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Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill

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Betsy, Tacy, and Tib can't wait to be ten. After all, getting two numbers in your age is the beginning of growing up—exciting things are bound to happen. And they do! The girls fall in love with the King of Spain, perform in the School Entertainment, and for the first time, go all the way over the Big Hill to Little Syria by themselves. There Betsy, Tacy, and Tib make new Betsy, Tacy, and Tib can't wait to be ten. After all, getting two numbers in your age is the beginning of growing up—exciting things are bound to happen. And they do! The girls fall in love with the King of Spain, perform in the School Entertainment, and for the first time, go all the way over the Big Hill to Little Syria by themselves. There Betsy, Tacy, and Tib make new friends and learn a thing or two. They learn that new Americans are sometimes the best Americans. And they learn that they themselves wouldn't want to be anything else. Ever since their first publication in the 1940s, the Betsy-Tacy stories have been loved by each generation of young readers.


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Betsy, Tacy, and Tib can't wait to be ten. After all, getting two numbers in your age is the beginning of growing up—exciting things are bound to happen. And they do! The girls fall in love with the King of Spain, perform in the School Entertainment, and for the first time, go all the way over the Big Hill to Little Syria by themselves. There Betsy, Tacy, and Tib make new Betsy, Tacy, and Tib can't wait to be ten. After all, getting two numbers in your age is the beginning of growing up—exciting things are bound to happen. And they do! The girls fall in love with the King of Spain, perform in the School Entertainment, and for the first time, go all the way over the Big Hill to Little Syria by themselves. There Betsy, Tacy, and Tib make new friends and learn a thing or two. They learn that new Americans are sometimes the best Americans. And they learn that they themselves wouldn't want to be anything else. Ever since their first publication in the 1940s, the Betsy-Tacy stories have been loved by each generation of young readers.

30 review for Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill

  1. 5 out of 5

    Beth Bonini

    This book begins with Tacy, Tib and finally Betsy (on April 25) turning 10: the double-digit birthday that is a turning point in every childhood. Appropriately, the book's main adventure has to do with widening horizons. When the girls climb the 'big hill' and go into the forbidden territory of Little Syria, they are doing so for self-interested reasons. (The younger sisters are in competition with their older sisters to get signatures for a contest.) But the real adventure, the true learning ex This book begins with Tacy, Tib and finally Betsy (on April 25) turning 10: the double-digit birthday that is a turning point in every childhood. Appropriately, the book's main adventure has to do with widening horizons. When the girls climb the 'big hill' and go into the forbidden territory of Little Syria, they are doing so for self-interested reasons. (The younger sisters are in competition with their older sisters to get signatures for a contest.) But the real adventure, the true learning experience, happens when the girls befriend the Syrian/Lebanese neighbours who have recently become part of the Deep Valley community. One of the (many) reasons that I love the Betsy-Tacy books is that they depict the world of small-town Minnesota so beautifully, and yet also give the reader surprising glimpses and insights into the wider world. When the girls stand up against the bullies who are bothering their new friend Naifi, Tib's dress gets torn. But Tib's mother assures them she is glad that Tib defended her new friend, even at the expense of her best dress. "Foreign people should not be treated like that. America is made up of foreign people." This book takes place in 1902, and was published in 1942, but its message is still relevant. I was enchanted by the Betsy-Tacy books when I was a little girl growing up in the 1970s, and I'm delighted to discover that they still retain their charm. They are wonderful books about friendship - and about growing up.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Christina DeVane

    My favorite part in this story was Betsy and her friends writing to the king of Spain which really happened in the author’s childhood. Betsy is 10 in this book, so girls around this age would thoroughly enjoy this!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Lisa (not getting friends updates) Vegan

