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Nothing to Lose But Your Life: An 18-Hour Journey With Murad

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The story of a Palestinian woman's harrowing trek as she shadows illegal workers crossing into the town of Petah Tikva in Israel, this book encapsulates eighteen hours that contain countless moments of mortal danger. The story of a Palestinian woman's harrowing trek as she shadows illegal workers crossing into the town of Petah Tikva in Israel, this book encapsulates eighteen hours that contain countless moments of mortal danger.


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The story of a Palestinian woman's harrowing trek as she shadows illegal workers crossing into the town of Petah Tikva in Israel, this book encapsulates eighteen hours that contain countless moments of mortal danger. The story of a Palestinian woman's harrowing trek as she shadows illegal workers crossing into the town of Petah Tikva in Israel, this book encapsulates eighteen hours that contain countless moments of mortal danger.

30 review for Nothing to Lose But Your Life: An 18-Hour Journey With Murad

  1. 5 out of 5

    Marieke

    This was an interesting piece of journalism, but i wanted more. I think i was expecting something along the lines of Palestinian Walks: Forays into a Vanishing Landscape in terms of showing the reader how deeply and thoroughly Israel is manipulating the landscape and thereby controlling the Palestinian population. We do get clues like, "I spent my whole life working for them, and now look at me; like a thief, I steal my livelihood in the dark, basruq 'ishti sirqa. It used to take us half an hour This was an interesting piece of journalism, but i wanted more. I think i was expecting something along the lines of Palestinian Walks: Forays into a Vanishing Landscape in terms of showing the reader how deeply and thoroughly Israel is manipulating the landscape and thereby controlling the Palestinian population. We do get clues like, "I spent my whole life working for them, and now look at me; like a thief, I steal my livelihood in the dark, basruq 'ishti sirqa. It used to take us half an hour to drive there, and now, as you see, it takes us a whole night in the hills...that's if we don't get arrested or beaten up." and 'Did you say from the West Bank to Israel?' I asked out loud. 'Muneer, do you mean to tell me that we've been on "our side" all this time? And what have we been doing for the last ten fucking hours?' What were they doing? They were hiding and dodging Israeli security, waiting for the opportunity to slip across the border...which led the author to puzzle it out: So we're not harassed when in Israel, but we're harassed when in Palestine; we're safe in Israel, but not safe in Palestine. Soon I was talking to myself, and for the first time ever I knew why mad people talk to themselves. I was excited to read book this because the author would be telling the Palestinian story through the lens of illegal migrant workers*, which to me is an unfamiliar vantage. Despite some very keen observations from the author, I didn't feel frustrated enough reading about their plight. I really wanted the author to delve deeper into the issues and create a more substantive book rather than just a straightforward yet sometimes poetic diary of her trek across the border with a group of workers. She offered her own reflections, memories, daydreams/nightmares, which were interesting and somewhat insightful...but i wish she had included more objective journalism to better illustrate what these men are up against. That said, the author did an excellent job of drawing out the strange confusions and ironies of life in contemporary Occupied Palestinian Territories and Israel "proper." For instance, Arab versus Israeli employers; working in settlements versus working inside Israel; and this observation, perhaps the most poignant of all: Coming here for one-third of his life, and all his adult life, which had started at the age of thirteen, as there was hardly a childhood for young Palestinians like Murad and his friends. Murad must've felt a strong sense of entitlement to this land. He gave this place his hard work, his cheap labour, his energy and his strong muscles. and from the Israeli perspective: The majority of Israelis hated the settlers to the point where they insisted that the settlers must remain with us, on the West Bank. However, the author pointed out earlier in the book that one reason Palestinians have, do, and will help with settlement construction is that they fully expect to move into and inhabit these beautiful settlements someday when the Israeli settlers are forced back across the border into Israel "proper."** *Why are they illegal? In the year 2000, when the second uprising erupted, Sharon cancelled all work permits, and so overnight over 150,000 workers lost their jobs in Israel after having worked there for more than thirty-three years (from 1967-2000). And with a complete economic dependency on Israel, the disjointed and disconnected Occupied Territories hadn't much to offer. This economic dependency is one aspect of life in Palestine i wish the author had explored more deeply. **But that's only if a two-state solution ever comes to fruition, which I am highly doubtful ever will.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nahla Hanno

