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Ultimate Fantastic Four, Volume 2: Doom

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After a bizarre experiment unexpectedly imbued them with extraordinary powers, high-school genius Reed Richards and his fellow adventurers must learn to adapt to their amazing new situation. But before they can even begin to get accustomed, former classmate Victor Van Damme - who was caught in the same experiment that gave the Fantastic Four their superhuman powers - retur After a bizarre experiment unexpectedly imbued them with extraordinary powers, high-school genius Reed Richards and his fellow adventurers must learn to adapt to their amazing new situation. But before they can even begin to get accustomed, former classmate Victor Van Damme - who was caught in the same experiment that gave the Fantastic Four their superhuman powers - returns to exact his revenge. Collecting: Ultimate Fantastic Four 7-12


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After a bizarre experiment unexpectedly imbued them with extraordinary powers, high-school genius Reed Richards and his fellow adventurers must learn to adapt to their amazing new situation. But before they can even begin to get accustomed, former classmate Victor Van Damme - who was caught in the same experiment that gave the Fantastic Four their superhuman powers - retur After a bizarre experiment unexpectedly imbued them with extraordinary powers, high-school genius Reed Richards and his fellow adventurers must learn to adapt to their amazing new situation. But before they can even begin to get accustomed, former classmate Victor Van Damme - who was caught in the same experiment that gave the Fantastic Four their superhuman powers - returns to exact his revenge. Collecting: Ultimate Fantastic Four 7-12

30 review for Ultimate Fantastic Four, Volume 2: Doom

  1. 4 out of 5

    Paul E. Morph

    I enjoyed Ellis and Immonen’s take on this concept much more than Bendis, Millar and Kurbert’s; the artwork was more to my tastes and the whole thing just felt smarter, if you know what I mean. Boy, did they ever drop the ball on Doom, though! Sheeesh! This is more proof, if any more was needed, that you simply cannot improve on Lee and Kirby’s original Dr. Doom. Jim Lee tried, two movies tried and now these guys tried... and all we got was a bunch of crappy imitations with a bunch of pointless c I enjoyed Ellis and Immonen’s take on this concept much more than Bendis, Millar and Kurbert’s; the artwork was more to my tastes and the whole thing just felt smarter, if you know what I mean. Boy, did they ever drop the ball on Doom, though! Sheeesh! This is more proof, if any more was needed, that you simply cannot improve on Lee and Kirby’s original Dr. Doom. Jim Lee tried, two movies tried and now these guys tried... and all we got was a bunch of crappy imitations with a bunch of pointless changes that ended up pushing the character into the absurd. This one is particularly bad. How anybody could have thought giving Doom silly little faun legs would be an improvement is completely beyond me... I mean, seriously; were they on crack when they came up with that?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bookwraiths

    Well, this was a bit of a step up from volume one. Warren Ellis penning a better adventure than Bendis’ updated origin story, and the art is still really cool. The only complaint I have is Dr. Doom is a bit of letdown. I guess it just comes down to the kind of villain you prefer, and I like the ominous, powerful Doom of the old FF comics over this pathetic, whiny loser Victor.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Baba

    The Ultimate Fantastic Four... you know it was coming, facing Dr Doom! Collecting Ultimate Fantastic Four #7 -12. Just a 6 out of 12 for this voloume. Art's by Stuart Immonen. The Ultimate Fantastic Four... you know it was coming, facing Dr Doom! Collecting Ultimate Fantastic Four #7 -12. Just a 6 out of 12 for this voloume. Art's by Stuart Immonen.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Gavin