    I am so enjoying this series. This is the third book and possibly my favorite so far, and I liked the second book more than the first, but that's hard to say because they're all so good. I have the fourth one to read before I get to the (middle) two in the series which are the only two that I think I read as a girl; I'll remember when I read them if I did. I'm glad that this time I'm reading them in order from start to finish. Maud Hart Lovelace is a talented storyteller and she has a vivid recol I am so enjoying this series. This is the third book and possibly my favorite so far, and I liked the second book more than the first, but that's hard to say because they're all so good. I have the fourth one to read before I get to the (middle) two in the series which are the only two that I think I read as a girl; I'll remember when I read them if I did. I'm glad that this time I'm reading them in order from start to finish. Maud Hart Lovelace is a talented storyteller and she has a vivid recollection of her childhood. I love reading about this more innocent time. Betsy and her friends turn ten in this book and it takes place in 1902. She gets the experience of being a child exactly right and doesn't talk down at all to kids, which I really appreciate. I really loved the American immigrant sub-plot in this book, and the book ends with a 4th of July event, and I finished reading it on 7/3 so that was fun. This edition has some wonderful childhood photos of Maud and her friends, family, neighbors, and notes so that the reader can see how much these books are based on Maud’s life. How on earth did I not read all of these books when I was young?! I’m always kidding my friends what deprived childhoods they had because they missed reading some of my favorite children’s books, but now I feel I’m the deprived one to have missed reading these books.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    The fun continues in this third installment of Maud Hart Lovelace's wonderful Betsy-Tacy series, which follows the adventures of three young girls - Betsy (Elizabeth) Ray, Tacy (Anastacia) Kelly, and Tib (Thelma) Muller - as they grow up in early twentieth-century Minnesota. In Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill, the three friends celebrate their tenth birthdays, fall in love (all together) with the young King of Spain, and visit Little Syria - the colony of Lebanese immigrants just outside of The fun continues in this third installment of Maud Hart Lovelace's wonderful Betsy-Tacy series, which follows the adventures of three young girls - Betsy (Elizabeth) Ray, Tacy (Anastacia) Kelly, and Tib (Thelma) Muller - as they grow up in early twentieth-century Minnesota. In Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill, the three friends celebrate their tenth birthdays, fall in love (all together) with the young King of Spain, and visit Little Syria - the colony of Lebanese immigrants just outside of Deep Valley. Lovelace's prose is deceptively simple, and the events she chronicles are rarely earth-shattering, but somehow the narrative she creates - of friends and family, of school-life and childhood play - is as compelling as it is heartwarming. I was particularly struck by the sub-plot involving Naifa and her family, who are so determined to be good Americans, and - given the autobiographical nature of the series - wondered if the author had a young Lebanese friend as a girl. All in all, I find that the more I read of Betsy, Tacy and Tib, the more I want to read! My only complaint thus far is that each story ends far too quickly!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    Well, this one is a weird mix of American patriotism, pro-immigration stances and your first celebrity crush. Didactic is really the word for it, especially when you get sentences like: 'Katie recited the Gettysburg Address. She despised reciting but was too patriotic to refuse.' But there's a lovely, idyllic feel to these books, which I'm beginning to appreciate, and Betsy, Tacy and Tib are rather identifiable, which I suppose is what Maud Hart Lovelace wants. The title is also misleading, but I Well, this one is a weird mix of American patriotism, pro-immigration stances and your first celebrity crush. Didactic is really the word for it, especially when you get sentences like: 'Katie recited the Gettysburg Address. She despised reciting but was too patriotic to refuse.' But there's a lovely, idyllic feel to these books, which I'm beginning to appreciate, and Betsy, Tacy and Tib are rather identifiable, which I suppose is what Maud Hart Lovelace wants. The title is also misleading, but I blame the publisher for that.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Melody