    The late Edward Said has repeatedly asked us to "reaffirm the power of culture over the culture of power,” and that’s exactly what Saud Amiry has successfully done in her new book Nothing to Lose but Your Life. Applying the same successful formula she used in her first book Sharon and my Mother in-Law, Amiry’s ability to be both funny & balanced even when documenting the inhumane & miserable conditions under which the Palestinians live in the occupied territories is truly powerful. It is also muc The late Edward Said has repeatedly asked us to "reaffirm the power of culture over the culture of power,” and that’s exactly what Saud Amiry has successfully done in her new book Nothing to Lose but Your Life. Applying the same successful formula she used in her first book Sharon and my Mother in-Law, Amiry’s ability to be both funny & balanced even when documenting the inhumane & miserable conditions under which the Palestinians live in the occupied territories is truly powerful. It is also much more effective in amassing the support of people around the world than tens of speeches by politicians. Amiry’s book is a chronicle of the 18 hours journey, mostly spent running or hiding, she experienced first-hand when she accompanied a group of Palestinian men from a small village in the West Bank trying to sneak into Israel to reach the worker’s market, where Israeli employers pick them up to do various manual labor jobs. I usually complain to everyone I know, and sometimes to people I don’t know, that I have to wake up at 6:00 a.m. every weekday morning to be at my office at 7:00 a.m. I was ashamed of my petty grumble when I realized that Palestinian laborers, who were denied work permits after the second Intifada, leave their homes at 2:30 a.m., to start a hellish journey that takes them across hills and valleys, through tunnels and over fences, all this while trying to avoid and evade Israeli security forces waiting for them in the darkness of the night. Exhausted by the dangerous hide-and-seek game between the Palestinian potential laborers and the Israeli security forces, and getting genuinely scared for their safety when the sun cruelly rises before the group is able to reach its destination, I wondered why they just don't turn back and try again the next day. Amiry doesn't leave me wondering for long. A member in her group tells us that the men would chose being arrested or injured over the embarrassment of going home to their families empty handed. When Amiry and her three companions, Murad, Saed and Mohamed, manage to avoid being arrested, injured, or discouraged by fatigue and the slim chance of finding work that late in the day, and finally go past an opening in the infamous Security Wall in the afternoon, Amiry was shocked, and so was I, when she was reminded that the military check points, the separate roads, the hiding, the chase, the arrests, and the gunshots were all happening in the West Bank, that is, in undisputed Palestinian territories. It is ironic to note that once in Israel; they had relatively much more freedom to move from one place to another, and they even managed to ride the Israeli public transportation. I strongly recommend this book. The English version was published in 2010 by Bloomsbury Qatar Foundation Publishing. The book is also available in Arabic under the title مراد مراد

