website statistics Best European Fiction 2011 - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Best European Fiction 2011

Availability: Ready to download

The launch of Dalkey’s Best European Fiction series was nothing short of phenomenal, with wide-ranging coverage in international media such as Time magazine, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, Financial Times, and the Guardian; glowing reviews and interviews in print and online magazines such as the Believer, Bookslut, Paste, and the Huffington The launch of Dalkey’s Best European Fiction series was nothing short of phenomenal, with wide-ranging coverage in international media such as Time magazine, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, Financial Times, and the Guardian; glowing reviews and interviews in print and online magazines such as the Believer, Bookslut, Paste, and the Huffington Post; radio interviews with editor Aleksandar Hemon on NPR stations in the US and BBC Radio 3 and 4 in the UK; and a terrific response from booksellers, who made Best European Fiction 2010 an “Indie Next” pick and created table displays and special promotions throughout the US and UK. For 2011, Aleksandar Hemon is back as editor, along with a new preface by Colum McCann, and with a whole new cast of authors and stories, including work from countries not included in Best European Fiction 2010. UK, WALES: Wiliam Owen Roberts, The Professionals UK, ENGLAND: Hilary Mantel, The Hearts Fails without Warning TURKEY: Ersan Üldes, Professional Behavior SWITZERLAND: Verena Stefan, Doe a Deer SPAIN (Catalan): Mercè Ibarz, Nela and the Virgins SPAIN (Castilian): Enrique Vila-Matas, Far From Here SLOVENIA: Drago Jančar, The Prophecy SERBIA: Vladimir Arsenijević, One Minute: Dumbo’s Death RUSSIA: Andrei Gelasimov, The Evil Eye ROMANIA: Lucian Dan Teodorovici, Goose Chase PORTUGAL: Gonçalo Manuel Tavares, Six Tales POLAND: Olga Tokarczuk, The Ugliest Woman in the World NORWAY: Frode Grytten, Hotel by a Railroad NETHERLANDS: Manon Uphoff, Desire MONTENEGRO: Ognjen Spahić, Raymond is No Longer with Us—Carver is Dead MOLDOVA: Iulian Ciocan, Auntie Frosea MACEDONIA: Blaže Minevski, Academician Sisoye’s Inaugural Speech LITHUANIA: Danutė Kalinauskaitė, Just Things LIECHTENSTEIN: Stefan Sprenger, Dust LATVIA: Nora Ikstena, Elza Kuga’s Old-Age Dementia ITALY: Marco Candida, Dream Diary IRELAND (Irish): Éilís Ní Dhuibhne, Trespasses IRELAND (English): Kevin Barry, Doctor Sot ICELAND: Kristín Eiríksdóttir, Holes in People HUNGARY: László Krasznahorkai, The Bill GERMANY: Ingo Schulze, Oranges and Angel GEORGIA: Zurab Lezhava, Sex for Fridge FRANCE: Eric Laurrent, American Diary FINLAND: Anita Konkka, The Clown ESTONIA: Toomas Vint, Beyond the Window a Park is Dimming DENMARK: Peter Adolphsen, Fourteen Small Stories CZECH REPULIC: Michal Ajvaz, The Wire Book CYPRUS: Nora Nadjarian, Exhibition CROATIA: Mimi Simić, My Girlfriend BULGARIA: Alek Popov, Plumbers BOSNIA & HERZEGOVINA: Goran Samardžić, Varneesh BELGIUM: François Emmanuel, Lou Dancing BELARUS: Victor Martinovich, Taboo AUSTRIA: Dieter Sperl, Random Walker ALBANIA: Arian Leka, Brothers of the Blade