    More tardy Foursome Shallow Buddyreads! Volume 2 picks up on the hunt for Victor Van Damme, and we discover that he's had to construct himself a suit of armour to cover his decaying body. He's based in a squatters area in Copenhagen, Denmark. Before we get the first showdown before him and the Four, there's some other stuff to take care of...first off: Warren Ellis is writing! He's got a different style than Bendis and Millar, less for the masses, a little more intelligent, but still highly enjoya More tardy Foursome Shallow Buddyreads! Volume 2 picks up on the hunt for Victor Van Damme, and we discover that he's had to construct himself a suit of armour to cover his decaying body. He's based in a squatters area in Copenhagen, Denmark. Before we get the first showdown before him and the Four, there's some other stuff to take care of...first off: Warren Ellis is writing! He's got a different style than Bendis and Millar, less for the masses, a little more intelligent, but still highly enjoyable. (That isn't a knock on Bendis or Millar either, I very much enjoy both men's work). But here we get explanations of scientific questions about the four that many of us would ask if we ever had the chance: Does Ben still use the potty? (Yes, but it's not pretty) How strong is he? (7 Tons of psi per hand!) What happens to Reed's organs when he shifts shapes? (Turns out he doesn't HAVE any anymore, just some lung-like remnants that oxygenates the blood!) Very cool stuff. I really liked it. Victor builds a bunch of robot insects to attack the Baxter Building, which lets Reed know he's still alive, and he's got the codes that he changed before the test that changed them all. Reed wants it at all costs, but first, they need to survive the attack. We get to see Reed as the helpless one here, with Johnny and Ben fighting and strong, Sue strong in the use of her powers (and mind, she's an internal biologist!) and pushes herself to the edge many times. We also see some jokes about names, like the Human Matchbox, and the Asbestos Thing (Ben isn't affected by heat in this version, and is also bulletproof (last volume)). We also get introduced to the Fantasti-car, which Reed built at 13, using info Tony Stark put on the internet and his own brain. Ben and Johnny mock the everloving shit out of Reed, calling everything Fantasti-something. It's a nice way to develop characters, and also keep Reed from being too high and mighty above everyone else, which was something I always found off-putting about Marvel U Reed a lot of the time. Sue's also no slouch intellectually, which I greatly enjoy! This all leads to a breakout where the Four go after Victor, and we see a showdown, only broken up by the arrival of the Army, and then the realization that he's got diplomatic immunity...as a Danish citizen... However, we see a bit more anger and action from Reed here, so it's a different direction, but I will for sure be following along with this one.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    This volume seemed to be largely concerned with character development, both of the FF and van Damme (the Doom analog). And not just character development, but defining their abilities and the changes to their bodies. Like that Reed doesn't really have internal organs anymore, just a vaguely lung-like, heart-like structure. Weird, and weirdly fascinating. Not so sure about this take on Doom, though. He seems much more unstable and delusional than 616 Doom, and I'm not sure if that's a terribly in This volume seemed to be largely concerned with character development, both of the FF and van Damme (the Doom analog). And not just character development, but defining their abilities and the changes to their bodies. Like that Reed doesn't really have internal organs anymore, just a vaguely lung-like, heart-like structure. Weird, and weirdly fascinating. Not so sure about this take on Doom, though. He seems much more unstable and delusional than 616 Doom, and I'm not sure if that's a terribly interesting place to take the character. It kind of wears down the aspects of Doom that makes him so compelling in the first place.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shadowdenizen

    Good, but a weak introduction, IMO to the Doom character.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Brittany

    "I have locked you in your own bodies! You are my subjects now!" Fantastic Four is a group I thought I'd never like. But I'm two volumes in and I want to read the entire run... Also: Doom is a badass beyond belief. I liked pretty much everything about this. Sue and Johnny and Ben were crazy good on the fighting end, and Reed offered up his bigger than life brain at every turn. The artwork was super legit. The conflict was so real. I think I'm in love. And DOOM! Not only does he have history with FF "I have locked you in your own bodies! You are my subjects now!" Fantastic Four is a group I thought I'd never like. But I'm two volumes in and I want to read the entire run... Also: Doom is a badass beyond belief. I liked pretty much everything about this. Sue and Johnny and Ben were crazy good on the fighting end, and Reed offered up his bigger than life brain at every turn. The artwork was super legit. The conflict was so real. I think I'm in love. And DOOM! Not only does he have history with FF, but he's also played the biggest trick on them all that I've ever seen. How terrifying would it be to literally be trapped inside of your own body, not knowing your abilities, the excess to which you can harm people, how to live your life as a brand new person with the same personality. Doom has done a fantastic job at making himself into a villain. And his families past is seriously interesting. The only reason this didn't get five stars is because I'm holding out until a volume SCREAMS LOVE at me. This was awesome though.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Cameron Chaney

