hero, didn't impress me at all, specially all his show of fiance-ish attitude (after showing none for forever it seems) by beating and foul mouthing Sam was just too much. I wanted to kick his arse, moron! I wish there were more scenes between Becca and Gil, the footman. I'd rather read those than that twit's stupid excuses! Not much for them except that she wanted Sam to give Gil a job in America. It's not mentioned what happened to them. After reading The Serpent Prince or just The Princes Trilogy in general, I found this book to be simply a mediocre venture by EH. Lord, I really really hope the others in the series aren't like this one, the heroines specially. 3.5 stars, and I'd always think Sam deserved better. PS: I really loved the fairy tale "Iron Heart", I wish there was a book somewhere so that I can read the whole story. Have to check out. It seems, more fairy tales ahead in Ms. Hoyt's books, she loves this quite a lot. This story was another reason why I gave this book 0.5 more whereas before, I wasn't sure if I'd give it a 3 or not.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'm one of those people who loves a good romance novel and HATES a bad one. I don't ask for much, I'd like some hot sex, I want to root for the couple to be happy, and I want any side plots to make at least some vague sense. So, my expectations were not very high for this book. But I still hated it and had to skim the ending rather than finish it properly. I'm so sick of romance novels where the hero basically rapes the heroine. She says no and get out, and hits him but of course his big strong a I'm one of those people who loves a good romance novel and HATES a bad one. I don't ask for much, I'd like some hot sex, I want to root for the couple to be happy, and I want any side plots to make at least some vague sense. So, my expectations were not very high for this book. But I still hated it and had to skim the ending rather than finish it properly. I'm so sick of romance novels where the hero basically rapes the heroine. She says no and get out, and hits him but of course his big strong arms grab her fist and pull her into an embrace. No really, her body totally wanted the sex, ignore what she says. It's this odd regency double standard. I prefer regency romance to modern, there aren't enough road blocks these days. But regency writers often have a problem with reconciling how people actually acted back then without distancing the reader from the characters overmuch. The heroines are always very preocupied with class and rank, but they all seem to speak their minds and be very modern women. But then this basically rape thing happens and well honestly back then maybe men wouldn't care if no meant no. Why both? Ugh and the men never care about society. The hero always pulls some dumb move that actually would probably ostracize the woman forever, making her unmarriagable, keeping her in seclusion for a really long time, ruining her fortune and probably her life. But it's ROMANTIC, omg so no one cares! Okay, now this book specific. The hero, Sam, is from America, his naive sister needs a chaperone. He lives next door to an attractive widow, Emeline, whose brother died in the very same battle that Sam was labeled a coward from. I don't mind cliches in this genre usually, since most of the cliches are good ones. This just didn't work from the beginning. Things progress as usual, Sam has ulterior motives, he and Emeline have an unwanted attraction, Sam tries to hunt down some convoluted conspiracy. Sam admits that he took the house next to Emmeline's on purpose to find information about her brother. Then he never actually asks for information from her and that thread is left alone. Sam basically ruins his sister's chance in society by being a dumbass. Sam finds out that Emeline is secretly engaged to someone he suspected in the conspiracy, she vouches for her fiance, Sam takes her word for it, he is never suspected again. Sam has sex with Emeline even though she doesn't want it (oh but her body said yes yes yes). Emeline announces her engagement formally, and Sam, so shocked over something he already knew, bashes the guy's face in in the middle of the party, with a lot of vivid writing description of his nose breaking, gushing blood, and the feel of bone crushing under Sam's fist. The next time Emeline sees Sam, they make out. WTF? In the end, everything ties up exactly how you would expect, particularly in regards to the random characters thrown into the story because this book is part of "The Legend of the Four Soldiers", a conceit I really hate, if a character is in the book, use them, but what a waste to randomly give the heroine a best friend with two lines, an Aunt who does nothing, Sam's sister being such a flat character. There's so much more but now I'm just rambling and ranting. I told you, I HATE bad romance novels. It makes people ashamed to read the good ones.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Denise