Compare

The launch of Dalkey’s Best European Fiction series was nothing short of phenomenal, with wide-ranging coverage in international media such as Time magazine, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, Financial Times, and the Guardian; glowing reviews and interviews in print and online magazines such as the Believer, Bookslut, Paste, and the Huffington The launch of Dalkey’s Best European Fiction series was nothing short of phenomenal, with wide-ranging coverage in international media such as Time magazine, the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Chicago Tribune, Financial Times, and the Guardian; glowing reviews and interviews in print and online magazines such as the Believer, Bookslut, Paste, and the Huffington Post; radio interviews with editor Aleksandar Hemon on NPR stations in the US and BBC Radio 3 and 4 in the UK; and a terrific response from booksellers, who made Best European Fiction 2010 an “Indie Next” pick and created table displays and special promotions throughout the US and UK. For 2011, Aleksandar Hemon is back as editor, along with a new preface by Colum McCann, and with a whole new cast of authors and stories, including work from countries not included in Best European Fiction 2010. UK, WALES: Wiliam Owen Roberts, The Professionals UK, ENGLAND: Hilary Mantel, The Hearts Fails without Warning TURKEY: Ersan Üldes, Professional Behavior SWITZERLAND: Verena Stefan, Doe a Deer SPAIN (Catalan): Mercè Ibarz, Nela and the Virgins SPAIN (Castilian): Enrique Vila-Matas, Far From Here SLOVENIA: Drago Jančar, The Prophecy SERBIA: Vladimir Arsenijević, One Minute: Dumbo’s Death RUSSIA: Andrei Gelasimov, The Evil Eye ROMANIA: Lucian Dan Teodorovici, Goose Chase PORTUGAL: Gonçalo Manuel Tavares, Six Tales POLAND: Olga Tokarczuk, The Ugliest Woman in the World NORWAY: Frode Grytten, Hotel by a Railroad NETHERLANDS: Manon Uphoff, Desire MONTENEGRO: Ognjen Spahić, Raymond is No Longer with Us—Carver is Dead MOLDOVA: Iulian Ciocan, Auntie Frosea MACEDONIA: Blaže Minevski, Academician Sisoye’s Inaugural Speech LITHUANIA: Danutė Kalinauskaitė, Just Things LIECHTENSTEIN: Stefan Sprenger, Dust LATVIA: Nora Ikstena, Elza Kuga’s Old-Age Dementia ITALY: Marco Candida, Dream Diary IRELAND (Irish): Éilís Ní Dhuibhne, Trespasses IRELAND (English): Kevin Barry, Doctor Sot ICELAND: Kristín Eiríksdóttir, Holes in People HUNGARY: László Krasznahorkai, The Bill GERMANY: Ingo Schulze, Oranges and Angel GEORGIA: Zurab Lezhava, Sex for Fridge FRANCE: Eric Laurrent, American Diary FINLAND: Anita Konkka, The Clown ESTONIA: Toomas Vint, Beyond the Window a Park is Dimming DENMARK: Peter Adolphsen, Fourteen Small Stories CZECH REPULIC: Michal Ajvaz, The Wire Book CYPRUS: Nora Nadjarian, Exhibition CROATIA: Mimi Simić, My Girlfriend BULGARIA: Alek Popov, Plumbers BOSNIA & HERZEGOVINA: Goran Samardžić, Varneesh BELGIUM: François Emmanuel, Lou Dancing BELARUS: Victor Martinovich, Taboo AUSTRIA: Dieter Sperl, Random Walker ALBANIA: Arian Leka, Brothers of the Blade