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Abdo

    I read Amiry's "Sharon and My Mother-in-law" first and loved the mix of explaining the Palestinian situation and humor and resilience. The first part of this one didn't hook me like that book, but the second part more than made up for it. In chapter 10, she realizes they have been in the West Bank all this time (they are about to cross at The Wall) and the dangers, fear of arrest, running, bullets, hiding, etc happened on what is supposedly their own turf. Even for Amiry, who knows about things l I read Amiry's "Sharon and My Mother-in-law" first and loved the mix of explaining the Palestinian situation and humor and resilience. The first part of this one didn't hook me like that book, but the second part more than made up for it. In chapter 10, she realizes they have been in the West Bank all this time (they are about to cross at The Wall) and the dangers, fear of arrest, running, bullets, hiding, etc happened on what is supposedly their own turf. Even for Amiry, who knows about things like this, the shock is palpable. Chapters 11 and 12 struck me as out of place at first, but after some thought, they capture the situation perfectly. Chapter 11 is a fable or a few fables and 12 is about The Wall and a particular graffiti artist. I didn't realize at first that most of these images are actual Banksy "paintings" on the Wall; I only had seen a few in pictures. This chapter, like the art, is profound. In chapter 14, this quote was great: "I don't know what it is about Palestinians; they all believe they can pass for an Israeli, regardless of how typically Arab they look, the second they put on sunglasses." It comes amid the various adjustments the workers are making to their appearance as they prepare to "blend" in with Jewish Israelis. I was aware of the plight of Palestinian workers, but not so much with this aspect. Very interesting. Last sentence of chapter 14: "Only then did I realise that for me, and many others, Israel was virtual. For Murad, Israel was 'home.' Israel was a reality; a harsh reality." At a cafe (deciding whether or not to continue), she defines the ultimate love-hate relationship, being out of ones' skin, out of place and history as being in her homeland Palestine. Nearing the decision to quit the search for work for the day and distance themselves from the actual workers who they have slowed down some, they rest in a park and she tells a bit about what an Israeli park actually is- a peaceful green space that, by contrast, was taken by force from Arab villagers. For instance, most Palestinians are referring to Petah Tikvah as Mlabbis, it's original name. This several pages long daydream about Mlabbis/ Petah Tikvah is brilliant. I wonder if she knew or researched the history, heard bits from Murad, or simply recounted the familiar 1948 Palestine or Nakba memory shared by many people and villages and retold by more. In chapter 16, she talks about missing the Tel-Aviv (Lod) airport and the firman Sharon issued that no Palestinian from the West Bank or Gaza could use this airport. Also on this portion of the bus ride she remembers various Palestinian villages while looking for the rubble. At the end, she takes off her worker's clothes and steps back into her life and reflects on the situation- real risks and dangers- that they face every day just to get a day's work. And the author's note! It is an article she reads the day she gets home about a worker getting shot doing what she just did.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer (JC-S)

    ‘A land with no people for a people with no land.’ Suad Amiry is an architect and university professor who lives in Ramallah. The presence of the wall between Israel and the Palestinians has had a significant impact on many Palestinians, and it is this impact which has motivated Ms Amiry to write this book. Many Palestinians lost their jobs as a consequence of the wall, and one of those Palestinians is Murad, a Palestinian labourer aged 21 who had been working in Israel since he was 13 years old. ‘A land with no people for a people with no land.’ Suad Amiry is an architect and university professor who lives in Ramallah. The presence of the wall between Israel and the Palestinians has had a significant impact on many Palestinians, and it is this impact which has motivated Ms Amiry to write this book. Many Palestinians lost their jobs as a consequence of the wall, and one of those Palestinians is Murad, a Palestinian labourer aged 21 who had been working in Israel since he was 13 years old. Ms Amiry decided to accompany Murad on a trip to Israel to search for work after hearing some of his stories about the difficulties involved. This is Ms Amiry’s account of the 18 hour period she spent with Murad – from the time she patted her dog on the head and left her home in Ramallah, until she returned. She took a tape recorder with her, but much of the book is based on her recollections of the journey: of confrontation, of checkpoints, of Murad, and of the travel involved. The journey was not straightforward: the travel involves others, each with his (they are all men, except for Suad Amiry) own experiences of life and the constant search for work. Some stories are horrifying, others are amusing, and each involves memories of a different past. There’s a lot of waiting involved: waiting for Israeli soldiers to move on so that the travellers can cross into Israel. Of the 24 workers from the original group Ms Amiry joined, only 4 made it into Israel, the other 20 were arrested. As were many others of the larger group of 500 to 600 people who were attempting to cross at the same location. Once they reached the other side, they try to blend in, by getting on a bus with the Israelis: ‘So much for looking Israeli, I thought to myself. It takes more than a pair of sunglasses to escape one’s looks, one’s class and one’s nationality. But I also thanked God that some 10-15% of Palestinians stayed behind in 1948 so as to give us a cover sixty years later.’ The landscape has changed – many towns have been destroyed and turned into parks by the Israeli authorities. Suad Amiry does not always know exactly where she is: ‘I wondered if I was lying in the middle of the Mlabbis graveyard.’ And later reflects: ‘Wasn’t it amazing that now we needed simple things such as a road sign to assure us that we truly existed in this land?’ It’s a disturbing story, but well worth reading for the perspective it offers. Jennifer Cameron-Smith