    9/2012 Oh, Bob Ray, how I love you. I always refer to my own father as "practically perfect" because he's not Bob Ray. I love this book almost as much as I love Bob Ray. Everyone's personality is here, foreshadowing so much (just like Tib!) though this time through I did wonder when Dave's mom got her hearing back. 12/2009 This story finds Betsy, Tacy and Tib at ten years old. Their world is getting wider, and they are learning new things. This is the first time that the Lebanese settlement of L 9/2012 Oh, Bob Ray, how I love you. I always refer to my own father as "practically perfect" because he's not Bob Ray. I love this book almost as much as I love Bob Ray. Everyone's personality is here, foreshadowing so much (just like Tib!) though this time through I did wonder when Dave's mom got her hearing back. 12/2009 This story finds Betsy, Tacy and Tib at ten years old. Their world is getting wider, and they are learning new things. This is the first time that the Lebanese settlement of Little Syria is mentioned in the series, and it's nicely done. Cultural differences are examined in a way that pre-teens will understand, and more importantly, care about. Relationships with elder siblings are handled with what appears to this only child to be truth and, well, beauty. Another lovely chapter in the Betsy-Tacy story. I don't know how to add the edition I have, which is the original, titled Over The Big Hill. It was later changed to Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill help people associate it with the series.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Susann

    Re-read for VSC discussion. "Tacy loved to say 'indeed.'" 09-23-2011: Here's a quote from the sentimental Mrs. Kelly that I had never noticed before: "Mrs. Kelly did not seem to notice the grown-upness. She took Betsy's round red cheeks in her hands and said, 'It's five years today that you and Tacy have been friends.'" I love Mrs. Kelly. Love that she saves Tacy's shorn curl in a candy box and that she remarks on the longevity of B&T's friendship. Re-read for the VSC discussion. Re-read for VSC discussion. "Tacy loved to say 'indeed.'" 09-23-2011: Here's a quote from the sentimental Mrs. Kelly that I had never noticed before: "Mrs. Kelly did not seem to notice the grown-upness. She took Betsy's round red cheeks in her hands and said, 'It's five years today that you and Tacy have been friends.'" I love Mrs. Kelly. Love that she saves Tacy's shorn curl in a candy box and that she remarks on the longevity of B&T's friendship. Re-read for the VSC discussion.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Hope

    Another delightful book in the Betsy and Tacy series. I appreciate it that the girls are not sickeningly sweet, but that they learn and grow as they relate to others. In this installment they befriend a little girl who is a Syrian refugee and through her they learn some important lessons about kindness, forgiveness, and patriotism.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    This book had more of a storyline than the first two. I enjoy reading about the friendships of these three sweet girls, but could especially relate to the bond, competitions, and love of sisters.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carmen Maloy

    Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill is the third book in the timeless Betsy-Tacy-Tib series. In this latest chapter in the trio's childhood, the girls begin to develop with age and maturity. First the girls turned ten which is a big deal for them, especially for Betsy. They finally have two numbers for their age. The second big moment for the girls is they develop their very first crush on the newly annointed King of Spain named Alphonso. And the third pivotal moment in their young lives is when Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill is the third book in the timeless Betsy-Tacy-Tib series. In this latest chapter in the trio's childhood, the girls begin to develop with age and maturity. First the girls turned ten which is a big deal for them, especially for Betsy. They finally have two numbers for their age. The second big moment for the girls is they develop their very first crush on the newly annointed King of Spain named Alphonso. And the third pivotal moment in their young lives is when they meet a community of Syrians in Deep Valley who has not exactly been greeted warmly by its natives. It is so much fun watching the girls grow up in this series. The tone of Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill is slightly more somber yet realistic than the previous two books since it briefly touches on prejudice and unrequited first love. The Betsy-Tacy books were highly autobiographical and Lovelace perfectly captures the innocence and magic of childhood. If you read this book and love it, please read the series. It will be books that you will never forget as long as you live. I also recommend the "Betsy-Tacy Companion" which is an amazing book that disects each book and compares it to it's real-life counterparts, including pictures of the "real" Betsy, Tacy, Tib and all the gang. I had the pleasure of visiting "Deep Valley" (aka Mankato, Minnesota) for a Betsy-Tacy convention back in 1996. It was incredible to step back in time and enter Betsy's world. We toured the city and I was actually able to step foot in "Tacy's" bedroom and sit on the famous bench at the top of the big hill. It was truly a life-altering experience. I have to thank my sister, Julie for introducting these books to me and changing my life. It's obvious how much these books mean to me. My first born child was named Tacy Kelly Maloy. Please read and enjoy. They are a treasure!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lawrence