30 review for Best European Fiction 2011

  1. 4 out of 5

    MJ Nicholls

    I will endeavour to rate this fabulous collection in the manner of the Eurovision Song Contest scoring system. The only difference being both the talent levels and absence of musical content. No hang on—there isn’t any musical content in the Eurovision Song Contest either. Har har! Oh, me! You should own this outstanding anthology for its breathtaking scope and impressive quality. Scores out of ten. The ten-pointer indicates a favourite in the collection. Wiliam Owen Roberts, Wales — 7 pts Hilary I will endeavour to rate this fabulous collection in the manner of the Eurovision Song Contest scoring system. The only difference being both the talent levels and absence of musical content. No hang on—there isn’t any musical content in the Eurovision Song Contest either. Har har! Oh, me! You should own this outstanding anthology for its breathtaking scope and impressive quality. Scores out of ten. The ten-pointer indicates a favourite in the collection. Wiliam Owen Roberts, Wales — 7 pts Hilary Mantel, England — 8 pts Ersan Üldes, Turkey — 6 pts Verena Stefan, Switzerland — 6 pts Merce Ibarz, Catalan — 8 pts Enrique Vila-Matas, Spain: Castilian — 7 pts Drago Jančar, Slovenia — 9 pts Vladimir Arsenijević, Serbia — 8 pts Andrei Gelasimov, Russia — 5 pts Lucian Dan Teodorovici, Romania — 9 pts Gonçalo M. Tavares, Portugal — 8 pts Olga Tokarczuk, Poland — 8 pts Frode Grytten, Norway — 9 pts Manon Uphoff, Netherlands — 8 pts Ognjen Spahić, Montenegro — 6 pts Iulian Ciocan, Moldova — 6 pts Blaže Minevski, Macedonia — 7 pts Danutè Kalinauskaitè, Lithuania — 7 pts Stefan Sprenger, Liechtenstein — 6 pts Nora Ikstena, Latvia —7 pts Marco Candida, Italy — 8 pts Éilis Ní Dhuibhne, Ireland: Irish — 9 pts Kevin Barry, Ireland: English — 8 pts Kristín Eiríksdóttir, Iceland — 8 pts László Krasznahorkai, Hungary — 7 pts Ingo Schulze, Germany — 4 pts Zurab Lezhava, Georgia — 9 pts Eric Laurrent, France — 7 pts Anita Konkka, Finland — 8 pts Toomas Vint, Estonia — 8 pts Peter Adolphsen, Denmark — 7 pts Michal Ajvaz, Czech Republic — 9 pts Nora Nadjarian, Cyprus — 6 pts Mima Simić, Croatia — 8 pts Alek Popov, Bulgaria — 9 pts Goran Samardžić, Bosnia & Herzegovina — 10 pts François Emmanuel, Belgium — 7 pts Victor Martinovich, Belarus — 8 pts Dieter Sperl, Austria — 6 pts Arian Leka, Albania — 5 pts

  2. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Wu

    First of all, let me say that with collections like this, I don't start on page 1 (the first story does actually start on page 1) and read all the way through to page 483. I usually keep them by my bed and come back to them time and time again. Secondly, I have to confess that I am very superficial. The first story I read was called Nela and the Virgins by Mercè Ibarz because I thought it might be sensual, particularly when I saw the sentence: "'We won't be virgins long!' Isi and Valentina exclaim First of all, let me say that with collections like this, I don't start on page 1 (the first story does actually start on page 1) and read all the way through to page 483. I usually keep them by my bed and come back to them time and time again. Secondly, I have to confess that I am very superficial. The first story I read was called Nela and the Virgins by Mercè Ibarz because I thought it might be sensual, particularly when I saw the sentence: "'We won't be virgins long!' Isi and Valentina exclaimed at the same time." But it's actually a story about how love evolves silently. "Nothing was said about sex nor about how they spent their nights together." And it's a story about the craft of using that silence as a writer. This was not what I wanted to hear so next I turned to Desire by Manon Uphoff. This was more like it. Another virgin, some rough sex and the art of becoming a woman. "'Woman,' he whispered in her ear. 'Now you're a woman.'" I wasn't sure of the gender of Manon Uphoff. I felt while reading the story that Manon was a man. I wondered if it was important and decided it was important enough to me to look up the biographical note, which told me that she is the award-winning author of four novels, three novellas and a host of short stories that are considered among the best in contemporary Dutch literature. Then I read the story again and felt it completely differently. Interesting. I have now read the story three times and will probably read it again before sampling others with less sensual titles like "Sex for Fridge", "Plumbers," "Taboo" and (I hope it is not sensual) "Auntie Frosea." I am giving this 5 stars because I have already got value for money (it was 19 euros, which will barely buy you two lemonades and a croissant in Les Deux Magots). Nela and the Virgins, impressed me greatly, in spite of it being not what I was looking for and I have read it twice. If all the stories are this good it will turn out to have been 19 euros very well spent.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lizzie Bedell