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jean Borg

    I have read this book with the aloof feeling that I actually saw the writer Suad Amiry in person. It was at this year’s Mediterranean Festival organised in what is called the Garden of Rest, bang at the centre of the Mediterranean, in the small island of Malta. On the last day, with no cloud impeding the stars in the sky, Amiry in a loquacious and funny manner had stole the show. She made people listen, she made people wince and she made people laugh. I knew I had to get her book. And now finally I have read this book with the aloof feeling that I actually saw the writer Suad Amiry in person. It was at this year’s Mediterranean Festival organised in what is called the Garden of Rest, bang at the centre of the Mediterranean, in the small island of Malta. On the last day, with no cloud impeding the stars in the sky, Amiry in a loquacious and funny manner had stole the show. She made people listen, she made people wince and she made people laugh. I knew I had to get her book. And now finally, it was time to read the book. When it comes to the written word, Amiry is less extravagant. She has managed to put in eighteen hours in just 162 pages. But she equally managed to transform me in her world, make me wince and equally laugh. She narrates and lives a tragedy that takes place in the form of a journey. A journey not for the sake of itself, but a journey for the sake of survival. A journey for the sake of the dignity of a job. For the sake of feeling useful. I was feeling of living in a small world, where nothing is far away. The internet medium in particular made me feel like that. I see something at the other end of the world, and with a click it reaches my doorstep in a week or so. I live on an island, but to get to another country, it sometimes feel like getting on a bus, with no passport needed, and in three hours and sometimes literally with a few euros you are miles and miles away from home. But then, in a particular part of the world, a wall makes crossing from point A to point B a life threatening situation. You might make it past the wall, of course nothing is impossible. But then getting on a bus, it’s harder than what for me is getting on a plane. And Amiry reminded me that for some, rather than it’s such a small world, everyday life is a case of so near yet so far.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Graham

    This book is an important read to get a sense of what it is like to live in the Occupied Territories, the struggle to live a life of dignity and to make enough money to live off of. About a group of workers seeking to enter Israel in order to find employment (insecure employment, dangerous, where they could be worked for a month then beaten, arrested, deported, without pay, or killed) as permitless workers. The majority of the book, taking place over one day, occurs in the occupied territories - This book is an important read to get a sense of what it is like to live in the Occupied Territories, the struggle to live a life of dignity and to make enough money to live off of. About a group of workers seeking to enter Israel in order to find employment (insecure employment, dangerous, where they could be worked for a month then beaten, arrested, deported, without pay, or killed) as permitless workers. The majority of the book, taking place over one day, occurs in the occupied territories - the chases by the military, the need to sneak about on your own land, the life-threatening danger... The author of the book is a professor, a woman named Suad Amiry. She disguises herself as a man in order to make this journey, and despite this I feel like the gender dynamics aren't in fact overtly explored. Suad is making a point to look at the lived experience of the permitless worker, and aside from the skepticism and questioning of her travel partners or the family that hosts her briefly in the beginning, gender isn't so much directly explored. Though now that I think on it, looking at the roles women possess through the moments they emerged in this story (mother, food preparers and bearers, lovers or objects of lust; in Israel, business owners or workers, property owners), maybe more was said indirectly than not. Overall, read this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Frank Ashe

    Brings out the injustice and extreme pettiness of the Israeli occupation.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mira

    Insightful.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Reeman

    This was painful. Once again, a book about Palestine tears my heart and makes me feel helpless, and mad, and ignorant. I have a lot of respect for Suad Amiry, as an architect, as a writer, and as an influential woman in the Palestinian cultural scene. She tackled an ignored issue that not much has been written about. I read the book in English, the original language of the book, but it felt translated and a bit unnatural. A good editor would've added a lot to the value of the book. I'm definitely This was painful. Once again, a book about Palestine tears my heart and makes me feel helpless, and mad, and ignorant. I have a lot of respect for Suad Amiry, as an architect, as a writer, and as an influential woman in the Palestinian cultural scene. She tackled an ignored issue that not much has been written about. I read the book in English, the original language of the book, but it felt translated and a bit unnatural. A good editor would've added a lot to the value of the book. I'm definitely going to read books by Suad again, but probably in Arabic.