    Doom has always been the most well-known villain of Fantastic Four, so I was expecting a pretty special volume when I saw that this was centered around him. And it was pretty good, especially the last comic in this volume with its dark visuals and epic action. The character design of Doom is more than menacing, making him the kind of guy you wouldn't want to encounter in a dark alley. Then again, you shouldn't be wondering around in a dark alley anyway. Idiot. Anyway, the design of Doom is pretty Doom has always been the most well-known villain of Fantastic Four, so I was expecting a pretty special volume when I saw that this was centered around him. And it was pretty good, especially the last comic in this volume with its dark visuals and epic action. The character design of Doom is more than menacing, making him the kind of guy you wouldn't want to encounter in a dark alley. Then again, you shouldn't be wondering around in a dark alley anyway. Idiot. Anyway, the design of Doom is pretty fantastic (haha) and so is the art. There were some pages in the finale that I had to pause and stare at for a while because they were so beautifully drawn. The story is rather 'meh, but it had its moments. The dialogue, on the other hand, was a little schizophrenic. There were times where it read just fine and made me laugh, and then there were others where I rolled my eyes or couldn't understand what the characters were talking about. Overall though, this was a fun addition to the series and I'm looking forward to continuing on. FINAL VERDICT: 3.25 stars

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mark Desrosiers

    Unwitting hippie recently tattooed by Dr. Doom: "Wow, that stings like..." Dr. Doom: "Don't touch it. The microfibers have to mate with your brain stem." Here, our chipper quartet ends up defying the U.S. military in order to confront Dr. Doom and his gang of scruffy hippies in Copenhagen (?!). Warren Ellis and Stuart Immonen perform their usual hilarious & gripping brain-stem mating here, so you won't be disappointed. Unwitting hippie recently tattooed by Dr. Doom: "Wow, that stings like..." Dr. Doom: "Don't touch it. The microfibers have to mate with your brain stem." Here, our chipper quartet ends up defying the U.S. military in order to confront Dr. Doom and his gang of scruffy hippies in Copenhagen (?!). Warren Ellis and Stuart Immonen perform their usual hilarious & gripping brain-stem mating here, so you won't be disappointed.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ma'Belle

    I read the first two volumes of Ultimate Fantastic Four as one combined hardcover volume (and as part of my current Warren Ellis binge). I gotta say, Bendis, Kubert, and Ellis all did a great job writing an origin story about a team I'd never previously cared for but am now fascinated by. I hope the series continues to be as enjoyable. I read the first two volumes of Ultimate Fantastic Four as one combined hardcover volume (and as part of my current Warren Ellis binge). I gotta say, Bendis, Kubert, and Ellis all did a great job writing an origin story about a team I'd never previously cared for but am now fascinated by. I hope the series continues to be as enjoyable.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    We spend some downtime with the (still unnamed) FF in this volume as they learn about their powers and become closer as a group. The science revelations – like how Reed has basically no internal organs, or that Ben still goes to the bathroom – are pretty great. I think Ellis has a good handle on the characters, too, especially Reed and Sue. I’m not sure about this version of Doctor Doom, though. He seems a little too… unbalanced? His backstory isn’t as compelling as that of his 616 counterpart, We spend some downtime with the (still unnamed) FF in this volume as they learn about their powers and become closer as a group. The science revelations – like how Reed has basically no internal organs, or that Ben still goes to the bathroom – are pretty great. I think Ellis has a good handle on the characters, too, especially Reed and Sue. I’m not sure about this version of Doctor Doom, though. He seems a little too… unbalanced? His backstory isn’t as compelling as that of his 616 counterpart, either. I give Ellis credit for trying something new, but it doesn’t quite work for me. This is still a good series of superhero science-fiction adventure. I’m just not in love with it yet.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kenneth Clark

    Classic We finally find out what happened to Van Damme after the events in book 1. I loved this reimagining of Doom. This version of him felt more Doom-like than any other version that I have ever seen.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    Al in all a decent series, I like Millar’s Ultimate alternate take on FF a lot better than the traditional FF but this volume is not the strongest in the series. Entirely readable but not all that strong stuff.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Noah

    For such a memorable beginning, I had high hopes, but the writing and illustration was below expectations. This is probably a serviceable story for those familiar with the franchise, but I wasn't particularly drawn into it. For such a memorable beginning, I had high hopes, but the writing and illustration was below expectations. This is probably a serviceable story for those familiar with the franchise, but I wasn't particularly drawn into it.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Marloges

    Pretty good arc focusing mainly about Doom. The thing that disappointed me about this was Doom himself, he seems like a whiny, generic cartoon villian and does not feel menacing at all... so far. Other than that it was a fun read, the characterization of the FF is pretty good.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    I did not love how Dr. Doom was drawn in this series.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Frans Kempe