    I read the Betsy and Tacy books for the joy of it, and this one does not disappoint. The series is plainly not about people frozen in time. I mean, the period stays the same, but, as in really good books, the people change. Here, our heroines turn ten years old --- an important age that they've been anticipating since the last book. They become more self-conscious in that they begin to think independently about how they should behave at their "advanced age". As realistically narrated, they are u I read the Betsy and Tacy books for the joy of it, and this one does not disappoint. The series is plainly not about people frozen in time. I mean, the period stays the same, but, as in really good books, the people change. Here, our heroines turn ten years old --- an important age that they've been anticipating since the last book. They become more self-conscious in that they begin to think independently about how they should behave at their "advanced age". As realistically narrated, they are unsuccessful in this foray into self awareness. They also become somewhat more adventurous and autonomous. They are certainly beginning to individuate albeit in the messy way that we all do. In this respect, a huge dispute develops with all the necessary irrationality and spitefulness and even --- yes --- violence. The weakness of this book is the sub-story of the Syrian town and its people. I think our dear Maud, who was probably hard as nails, could have done better than this sappy stuff.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Judy

    I wonder how many kids read the Foreword by Judy Blume and the notes at the end of the book. Now that I know the story is semi-autobiographical, I understand why the books in this series seem so real. Here's an example of a paragraph that put a smile on my face: "The sooner we don't see them the better, I think," said Betsy gloomily. "Gee whiz!" she added. Betsy very seldom said "Gee whiz!" She was too religious. But it was all she could think of to express her feelings now. ("Them" being their old I wonder how many kids read the Foreword by Judy Blume and the notes at the end of the book. Now that I know the story is semi-autobiographical, I understand why the books in this series seem so real. Here's an example of a paragraph that put a smile on my face: "The sooner we don't see them the better, I think," said Betsy gloomily. "Gee whiz!" she added. Betsy very seldom said "Gee whiz!" She was too religious. But it was all she could think of to express her feelings now. ("Them" being their older sisters.) The closing sentences reflect the upbeat tone of the books: [Betsy and Tacy and Tib] soon stopped being ten years old. But whatever age they were seemed to be exactly the right age for having fun.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kathryn

    The third book is this cute series. It was fun to ready about the innocence of an era gone by.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Still enjoyable. 4 Stars, family read-aloud, #betsytacy2019, VT 2019 Reading Challenge: a book for children or teens

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mela

    I liked this part too, but it was less... Hard to tell what exactly less. I just enjoyed the previous two parts much more.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alisha

    Just a couple of excerpts...this book had some great passages! All three Wisconsin girls turn ten years old, and...fall in love with the King of Spain? Yup. They sang to the tune of "Mine eyes have seen the glory," but they made up the words themselves: "Oh, Betsey's ten tomorrow, And then all of us are ten, We will all grow up tomorrow, We will all be ladies then..." ------------------------------ "That was our last parade, I expect," said Betsy. "Why?" asked Tib. "I think they're fun." "We're getting t Just a couple of excerpts...this book had some great passages! All three Wisconsin girls turn ten years old, and...fall in love with the King of Spain? Yup. They sang to the tune of "Mine eyes have seen the glory," but they made up the words themselves: "Oh, Betsey's ten tomorrow, And then all of us are ten, We will all grow up tomorrow, We will all be ladies then..." ------------------------------ "That was our last parade, I expect," said Betsy. "Why?" asked Tib. "I think they're fun." "We're getting too old for them," Tacy said. "That's right," said Betsy. "Marching along and yelling will seem pretty childish after tomorrow." "I suppose we'll start having tea parties," said Tacy. "Yes. We'll crook our little fingers over the cups like this," answered Betsy, crooking her little finger in a very elegant way. "We'll say 'indeed' to each other," said Tacy. "And 'prefer'," said Betsy. "Will it be fun?" asked Tib. She sounded as though she didn't think it would be. "Fun or not," said Betsy, "we have to grow up. Everyone does." ---------------------------------------