  10. 4 out of 5

    رولا البلبيسي Rula Bilbeisi

    This is not just an 18 hour journey….this is the carnival of existence…the parade of survival…the dance for life…the masquerade of death…and in the end it all added up to the continuation of hope. As Suad tries to collect material for her new book, she follows Murad one night to find out how he can earn a living. Murad is one of the 150000 Palestinian workers whose work permits were canceled. Murad is one of the 150000 Palestinians who are feeding a million others. Murad whose only dream was to p This is not just an 18 hour journey….this is the carnival of existence…the parade of survival…the dance for life…the masquerade of death…and in the end it all added up to the continuation of hope. As Suad tries to collect material for her new book, she follows Murad one night to find out how he can earn a living. Murad is one of the 150000 Palestinian workers whose work permits were canceled. Murad is one of the 150000 Palestinians who are feeding a million others. Murad whose only dream was to play guitar, a simple dream that was impossible to fulfill in his harsh reality. Murad, one of many who can't afford the luxury of giving up. Through checkpoints, barriers and walls, they were running away from soldiers, hiding in bushes, trying so hard to steal their livelihood, not knowing that finding a day’s work could only cost them their life. This is not only a heart breaking true story, this is a portray of the unfair and unbearable reality a nation is going through just to attain its right to exist. Yet in between all that drama and heartaches, the writer mixes humor with tragedy so as a smile slips away with every tear. I quote: “this is a trip that completely changed my life, my attitude, and surfaced my anger about an “unfair” world that Palestinians are fated to face…all alone…and for that I apologize”. Summerizing her feelings while seeing the Palestine she is not allowed to visit, the writer says: "There is no other place on this planet where I feel so out of place, so out of space, so out of time, so out of history, so out of meaning, so out of logic, so out of my skin, and so outraged as when I am in my historic homeland Palestine." One book worth reading, I just hoped there was more of Murad's life while working in Isreal...not our virtual Isreal, but his reality.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Author and architect Suad Amiry joins a group of impoverished Palestinians in an attempt to cross into Israel in search of work. Books wherein an author sets out to live the lives and tell the stories of people in classes lower than their own are difficult, simply for the reason that it's very easy for the author in question to give up, or turn back and suffer no repercussions. And because of that, they don't always convey the weight they intend. In this instance, Amiry's writing is at most times Author and architect Suad Amiry joins a group of impoverished Palestinians in an attempt to cross into Israel in search of work. Books wherein an author sets out to live the lives and tell the stories of people in classes lower than their own are difficult, simply for the reason that it's very easy for the author in question to give up, or turn back and suffer no repercussions. And because of that, they don't always convey the weight they intend. In this instance, Amiry's writing is at most times lighthearted and reads as though you are listening to a story told by a friend, and because of this, I had a hard time grasping the sense of danger she felt. I realise that she was fortunate during her trip, in that she didn't have a great deal of difficulty during her attempt to get to her destination. Her travel companions on the other hand have stories of their own, and had less luck during their journey, but you don't get to hear too much about their stories. I suppose I would have liked to hear from the other travelers in the aftermath. If she had checked in to see how her they fared after she returned to her life, there is no mention of it in this book. There was however a lot that moved me, I felt for the people but also was struck by how matter of fact they were about their lives and the situations they faced on a day to day basis. But I feel I keep coming back to the same conclusion, and that is I would have liked a little less of the author's own story and a little more of the people around her.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Pati Caceres

    I'm sorry to say this, but this book has disappointed me big time. The beginning is good and promising, but the topic is just too big for this author. The narrator's tone is too lighthearted, she talks more about herself than about the men she's supposed to talk about. She keeps talking about HER fear during the trip, about how out of place SHE feels, about how unfit SHE is, both physically and mentally... She talks so much about herself, she hardly portrays the circumstances of her fellow trave I'm sorry to say this, but this book has disappointed me big time. The beginning is good and promising, but the topic is just too big for this author. The narrator's tone is too lighthearted, she talks more about herself than about the men she's supposed to talk about. She keeps talking about HER fear during the trip, about how out of place SHE feels, about how unfit SHE is, both physically and mentally... She talks so much about herself, she hardly portrays the circumstances of her fellow travelers. Even less their feelings, their fears, their struggle day by day for survival, their accommodation to the overall injustice. She could be talking about any sport, because she really forgets what the story is about. Maybe the title of the book is wrong? Only at the end of the book does she try to talk about the injustice and tries to transmit it to the reader. Problem is, when you use a paranoid metaphor about animals, and abuse alliteration, the message gets lost. And your reader just got bored. Of course I could think that maybe the lighthearted tone was used on purpose, that the narrator talking about whether her companions are handsome or not is an attempt to move readers showing us how "naturally" they take the injustice in Palestine. But then, the writing style is too poor, the figures of speech are wrongly used, and the internal dialogue of the narrator gets too distracted at parts. And it's a real pity, because this book has very good parts, I'll give the author that. I think a good editor could have helped her a lot.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Amira