    This is an absolutely fabulous compilation. A must read.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tuck

    this is so chock full of great writing one can start at any place and feel very satisfied. a few that particularly stand out for me are william owen roberts, hilary mantel, merce ibarz, enrique vila-matas, olga tokarczuk, danute kalinauskaite....well hell, i liked em all pretty much.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    See my video book review in The Collagist here: http://www.dzancbooks.org/the-collagi... See my video book review in The Collagist here: http://www.dzancbooks.org/the-collagi...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Wonderful collection. Some very talented authors I'd probably never have come across otherwise. Wonderful collection. Some very talented authors I'd probably never have come across otherwise.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dan DiPiero

    The second installment of the Best European Fiction series begins with a question: what does it mean to be European? While it is true that the issue of a common continental identity was on the minds of the editors and readers of the first collection, it seems an even more vital question today, in the face of changing Greek and Italian regimes, the threat of Euro-instability, of economic collapse. Nations as independent and as deeply cultured as Greece and Germany are coming face to face with a q The second installment of the Best European Fiction series begins with a question: what does it mean to be European? While it is true that the issue of a common continental identity was on the minds of the editors and readers of the first collection, it seems an even more vital question today, in the face of changing Greek and Italian regimes, the threat of Euro-instability, of economic collapse. Nations as independent and as deeply cultured as Greece and Germany are coming face to face with a question of whether or not their commonalities outweigh their differences. As Larry Rohter points out in the New York Times, “Certainly there is no lack of variety or daring in the work Mr. Hemon has assembled. Some of the writers…are well known, but several others are being translated into English for the first time. The oldest contributor was born in 1941, the youngest in 1981; both are women, who account for a dozen of the works chosen. There is even a story…from Turkey, a country that the European Union seems to consider insufficiently European, and also one from tiny Lichtenstein.” Can commonalities be found here among such a varied cast? Among stories borne from Communist rule and other, lighter reads? Does this collection reflect what it means to be a European, or simply a European writer? Interestingly, though the collection showcases the diversity of its contributions, some sort of a common aesthetic does emerge, regardless of subject or style. The stories here tend to be short, which I find incredibly welcome not because they are difficult to read, but because they are dense and thoughtful. The preface of this collection starts with a question; the introduction gives a recommendation: “I therefore implore you…to take your time and not rush…” It is appropriate advice for the kind of work collected here–brief, rich, and varied. Approached in this way, with one story at a time, perhaps before bed, perhaps while you work your way through a novel, your appreciation is guaranteed. America has recently been accused of literary isolationism. With a collection like this, there is no excuse not to begin fighting that claim. Worth owning.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    "In this respect, I thought, he was like Garfield-I mean the cat. His presence or absence made no difference to the rest of the text. Nevertheless, he felt that he had a legitimate right to sit there, to do nothing more than waste space. So Colonel Enke was a sort of literary Garfield. Yet Garfield, the original, was alive and well, despite his uselessness, his obsolescence-giving orders, playing colonel, and being well paid for the privilege." -Ersan Üldes-- "Professional Behavior" (Turkey) A gre "In this respect, I thought, he was like Garfield-I mean the cat. His presence or absence made no difference to the rest of the text. Nevertheless, he felt that he had a legitimate right to sit there, to do nothing more than waste space. So Colonel Enke was a sort of literary Garfield. Yet Garfield, the original, was alive and well, despite his uselessness, his obsolescence-giving orders, playing colonel, and being well paid for the privilege." -Ersan Üldes-- "Professional Behavior" (Turkey) A great collection of stories. There's something like 30 stories all together from many small countries we never hear anything about literarily. the collection highlights how global we've become: the Swiss writer sets her piece in Montreal, The French in California, The Bulgarian in Germany, The Hungarian and German in Italy. Still, occasionally there's that moment upon reflection where I think "That story was so Irish...," or "That story was so Cypriotic..." I liked the forward by Colum McCann and Alexsander Hemon is an engaging editor: there were a wide range of lands represented and an array of subject matter. BEF 2010 featured its stories alphabetically by country, BEF 2011 presents the stories in reverse alphabetical order, I can't wait for the 2012 edition.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Marie