    Doom makes his play and attacks the Fantastic Four

  18. 5 out of 5

    Paxton Holley

    More awesomeness. I will definitely continue reading Ultimate Fantastic Four. I just love these characters.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Very cool again, introduction to Fantasti-car. Sue turning into the real tough leader. Reed falling back to just genius. Ben comes up with Clobbering time

  20. 4 out of 5

    Madeline

    Contains the most badass version of Reed Richards I’ve ever seen. 10/10.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Hetherington

    Disappointing. :-(

  22. 4 out of 5

    Vincent Russell

    really enjoyed this one. next please!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ekenedilichukwu Ikegwuani

    they settled into a nice inter character dynamic with this one, but the story is lackluster. doom is more of a wimpy child than an intimidating villain

  24. 5 out of 5

    David Muñoz

    This Volume Holds issues of 7-12 and the writing is taken over by Warren Ellis and art is taking over by Stuart Immonmen. And i gotta I say I’m not crazy about those replacements. I don’t think these two are as fun as the Mark Miller, Brain M. Bendis, and Adam Kubert team . In no way was this arc bad but it did feel like it was a lot of set up for a kinda rushed end. The fun and action from the first volume wasn’t there and I wasn’t the biggest fan of Stuart’s art. It just doesn’t feel “Fantasti This Volume Holds issues of 7-12 and the writing is taken over by Warren Ellis and art is taking over by Stuart Immonmen. And i gotta I say I’m not crazy about those replacements. I don’t think these two are as fun as the Mark Miller, Brain M. Bendis, and Adam Kubert team . In no way was this arc bad but it did feel like it was a lot of set up for a kinda rushed end. The fun and action from the first volume wasn’t there and I wasn’t the biggest fan of Stuart’s art. It just doesn’t feel “Fantastic Four” to me. (That makes no sense). I think the twist they did with Doom was interesting but it didn’t wow me as much as I thought it would. I’m honestly more interested in Mole man as a villain at this point. Warrens writing with dialogue is really natural and I like that but it’s the plot and the way the story flowed, that I really couldn’t get into. Not terrible but not as great as the last volume.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christian Kotsur

    Of the few Fantastic Four volumes I have read over the years this was my favorite representation of Dr. Doom, for once the danger seems somewhat immediate for our heroes. Enjoyable all around. 4/5

  26. 4 out of 5

    Mark Pettit

    This finally gave me a good idea of the chemistry that should exist in a good Fantastic Four title. I've read some of the early stuff, I've seen the cartoons and pieces of the movie, and I really never understood the team at all. Why is Ben so angry all the time? What's the deal with Sue and Reed? I know this story is set in Earth-1610, so it has its own continuity. But if this is any indication of how the team should interact with each other, I'm really impressed. This is an excellent story, and t This finally gave me a good idea of the chemistry that should exist in a good Fantastic Four title. I've read some of the early stuff, I've seen the cartoons and pieces of the movie, and I really never understood the team at all. Why is Ben so angry all the time? What's the deal with Sue and Reed? I know this story is set in Earth-1610, so it has its own continuity. But if this is any indication of how the team should interact with each other, I'm really impressed. This is an excellent story, and the team interaction is really charming. This is one of the best Earth-1610 (Ultimate Marvel) stories I've read yet.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Manuel Alejandro