  17. 4 out of 5

    Danielle

    This year Betsy, Tacey, and Tib have two numbers in their age, and they go farther up the Big Hill than ever before. Imagine my surprise when what what is over the hill is the neighborhood of Little Syria. And my further surprise when Little Syria and its Syrian immigrants end up being a major story line. How unexpected and wonderful! I love that the real event of the King of Spain assuming power on his 16th birthday in 1902 is included here, and that they all decide they are in love with him. I This year Betsy, Tacey, and Tib have two numbers in their age, and they go farther up the Big Hill than ever before. Imagine my surprise when what what is over the hill is the neighborhood of Little Syria. And my further surprise when Little Syria and its Syrian immigrants end up being a major story line. How unexpected and wonderful! I love that the real event of the King of Spain assuming power on his 16th birthday in 1902 is included here, and that they all decide they are in love with him. I love that they fight on behalf of an immigrant girl being teased. I love that they all go to different churches. Still such a lovely and timely story. Now that I know it's 1902, I wish we'd had a bit about turn-of-the-century celebrations in a previous book. I imagine it must have been quite exciting. Even in Deep Valley.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Re-reading the series with Birdy.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Meira (readingbooksinisrael)

    I don't think I can rate this properly because I moved straight on to the next book. I thought the Syrian neighborhood was well done but that it dragged on for a little too long. I don't think I can rate this properly because I moved straight on to the next book. I thought the Syrian neighborhood was well done but that it dragged on for a little too long.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn

    I really liked the plot of this story! My favorite part was when the girls, Julia, Katie, Betsy, Tacy and Tib, went out for votes on who should be queen. Great ending, too!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Erin Estes

    Pretty good, I just didn't really like the kings and queens parts. I DO appreciate how they really just said "🚫" to racism. That's always good. Pretty good, I just didn't really like the kings and queens parts. I DO appreciate how they really just said "🚫" to racism. That's always good.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Medora

    It's definitely my favorite my book I really loved reading it 😀 It's definitely my favorite my book I really loved reading it 😀