    Liechtenstein (Dust) "The researchers attempted to establish a baseline of zero emotion by examining ordinary household dust." "I am that which remains when you have understood. Something exhausted, empty, but free." "You only really see what other people are like when they're having a crisis." How a person behaves at the bottom of the barrel shows you that sort of stuff that person is made of." Estonia (Beyond the Window a Park is Dimming) "She was sincere and just a little bit unhappy - as if a chea Liechtenstein (Dust) "The researchers attempted to establish a baseline of zero emotion by examining ordinary household dust." "I am that which remains when you have understood. Something exhausted, empty, but free." "You only really see what other people are like when they're having a crisis." How a person behaves at the bottom of the barrel shows you that sort of stuff that person is made of." Estonia (Beyond the Window a Park is Dimming) "She was sincere and just a little bit unhappy - as if a cheap cup had fallen from her fingers and shattered into pieces." "Everything good in this world must surely come to an end sooner of later." "It seemed to him that he was now like a novelist who has dozens of possible plot twists available to him." "He would have an easier time of living if he completely withdrew into his shell." "feeling that he’d gotten stuck on the wrong side of the glass."

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tuxlie

    《最佳欧洲小说(2011)》The launch of Dalkey’s Best European Fiction series was nothing short of phenomenal. For 2011, Aleksandar Hemon is back as editor, along with a new preface by Colum McCann, and with a whole new cast of authors and stories, including work from countries not included in Best European Fiction 2010. “最佳欧洲小说”是欧洲文学出版社甄选出的欧洲当年或近年最佳欧洲小说作品,相当于欧洲小说的年鉴,体现欧洲文学前沿的高度。长期以来,由于小语种语言的限制,国内读者对欧洲文学的了解大多是源自西欧文学,而这本书却给读者以领略整个欧洲文学精神风貌的机会,甄选作品的国度达到四十个,无论是英国、德国这样的老牌文学强国,还是拉脱维亚、爱沙尼亚、立陶宛、波黑、克罗地亚、马其顿这样的文学小户;既 《最佳欧洲小说(2011)》The launch of Dalkey’s Best European Fiction series was nothing short of phenomenal. For 2011, Aleksandar Hemon is back as editor, along with a new preface by Colum McCann, and with a whole new cast of authors and stories, including work from countries not included in Best European Fiction 2010. “最佳欧洲小说”是欧洲文学出版社甄选出的欧洲当年或近年最佳欧洲小说作品,相当于欧洲小说的年鉴,体现欧洲文学前沿的高度。长期以来,由于小语种语言的限制,国内读者对欧洲文学的了解大多是源自西欧文学,而这本书却给读者以领略整个欧洲文学精神风貌的机会,甄选作品的国度达到四十个,无论是英国、德国这样的老牌文学强国,还是拉脱维亚、爱沙尼亚、立陶宛、波黑、克罗地亚、马其顿这样的文学小户;既有声名煊赫的作家也有新发掘的潜力新人,其中包括今年曼布克奖得主希拉里·曼特尔,他们代表了欧洲文学整体的趋势和走向。多样化的地域文学特点和多样性的文风,使得本书宛若流动着的“欧洲当代文学” 文学地图。中国读者可从中领略广博多姿的欧洲多元文化,这也是国内出版界首次如此细致并成规模译介欧洲当代文学新作。本书由著名译者李文俊老师领衔,结集国内外优秀译者,译本权威。