    Another great book by Suad Amiry. The book is Amiry's account of her 18-hour-journey with Murad and his brother Mohammad, along with over two dozens of Palestinian workers, who risk their own lives everyday by sneaking into the Israeli town of Petah Tikva to seek work. Disguising herself as a male worker, Amiry joined the Palestinian workers in their extremely dangerous and horrifying trip. Amiry's account of this trip is interspersed with a myriad of stories told by her companions in the journe Another great book by Suad Amiry. The book is Amiry's account of her 18-hour-journey with Murad and his brother Mohammad, along with over two dozens of Palestinian workers, who risk their own lives everyday by sneaking into the Israeli town of Petah Tikva to seek work. Disguising herself as a male worker, Amiry joined the Palestinian workers in their extremely dangerous and horrifying trip. Amiry's account of this trip is interspersed with a myriad of stories told by her companions in the journey as well as her own thoughts and reflections on the issue of Israeli occupation of her country. Though the book highlights the harsh circumstances and the awful experiences that many Palestinians go through, it includes a lot of interesting anecdotes and comments told by Amiry and the other Palestinian characters in her book. it is an excellent book that sheds light on the difficult lives of thousands of Palestinian workers under the israeli occupation.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Agnes Goyvaerts

    I found it a good read, as I already met the author and heard her talk on the whole subject, I was familiar with what the Palestinians who are looking for work in their former Palestine, their former villages who are now destroyed, have to go through. The author writes in a poetic sort of way, bringing memories back from before the settlements - of the villages as they were, the people living happily among their Olive and other fruit trees. She shows the difficulty of the workers to get a day's I found it a good read, as I already met the author and heard her talk on the whole subject, I was familiar with what the Palestinians who are looking for work in their former Palestine, their former villages who are now destroyed, have to go through. The author writes in a poetic sort of way, bringing memories back from before the settlements - of the villages as they were, the people living happily among their Olive and other fruit trees. She shows the difficulty of the workers to get a day's work, and the hopelessness of the whole situation in a land that was theirs but has been taken away by the Israelis. I especially liked her ending of the book, which is so profound and which sums it all up for us who have not experienced this sort of terror or difficulty, that to this day is still going on for most Palestinians.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Yara

    well, although i read it translated (to english), i found the language absolutely beautiful If for the book content itself and the story i'd give 5 stars, but guess i have given 4 because of the "journalistic" writing style. moving to content: very engaging and eye opener, it talkes about something that i may rarely encounter any info abt in daily life, the everyday misery & struggle of a 'contemporary' neighbouring population to get their livelihood.... things totally beyound imagination I also fou well, although i read it translated (to english), i found the language absolutely beautiful If for the book content itself and the story i'd give 5 stars, but guess i have given 4 because of the "journalistic" writing style. moving to content: very engaging and eye opener, it talkes about something that i may rarely encounter any info abt in daily life, the everyday misery & struggle of a 'contemporary' neighbouring population to get their livelihood.... things totally beyound imagination I also found myself every now and then checking google web and images to try to live the experience with the writer who got me really enagaged. i just loved the 2 days of my life that i spent with the book.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Lana

    this is a very powerful account of a journey through the Palestinian occupied territories by a group of Palestinians looking for a day's work. it is a harrowing account full of all the danger these people face in their day to day living, but it also has some lighthearted humour which these people tend to express even though their lives are so difficult. Suad Amiry is one hell of a woman and a good writer, would recommend to all who are interested in life in the occupied territories of Palestine. this is a very powerful account of a journey through the Palestinian occupied territories by a group of Palestinians looking for a day's work. it is a harrowing account full of all the danger these people face in their day to day living, but it also has some lighthearted humour which these people tend to express even though their lives are so difficult. Suad Amiry is one hell of a woman and a good writer, would recommend to all who are interested in life in the occupied territories of Palestine.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Masoud