  23. 4 out of 5

    BookSweetie

    Simply terrific. If you have never ready BETSY AND TACY GO OVER THE BIG HILL (first published in 1942), prepare yourself for a charming glimpse into what it might be like to be a nine or ten year old girl. Book 3 of the highly recommended and soothingly warm-hearted Besty-Tacy juvenile classic series by Maud Hart Lovelace (April 25, 1892 - March 11, 1980) is a book closely based on the author's own life as a 9-10 year old growing up in small town Minnesota in 1902. The book opens with sentiment Simply terrific. If you have never ready BETSY AND TACY GO OVER THE BIG HILL (first published in 1942), prepare yourself for a charming glimpse into what it might be like to be a nine or ten year old girl. Book 3 of the highly recommended and soothingly warm-hearted Besty-Tacy juvenile classic series by Maud Hart Lovelace (April 25, 1892 - March 11, 1980) is a book closely based on the author's own life as a 9-10 year old growing up in small town Minnesota in 1902. The book opens with sentiments that feel as authentic today as when first written: "Betsy, Tacy, and Tib, were nine years old, and they were very anxious to be ten. 'You have two numbers in your age when you are ten. It's the beginning of growing up,' Betsy would say. Then the three of them felt solemn and important and pleased. They could hardly wait for their birthdays." The main character is Betsy (Elizabeth) Ray, whose tenth birthday, like the author's, happens in April. Her two best friends are Tacy (Anastacia) and Tib (Thelma). Tacy turns ten in January and Tib in March, but "they didn't say very much about being ten. They were too polite." They waited so Betsy wouldn't feel left out. Who wouldn't want friends like that? I loved the Harper Trophy 2000 paperback edition with its illustrations by Lois Lenski, its foreword by the children's literature icon Judy Blume and, after the story, the two sections with photos and prose titled "Maud Hart Lovelace and Her World" and "About BETSY AND TACY GO OVER THE BIG HILL." Don't miss the photo of Maud's friend Midge Gerlach, the author's model for Tib, posing sweetly in her accordion-pleated dress. The series follows Betsy from her early childhood years through her young adulthood. The early books are written more simply than the later books. I was lukewarm about the first two books in the series. They lacked narrative pizazz. Not so Book 3. The story, perhaps because the characters are older and more complex, develops and builds in a more satisfying way. Plot issues involve birthday celebrations, the girls' first "celebrity" crush on a historic figure (a young King Alphonso of Spain), encounters with a newly arrived Syrian immigrant girl named Naifa and a Syrian immigrant community "over the big hill," sibling conflicts, bullying, and a neighborhood celebration with a patriotic flavor. Readers may wonder if there really was a Syrian immigrant community in the author's childhood home town community of Mankato, Minnesota. The answer is YES! From page 178: "It was called Tinkcomville after its founder, James Ray Tinkcom. Like Mr. Meecham in the story, Mr. Tinkcom came to Mankato from New York and in 1873 bought all the land in the valley. He…sold parcels of land to a group of immigrants in the 1890s. (Although the immigrants called themselves Syrians, they were actually of Lebanese descent…) And just like Betsy, Tacy, and Tib, Maud and her friends enjoyed visiting the friendly community, which seemed exotic to them." Maud, herself, wrote that there had been a "rumor which used to enthrall us that one Syrian child was a princess." There is no evidence confirming the existence of an immigrant princess in the Syrian colony, but that idea clearly captured the author's imagination and influenced her fictional plot line. And, yes, Maud and her friends, like their fictional counterparts, really did write to Alphonso, the King of Spain, who was indeed crowned on May 17, 1902, the date used in the story. If the characters feel very real to you, as they do to me, in spite of the decades that have passed, it is almost certainly because of Maud Hart Lovelace's attention to historic detail as well as the fact that her writing was based upon her own childhood diaries about real people and events. Highly recommended.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Katie Fitzgerald

    This review also appears on my blog, Read-at-Home Mom. Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill is the third book of the Betsy-Tacy series, in which the three main characters, Betsy, Tacy, and Tib turn ten years old. Feeling quite grownup, the girls make their way over the big hill for the first time, exploring the interesting people and cultural experiences to be found there. In addition to making friends with a Syrian girl and defending her from racist bullies, they also fall in love with the King o This review also appears on my blog, Read-at-Home Mom. Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill is the third book of the Betsy-Tacy series, in which the three main characters, Betsy, Tacy, and Tib turn ten years old. Feeling quite grownup, the girls make their way over the big hill for the first time, exploring the interesting people and cultural experiences to be found there. In addition to making friends with a Syrian girl and defending her from racist bullies, they also fall in love with the King of Spain, perform in an Entertainment at school, and get into a huge quarrel with big sisters Julia and Katie. It’s hard to remember as I read that these books are as old as they are. They read very much like contemporary middle grade historical fiction, and this story in particular addresses very contemporary issues. This book takes on topics like immigration, diversity, and racism and presents very progressive viewpoints on each one. There is a big emphasis on American nationalism, but there is also a deep appreciation for the roots of the girls’ Syrian neighbors, and for the customs that followed them from their home country. Though the three girls are fascinated with kings and queens, other characters in the story express different political opinions that subtly express some of the unrest that was driving immigrants from their homelands in the early 1900s. Politics aside, this book is also notable for being the first Betsy-Tacy book with a true plot. While the first two books were more episodic, this one has several threads running through it that culminate in one satisfying conclusion. This book also introduces a bit more tension into the girls’ relationship with Julia and Katie, which adds some conflict and drama to the story without sacrificing the overall gentle wholesomeness of the series. It’s also so refreshing to read a story in which the only romance is an imagined courtship between young girls and a young king. This book assumes an innocence on the part of ten-year-old girls that is developmentally appropriate and hugely encouraging. I love the way these books grow up along with their main characters. I believe this is part of why they are perennially popular - readers can follow Betsy to adulthood, and then pass the books on to their children to begin the cycle all over again. I’m looking forward to seeing what new and interesting things twelve-year-old Betsy, Tacy, and Tib will do in Betsy and Tacy Go Downtown.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Christine