  11. 4 out of 5

    Val

    This collection of European fiction contains a short story called "Dust" by Stefan Sprenger from Liechtenstein. I read it for my World Tour, but have not read all the other stories in the book yet. Stefan Sprenger's story is a quirky meditation on emotion, representation in art, capturing the essence of both of them and life, guilt for the terrible things humans can do to each other and the world, God, the Gulf War and dust. I liked it and I hope some more of his work becomes available in transl This collection of European fiction contains a short story called "Dust" by Stefan Sprenger from Liechtenstein. I read it for my World Tour, but have not read all the other stories in the book yet. Stefan Sprenger's story is a quirky meditation on emotion, representation in art, capturing the essence of both of them and life, guilt for the terrible things humans can do to each other and the world, God, the Gulf War and dust. I liked it and I hope some more of his work becomes available in translation.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kate

    I have read collections of short stories by a single author that I've enjoyed, but I guess I finally have to admit that I'm just not crazy about short stories in general. There are some good ones in this mix of European writers, but I ended up kind of picking and choosing and walking away dissatisfied. No story inspired me to look for more work by the same author. I'm marking it as finished, but truthfully, I didn't read every single story and can't judge this fairly as a result. I have read collections of short stories by a single author that I've enjoyed, but I guess I finally have to admit that I'm just not crazy about short stories in general. There are some good ones in this mix of European writers, but I ended up kind of picking and choosing and walking away dissatisfied. No story inspired me to look for more work by the same author. I'm marking it as finished, but truthfully, I didn't read every single story and can't judge this fairly as a result.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ben Jaques-Leslie

    Some moments were utterly brilliant and some just made me wonder why writers felt like they should let people read their work. Hillary Mantel's story was wonderful and touching. Several of the stories by Eastern European authors also stood out. They tended to harken back to the days of socialism, which gives them both a surreal and nostalgic sense. I'd recommend only reading the stories that grab you right away; the ones that don't probably won't at all. Some moments were utterly brilliant and some just made me wonder why writers felt like they should let people read their work. Hillary Mantel's story was wonderful and touching. Several of the stories by Eastern European authors also stood out. They tended to harken back to the days of socialism, which gives them both a surreal and nostalgic sense. I'd recommend only reading the stories that grab you right away; the ones that don't probably won't at all.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Valerie W

    This collection has many dark stories that touch on several subject matters. My favorite is Plumbers by Alex Popov for the humor amidst the more serious pieces and great rhythm and descriptions. Otherwise, it was a bit hard to get through; I did not read all the stories but got through around 50% of them.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Veach Glines

    Forgettable

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    Some writing from authors I've never heard of and probably would never read. Liked most pieces, disliked some; liked some alot and some day might look for more of their works in translation. Some writing from authors I've never heard of and probably would never read. Liked most pieces, disliked some; liked some alot and some day might look for more of their works in translation.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Gurldoggie

    A phenomenal series. Read it slowly over a few months. Come back to it again and again.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Suesaroo

    I enjoy the glimpses into other cultures from the translated fiction.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Kelly

    There were some short stories I enjoyed immensely, others not so much. But I am embarrassed to admit I found myself skimming some of the short stories just to get through them.

  20. 4 out of 5

    French Books USA Cultural Services of the French Embassy

    Includes a translation of Eric Laurrent's novel "American Diary" and "Lou Dancing" by Belgium author François Emmanuel. Includes a translation of Eric Laurrent's novel "American Diary" and "Lou Dancing" by Belgium author François Emmanuel.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kate Throp

    This is going in my bedside table to be dipped into from time to time. Has a great range of short stories but I particularly bought it for Dust by Stefan Sprenger for the Liechtenstein leg of my around the world reading journey. I still have no idea what it was about but I loved it. Does that make sense?

  22. 4 out of 5

    persis

  23. 5 out of 5

    Howard Burman

  24. 4 out of 5

    Margaret

  25. 5 out of 5

    ne

  26. 4 out of 5

    Noorali

  27. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  28. 4 out of 5

    Warwick

  29. 5 out of 5

    Zuzana

  30. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...