    A great start to what looks to be another great series by Hoyt. It seems to me that a lot of the first books in a series are truly gems in their own rights or awful because of all the building up for the rest of the series. This one was closer to the gem mark. Unlike a lot of the other reviewers, I did not hate Emeline. She was exactly what she should have been for that time and place. Add to it her life events that she had faced, I could well understand why she could be such a cold bitch. Sam A great start to what looks to be another great series by Hoyt. It seems to me that a lot of the first books in a series are truly gems in their own rights or awful because of all the building up for the rest of the series. This one was closer to the gem mark. Unlike a lot of the other reviewers, I did not hate Emeline. She was exactly what she should have been for that time and place. Add to it her life events that she had faced, I could well understand why she could be such a cold bitch. Sam was also attracted to that part of her personality, so it worked. As for Sam... well yummmmm.. need I say more? I am looking forward to reading the next in this series To Seduce A Sinner the main characters, Melisande and Jasper were great secondary characters in To Taste Temptation. One of my favorite passages: Their time was over. She sighed and snuggled the blanket over her mouth. He watched the small movement greedily, drinking it in, committing it to memory. Soon. Soon now he would get up and walk to the door, leaving this room and making his way through the silent house. Let himself out into the dawn. Go back to the town house that wasn’t truly his. In two days, he would board a ship and spend over a month watching the waves as he sailed back home. And once there? Why, he’d continue his life as if he’d never met a woman named Emeline. Except, while his life might look the same from the outside, it would be entirely different on the inside. He wouldn’t forget her, his warm lady, even if he lived for six decades more. He knew that now, sitting by her cold fire. She would be with him all the days of his life. As he walked the streets of Boston, as he conducted his business or chatted with acquaintances, she would be the ghost beside him. She would sit with him as he ate, she would lie beside him as he slept. And he knew that when his time on this earth was at an end, his last thought as he entered the void would be of her. The scent of lemon balm would haunt him forever.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lisa - (Aussie Girl)

    This is the first instalment of Elizabeth Hoyt's earlier series, The Legend of the Four Soldiers. I'm not sure whether it was the prickly, aristocratic heroine or the military theme but it took me quite a while to get into this story. But once our hero, Samuel and our heroine Emaline ventured into the bedroom, Elizabeth Hoyt weaved her magic and succinctly in the second half of the book all the pieces fell together for a very satisfying read. There is no doubt that writing a sensual but still ro This is the first instalment of Elizabeth Hoyt's earlier series, The Legend of the Four Soldiers. I'm not sure whether it was the prickly, aristocratic heroine or the military theme but it took me quite a while to get into this story. But once our hero, Samuel and our heroine Emaline ventured into the bedroom, Elizabeth Hoyt weaved her magic and succinctly in the second half of the book all the pieces fell together for a very satisfying read. There is no doubt that writing a sensual but still romantic love scene is Elizabeth Hoyt's strength. I also liked the added story of the hero's sister Rebecca and her unconventional tendresse for Gil O'Hare the Irish footman. I'm hoping we see them again by the end of the series.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mia Marlowe

    Elizabeth Hoyt's To Taste Temptation has caught me in her web. Her characters aren't the usual suspects. Her heroine is a titled English widow, her hero a colonial from Boston on the trail of the man who betrayed his regiment to the Wyandots and the French. Ms. Hoyt has mastered the art of repressed passion. Her characters are so acutely aware of each other, even when they'd only shared one kiss, she had me squirming in my seat. The love scenes are remarkable and her characters are so achingly hu Elizabeth Hoyt's To Taste Temptation has caught me in her web. Her characters aren't the usual suspects. Her heroine is a titled English widow, her hero a colonial from Boston on the trail of the man who betrayed his regiment to the Wyandots and the French. Ms. Hoyt has mastered the art of repressed passion. Her characters are so acutely aware of each other, even when they'd only shared one kiss, she had me squirming in my seat. The love scenes are remarkable and her characters are so achingly human. I'm a serious fan and can't wait for To Seduce a Sinner. For more books I've enjoyed, visit http://www.emilybryan.com/Em%20recomm...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Missy