    Okay, so I at least remember that this book was really good. I read it a over a week ago and I've been really busy so I kind have a lot to remember for reviewing. This book was just as childish (in a good way) as the first, but with more complex and mature struggles, ideas, and resolutions than the first books. I thought that Betsy, Tacy, and Tib really grew up in this story, they now had a desire for power, love, importance, and beauty. Their quarrel over whether Julia or Tib could be queen wa Okay, so I at least remember that this book was really good. I read it a over a week ago and I've been really busy so I kind have a lot to remember for reviewing. This book was just as childish (in a good way) as the first, but with more complex and mature struggles, ideas, and resolutions than the first books. I thought that Betsy, Tacy, and Tib really grew up in this story, they now had a desire for power, love, importance, and beauty. Their quarrel over whether Julia or Tib could be queen was really story-altering. For the first time, the girls tried to get votes and they experienced political rifts. Then there was the whole "King of Spain-oh, I think I'm in love with him" thing. The girls really began to sort out their feelings for the first time. They didn't really like him, they just admired him and were interested in his story. They had no idea what love was, they were simply trying to identify if they loved him or not. The girls even sent the king a letter! Silly little girls! These girls were so sweet and cute. I really loved reading this book in particular. It was bittersweet to watch the girls grow up and begin to try and understand bigger things and adventures beyond the safety of Hill Street. It will be even harder to watch them grow up to high school, but I think that after that it might get easier. Not really. *WEEP* *TEARS AND SNOTTY HANKIE*

  26. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Hunter

    Book 3 of the Betsy and Tacy series, and Maud Hart Lovelace continues to impress. Such a sweet story! It's impossible to reach the book's end without a smile on your face. Sure, it's a bit too perfect at the close as squabbles are resolved neatly and Syrian refugees are welcomed with open arms. It's cheesy, but I loved it. And the gleeful ending makes for a fun toddler read along experience. It's interesting to compare Maud Hart Lovelace's handling of patriotism to that of Laura Ingalls Wilder. W Book 3 of the Betsy and Tacy series, and Maud Hart Lovelace continues to impress. Such a sweet story! It's impossible to reach the book's end without a smile on your face. Sure, it's a bit too perfect at the close as squabbles are resolved neatly and Syrian refugees are welcomed with open arms. It's cheesy, but I loved it. And the gleeful ending makes for a fun toddler read along experience. It's interesting to compare Maud Hart Lovelace's handling of patriotism to that of Laura Ingalls Wilder. While LIW takes a harder America-as-exceptional approach, MHL seems to prefer the softer melting pot approach to immigration. MHL waves the American flag as much as LIW does, but the overall feel is one of "America the Beautiful", not "Battle Hymn of the Republic. I enjoyed Betsy and Tacy Go Over the Big Hill's anti-bulling and anti-bigotry stances. I suspect I'd have liked the heck out of MHL if I'd had the privilege to meet her. As with the first two books of the series, Lois Lenski's beautiful drawings combined with MHL's knack for remembering and describing events from her childhood in Mankato, MN make the third installment of Betsy and Tacy worth the effort. Highly recommended.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Crizzle