    I think Warren Ellis doesn’t receive half of the praise that he deserves as a comic book writer. Don’t get me wrong, his work IS a pretty big deal, but I think based in how good his work has generally been and how much understanding he has of the medium you would think that he would be more recognized by the comic book fans. Warren Ellis worked in the Ultimate Universe for a couple of years. I believe it was probably because he felt that there he could take advantage to write his classical weird I think Warren Ellis doesn’t receive half of the praise that he deserves as a comic book writer. Don’t get me wrong, his work IS a pretty big deal, but I think based in how good his work has generally been and how much understanding he has of the medium you would think that he would be more recognized by the comic book fans. Warren Ellis worked in the Ultimate Universe for a couple of years. I believe it was probably because he felt that there he could take advantage to write his classical weird science fiction stories with more freedom and less concern about continuity. You can see how a concept like the Fantastic Four could easily interest Ellis. He even played with the concept before in his wonderful Planetary. What happens in this volume is the introduction of Doctor Doom as a super villain in the Ultimate Universe. He is show in a different light than his traditional version. In this universe he is a mad scientist with daddy issues that wants to destroy Reed Richards and his friends. He is also related to one very particular man in history that works as a funny and disturbing discovery for the audience at the same time. Warren Ellis is very good telling simple stories that aren’t as dense and strange as some of his more personal work, but this stories usually only last 1-3 issues. In this case Ellis takes six issues to tell the whole story which can make it feel a little bit stretched in a couple of parts. Fortunately the art is by the chameleonic Stuart Immonen. So, even if it is stretched, the story still feels dynamic and fun. In conclusion: good art, cool ideas, Fantastic Four, Warren Ellis. Read it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    This is the second installment of what is a reboot of the story of the Fantastic Four. In this case the accident that gave them their powers was not exposure to cosmic rays, but a failed experiment to transport solid matter to a parallel universe. In this story, the U. S. government is paranoid about their powers and wants them to stay in the Baxter Building. The Fantastic Four is essentially under house arrest with a significant military guard. The U. S. military also is far more aggressive i This is the second installment of what is a reboot of the story of the Fantastic Four. In this case the accident that gave them their powers was not exposure to cosmic rays, but a failed experiment to transport solid matter to a parallel universe. In this story, the U. S. government is paranoid about their powers and wants them to stay in the Baxter Building. The Fantastic Four is essentially under house arrest with a significant military guard. The U. S. military also is far more aggressive in conducting operations in the U. S. and elsewhere. When it is clear that Victor Van Damme is still alive and plotting, the Fantastic Four depart the Baxter Building in an attempt to subdue him. They are in a race with U. S. forces, a team of Special Forces are also on the way to arrest Van Damme. The fact that he is in the sovereign territory of another nation is not considered a significant impediment. Still trying to determine the nature and limits of their powers, the members of the Fantastic Four are also building the camaraderie that will turn them into a powerful and coherent team. If you are wedded to the original story, then you may find the new approach a bit disconcerting. Yet, it is an engaging story, even though there are many layers to the tread of Dr. Doom against the Fantastic Four. The paranoid nature of the U. S. government is also a more accurate portrayal of what would happen if such powers were to be acquired.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Travis

    Fun, but uneven read. This story reminds us that stripped down to basics the FF is a pretty cool concept, Ellis seems to have toned down his 'I'm a cranky old bastard' enough to write good, straight forward versions of the four, while thinking about how their bodies have changed and what that means. Wish Warren had toned down his attempts at writing 'cool youth slang' s well as making fun of parts of the FF mythos. That bit of meta 'nudge, nudge, you get it, Fantasti-car is pretty goofy' is distr Fun, but uneven read. This story reminds us that stripped down to basics the FF is a pretty cool concept, Ellis seems to have toned down his 'I'm a cranky old bastard' enough to write good, straight forward versions of the four, while thinking about how their bodies have changed and what that means. Wish Warren had toned down his attempts at writing 'cool youth slang' s well as making fun of parts of the FF mythos. That bit of meta 'nudge, nudge, you get it, Fantasti-car is pretty goofy' is distracting and not that fun. and I wouldn't be making fun of 'It's Clobbering time' in the same story that you give us 'Van Damme, heir to Dracula'. The fight scenes were decent and Warren makes good use of the FF's powers. Like all Ultimate titles, the story moves at a snails pace, and the reason the fight scenes are so impressive is that we sat through three issues of everybody sitting around talking, but this is still one of the best of the Ultimate-verse titles.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Raymond

    I'll say this much - few comics have left me quite as conflicted as Ultimate Fantastic Four so far. I keep going back and forth between really enjoying it and rolling my eyes a lot, and a lot of it likely has to do with my significant enjoyment of the Future Foundation books. Hickman is good at this in a way that Bendis and Ellis are...different. Not worse, but different. In this, we're continuing origin stuff a bit. That's the key point, and it's a lot of origin mixed with Doctor Doom, and the I'll say this much - few comics have left me quite as conflicted as Ultimate Fantastic Four so far. I keep going back and forth between really enjoying it and rolling my eyes a lot, and a lot of it likely has to do with my significant enjoyment of the Future Foundation books. Hickman is good at this in a way that Bendis and Ellis are...different. Not worse, but different. In this, we're continuing origin stuff a bit. That's the key point, and it's a lot of origin mixed with Doctor Doom, and the reason I struggle is the Ultimate Universe's need to make the characters teenagers - I'm having a really tough time buying into the teen aspects of the group at this point. We'll see, in any regard. I'm not giving up yet, though.

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