    Stopped at 78% and skimmed the rest. The book never managed to catch my interest.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    This was a slow start and got better from there. I liked that Samuel had a unique upbringing and that he loved Emmeline for her prickly mess. She didn't have to be a proper for him. "Emmeline felt a flicker of Samuel treated her as an equal and that kind of trust was curiously heady." This was a slow start and got better from there. I liked that Samuel had a unique upbringing and that he loved Emmeline for her prickly mess. She didn't have to be a proper for him. "Emmeline felt a flicker of Samuel treated her as an equal and that kind of trust was curiously heady."

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ruth

    I really enjoyed this one, although it was more mixed than others I've read by this author. The plot is a bit more routine than I expected - the repressed heroine, the hero and heroine falling in lust at first sight, lots of tea-drinking etc. And the climax of the plot really was pretty uninspired. So why do I give this 4 stars? Well, there are two reasons. No, make that three. No four. The first one is that I really loved the heroine. I've never read a historical romance before with a grumpy, crus I really enjoyed this one, although it was more mixed than others I've read by this author. The plot is a bit more routine than I expected - the repressed heroine, the hero and heroine falling in lust at first sight, lots of tea-drinking etc. And the climax of the plot really was pretty uninspired. So why do I give this 4 stars? Well, there are two reasons. No, make that three. No four. The first one is that I really loved the heroine. I've never read a historical romance before with a grumpy, crusty heroine which works, and I loved it. I love that she's really quite cross most of the time, I love that she shouts like a fishwife on occasion, and that when necessary is quite willing to wade into a fight, and enjoy it. The second reason is that this is set after the British colonial wars against the French in the US during the Seven Years War, which is too rarely used as a setting IMO. The third reason is that I like how this author writes. It just works nicely, with lots of description as well as solid dialogue, which gives you a reasonable impression of being set in the correct era. And, fourthly, this book has some of the best, super hot, smokin' quickie sex I've read in a HR. It had me nearly fanning myself on the train home from work. Now, onto the next one, and I hope this has smokin' sex too! 4 stars.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Elisa ✿

    I have to stop buying books just because the cover is cute and is on sale. This was a very meh book, the romance was actually kinda cute, but wow this book is boring.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Maureen Feeney

    Snobby Heroine. Lady Emeline Gordon (an Earls daughter) is a widow, who teaches wealthy girls the rules of etiquette and propriety in London. When her American neighbour asks her to introduce his sister to London society she agrees.Moccasin wearing Samuel Hartley, raised in America's colonial wilderness is now a wealthy Boston businessman, arrives in London seeking the traitor who betrayed the 28th Regiment into massacre by the Indians at Spinner's Falls. One of the men killed was Captain Reynaud Snobby Heroine. Lady Emeline Gordon (an Earls daughter) is a widow, who teaches wealthy girls the rules of etiquette and propriety in London. When her American neighbour asks her to introduce his sister to London society she agrees.Moccasin wearing Samuel Hartley, raised in America's colonial wilderness is now a wealthy Boston businessman, arrives in London seeking the traitor who betrayed the 28th Regiment into massacre by the Indians at Spinner's Falls. One of the men killed was Captain Reynaud, brother of widowed Emeline. He enlists the help of fellow soldier Jasper viscount Vale who happens to be betrothed to Emeline. Emeline is attracted to the wild American but society rules say that he is inferior no matter how wealthy he is. Samuel has to fight the demons in his head caused by the war, before he can allow himself to love. I was in two minds whether to rate this a 3 or 4 star. The plot is good and the sex scenes hot but I couldn't like Emeline at all. She was a cold snob that was going to marry someone else even though she knew she loved Samuel and he loved her. Why? because she was an Earls daughter and he wasn,t good enough! Samuel I liked but started getting annoyed when he continued to pursue her when she didn't want him. Wanted to scream at him to have some pride and tell her to f$#k herself. What I did like was the great plot and great secondry characters (Jasper) and the story though sometimes quite dark is told around fairy tale stories about 4 soldiers. Will definitely read the others in spite of this book.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Keri