    (2016): The third Betsy/Tacy/Tib book had a good portion of the plot about the Syrian refugees who lived in Minnesota... keep in mind it was published in 1942 and is set in 1902: "I'm glad Tib stood up for the little Syrian girl. Foreign people should not be treated like that. America is made up of foreign people." And after the Syrians showed their pride in living in America: "Julia said soberly, 'They think a lot of being Americans, don't they?' 'They certainly do,' Katie answered. 'Boys like (2016): The third Betsy/Tacy/Tib book had a good portion of the plot about the Syrian refugees who lived in Minnesota... keep in mind it was published in 1942 and is set in 1902: "I'm glad Tib stood up for the little Syrian girl. Foreign people should not be treated like that. America is made up of foreign people." And after the Syrians showed their pride in living in America: "Julia said soberly, 'They think a lot of being Americans, don't they?' 'They certainly do,' Katie answered. 'Boys like Sam ought to know more about them,' said Tib. Tib sometimes said very sensible things." I think a good portion of modern America should read these sweet, true words written last century for children. (2017): This is the first of the series that has a continuous plot throughout the whole book, instead of loosely-connected stories from chapter to chapter. Molly and I still laugh over "KOS - siiighhhh!"

  28. 4 out of 5

    Megan

    I didn't read this Betsy-Tacy book till I moved to California and had a renewed interest in the life of Maud Hart Lovelace after finding the friendship bench in Claremont. I feel it may be her best story. Rather then being a series of vignettes, as most of her books are, it tells a lovely concise story about the Syrian refugee camp that the girls visit. And what they find there is what one finds at any Minnesota refugee camp: pure good hearted Christians who take Betsy, Tacy and Tib into their c I didn't read this Betsy-Tacy book till I moved to California and had a renewed interest in the life of Maud Hart Lovelace after finding the friendship bench in Claremont. I feel it may be her best story. Rather then being a series of vignettes, as most of her books are, it tells a lovely concise story about the Syrian refugee camp that the girls visit. And what they find there is what one finds at any Minnesota refugee camp: pure good hearted Christians who take Betsy, Tacy and Tib into their care, teach them about hookahs and figs and goats and Arabic, and all other good things that come from Syria. And in turn the girls crown their little Naifi an "American Queen" and read her the Gettysburg Address and sing her patriotic songs. Obviously.

  29. 4 out of 5

    laaaaames

    I have a cold dark heart, and even I cannot resist the joy and charm of rereading these books as an adult. As a child I only read the first three. As of Saturday I now own all of them. If you suspect my stony disposition is showing signs of happiness over this fact as well as the anticipation of FIRST READS of books starring these beloved characters, you are quite right. I definitely recommend purchasing (or library-ing) the new editions to anyone who enjoyed these as a kid. The forewards are wonder I have a cold dark heart, and even I cannot resist the joy and charm of rereading these books as an adult. As a child I only read the first three. As of Saturday I now own all of them. If you suspect my stony disposition is showing signs of happiness over this fact as well as the anticipation of FIRST READS of books starring these beloved characters, you are quite right. I definitely recommend purchasing (or library-ing) the new editions to anyone who enjoyed these as a kid. The forewards are wonderful, and the historical information at the end of each volume is really insightful. (read: 30)

  30. 5 out of 5

    Rebekah Giese Witherspoon

    This third novel in the Betsy-Tacy series didn't have nearly as much wide-eyed wonder and imagination as the first two, but that's probably because Betsy, Tacy, and Tib are practically grown up now that they have two numbers in their age (10). When the three girls go over the big hill and meet a little girl who has immigrated from Syria and doesn't speak any English, their warm acceptance of her and her family starts a beautiful chain reaction in the community. I love the way that this series en This third novel in the Betsy-Tacy series didn't have nearly as much wide-eyed wonder and imagination as the first two, but that's probably because Betsy, Tacy, and Tib are practically grown up now that they have two numbers in their age (10). When the three girls go over the big hill and meet a little girl who has immigrated from Syria and doesn't speak any English, their warm acceptance of her and her family starts a beautiful chain reaction in the community. I love the way that this series encourages compassion and kindness without ever becoming preachy.

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