    When one's daily journey to work becomes extremely unusual that he doesn't know whether he'll be arrested, beaten up, killed, or hopefully being able to cross and make it to the other side for work. Sadly, workers risk their lives every day in order to make a living; making workers leave their fears behind. Hence, at to this point, one would say: Yes, #Nothing_to_lost_but_your_life. I always like these kind of books since they make us realize how privileged our life is compared to others who suffe When one's daily journey to work becomes extremely unusual that he doesn't know whether he'll be arrested, beaten up, killed, or hopefully being able to cross and make it to the other side for work. Sadly, workers risk their lives every day in order to make a living; making workers leave their fears behind. Hence, at to this point, one would say: Yes, #Nothing_to_lost_but_your_life. I always like these kind of books since they make us realize how privileged our life is compared to others who suffering, yet still fighting.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Yomna

    A simple read. My first time to read a story about Palestine. I learned interesting stuff. And I hated Israel even more. It talks about how Palestinians cannot even get a decent job because of how Israelis make it impossible for them to get a work permit. They then have to sneak into Israel, risking their lives everyday, and the possibility that they won't even find someone to hire them for the day. Even though it's supposed to be a sad story, the author is hilarious in the way she tells it. A simple read. My first time to read a story about Palestine. I learned interesting stuff. And I hated Israel even more. It talks about how Palestinians cannot even get a decent job because of how Israelis make it impossible for them to get a work permit. They then have to sneak into Israel, risking their lives everyday, and the possibility that they won't even find someone to hire them for the day. Even though it's supposed to be a sad story, the author is hilarious in the way she tells it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mostafa Mostafa

    I loved the way she writes... A search for an identity and a day in palestine..u get to see how they live..how to live peacefully with their jewish partners is an option for some... The comparison between pre-wall and post-wall...and the huge emotions poured into this book. The chapter abt the wall was simply amazing! This book is highly recommended for those who wanna live the experience...for a day!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ayunda

    We bought this book on Ubud, and actually met the author! In the beginning I really enjoyed the book, it was interesting, and just fun to read. The whole story was very exciting, but the end got a little boring, maybe because I didn't really understand about most of them. But overall, this book is great :) We bought this book on Ubud, and actually met the author! In the beginning I really enjoyed the book, it was interesting, and just fun to read. The whole story was very exciting, but the end got a little boring, maybe because I didn't really understand about most of them. But overall, this book is great :)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Maha

    Another nice book by Suad. She describes the challenging journey by a bunch of Palestinian youth traveling to cross the 'green line' to get temp work from Israelis. Why do they do this? and why is it challenging? That is what the book is all about. The story of the 18 hour journey. Another nice book by Suad. She describes the challenging journey by a bunch of Palestinian youth traveling to cross the 'green line' to get temp work from Israelis. Why do they do this? and why is it challenging? That is what the book is all about. The story of the 18 hour journey.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Carmen

    Having undertaken the voyage, Suad Amiry understands more of the problems encountered by the Palestinian workers who cross to Israel to earn something. In her book she writes about what she sees. hears and feels in a very interesting and informative way which makes the book very readable.

  23. 4 out of 5

    wioblivion

    signed by Suad Amiry at Ubud Writers & Readers Festival, October 2010

  24. 5 out of 5

    Huda AbuKhoti

    What a book! I am just gonna say this, whoever you are.. you will never regret reading this no matter what your political standing is.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Neveen H. Qi

    Though I am just at the beginning of it , the writer makes me feel exactly as her feeling in the 6 pages . hope i will enjoy it and i am sure i will :)

  26. 5 out of 5

    Khalil ahmd

    New Adventure to start now with Souad Amiry <3

  27. 4 out of 5

    Mohammad

    A nice but tough journey of the Palestinians searching for a job. How cruel the Israelis were controlling not only their land but also those Palestinian lands as well

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jacqueline Williams

    Enjoyed more than Sharon and my m-i-l. Liked the humour, found tangents hard to follow at times, it was thought provoking.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    Professor Young's Ethnography class. Very good read. Professor Young's Ethnography class. Very good read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Flowers Monther

    Nothing to lose but your life

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