    Another solid entry from Ms. Hoyt. This is the first of four books about 4 soldiers and each of their stories. They each take different paths and they also end up dealing with the aftermath of the war. Our first story is about Samuel. His journey takes him to England. He ended up being a go between shipper of items for the Americas. In this case, he has come to England to talk to Mr. Wedgwood about possibly shipping some pottery to the Americas. But he also has come to England to find out who wa Another solid entry from Ms. Hoyt. This is the first of four books about 4 soldiers and each of their stories. They each take different paths and they also end up dealing with the aftermath of the war. Our first story is about Samuel. His journey takes him to England. He ended up being a go between shipper of items for the Americas. In this case, he has come to England to talk to Mr. Wedgwood about possibly shipping some pottery to the Americas. But he also has come to England to find out who was the traitor that sold his regimental information that caused the deaths of so many of his fellow soldiers in an ambush. He has also come to touch base with the sister of the man that was his commander and whom he admired. Once he gets sight of Emeline his agenda takes off on a whole new direction. Emeline, however is a woman protecting her heart. She is determined that since she can't depend on anybody to stick around, so she has encased her heart in ice and no man, especially a colonial moccasin wearing, uncouth, sexy excuse for a man is going to change her mind. Sam is just as determined to melt her icy reserve and be the woman she should be. But will his love be enough to entice her from her comfortable shores of England and her self imposed exile from love. At first Emeline's actions and reserve drove me crazy, but after I got more of her background I understood better where she was coming from. At times I thought Sam pushed too much or acted like an ass, but maybe that is what Emeline needed. I can't wait to pick up the next one in the series.

  26. 5 out of 5

    PoligirlReads

    This book bites. Sorry, but there it is. It took me awhile to read, because it's pretty much just coercion-smut strung together with the vaguest pieces of a storyline. I'm actually glad I read it out of order, because if I had started with this clunker, I wouldn't have been able to finish the series. I get that he's supposed to be in "chase" mode, but Sam comes across more as a stalker-rapist. Just about every scene with the H/h consists of her saying no, and him thinking that no was just the sta This book bites. Sorry, but there it is. It took me awhile to read, because it's pretty much just coercion-smut strung together with the vaguest pieces of a storyline. I'm actually glad I read it out of order, because if I had started with this clunker, I wouldn't have been able to finish the series. I get that he's supposed to be in "chase" mode, but Sam comes across more as a stalker-rapist. Just about every scene with the H/h consists of her saying no, and him thinking that no was just the start of negotiations. Gross. No means no! He tracks her down, sneaks into her rooms, and then threatens to break down her door and cause a public scene if she refuses him. Romantic, right? Emeline isn't much better. Somehow a woman (Hoyt) managed to write a female character that completely lacks agency. Everyone around her seems to control her actions. Within her too, apparently, since that traitorous body of hers keeps ending up under Sam. Ugh, no. Just no. I'm giving one star for the PTSD aspects in this book and throughout the series. Hoyt at least did a decent job with that. Too often in HRs, the dude comes back from war perfectly fine. It's good to see a portrayal that's more realistic. I kind of liked Rebecca and O'Hare the footman, but that's about it.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dee

    This is the 2nd book I've read by Elizabeth Hoyt. I enjoyed Raven Prince very much and haven't been able to find the sequels in any book stores in my area, so I decided to start this series. Emiline came off as very uppity and snotty. I didn't like her at all and that's what ruined the book for me. Because she was such a snob, I found myself imaginging her owning slaves when her and Samuel moved to America, and I imagined she'd treat them like crap. That has absolutely nothing to do with the stor This is the 2nd book I've read by Elizabeth Hoyt. I enjoyed Raven Prince very much and haven't been able to find the sequels in any book stores in my area, so I decided to start this series. Emiline came off as very uppity and snotty. I didn't like her at all and that's what ruined the book for me. Because she was such a snob, I found myself imaginging her owning slaves when her and Samuel moved to America, and I imagined she'd treat them like crap. That has absolutely nothing to do with the storyline of To Taste Temptation, but I still found myself thinking those thoughts. Can you tell I didn't care for Emiline? Samuel wasn't interesting enough to overcome my dislike of Emiline so the story just fell flat for me. The mystery of who set up the soldiers didn't pull me in either. I was so disappointed! This book was boring! The best part about it was the Iron Heart fairy tale at the beginning of each chapter. Now, THAT was interesting. I'm going to hope for the best and finish out this series.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Netanella

    More intelligent than more historical romances, this book dealt with some unusual ideas for its genre: - The setting is not a Regency England dealing with the Napoleonic Wars, but an earlier period in English-colonial America relations shortly after the French & Indian War. - The heroes suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder as the result of a massacre and there are a few bloody details from the war. - The class distinctions of rank in English society are emphasized as our heroine, the daug More intelligent than more historical romances, this book dealt with some unusual ideas for its genre: - The setting is not a Regency England dealing with the Napoleonic Wars, but an earlier period in English-colonial America relations shortly after the French & Indian War. - The heroes suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder as the result of a massacre and there are a few bloody details from the war. - The class distinctions of rank in English society are emphasized as our heroine, the daughter of an Earl, falls in love with a visiting colonial American. All the standard elements that fans of romance love are there, of course - the unlikely lovers, the foils that keep them apart, the HEA. Hoyt's interweaving of another series of fairy tales into the heart of the story also adds a certain element of appeal that I continue to enjoy. I'll definitely follow the series to its conclusion.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Mardia

    You know, it was an interesting experience reading this book—it’s technically Fine, but the constant American Exceptionalism is really hard to take when the reality is that white settlers were able to settle in the Americas due to slavery and genocide (and if those are heavy topics to bring into a review of a historical romance, it’s also a heavy feeling to read a book where the “opportunities” of the American colonies are extolled but Native Americans are referred to as savages but the white he You know, it was an interesting experience reading this book—it’s technically Fine, but the constant American Exceptionalism is really hard to take when the reality is that white settlers were able to settle in the Americas due to slavery and genocide (and if those are heavy topics to bring into a review of a historical romance, it’s also a heavy feeling to read a book where the “opportunities” of the American colonies are extolled but Native Americans are referred to as savages but the white hero wanders around in moccasins and buckskins and is meant to be admired for it. WHAT.) Also the supposed love-hate relationship was honestly just tiring—the characters came off as childish rather than conflicted, and the rest of the supporting characters were thin as well. Just not a book that has aged well in any respect.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Gilgamesha

    I am a bit of a prude despite my love for the works of writers like Hoyt and Kleypas; therefore, I mostly skim through the more provocative love making scenes. There is a moment in this book when the heroine wakes up in the morning in the arms of her lover and he proceeds his good morning with a session of love making so intense I literally hung on to each emotion and thought and sensation that was being described. The moment was brought alive on the pages as more of a soul baring than a mere ph I am a bit of a prude despite my love for the works of writers like Hoyt and Kleypas; therefore, I mostly skim through the more provocative love making scenes. There is a moment in this book when the heroine wakes up in the morning in the arms of her lover and he proceeds his good morning with a session of love making so intense I literally hung on to each emotion and thought and sensation that was being described. The moment was brought alive on the pages as more of a soul baring than a mere physical act. It was beautiful and in it was evident the prowess of Hoyt for writing such emotionally rich scenes. That moment alone was worth the five stars I gave the book.

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