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“Louder Than Words takes us from an understanding of nonverbal behavior to an understanding of something far more valuable for success—nonverbal intelligence.” — Robert B. Cialdini, author of Influence: Science and Practice “Joe Navarro brings together the art and science of nonverbal communications for the business sector with the edge of a former FBI agent and the insight “Louder Than Words takes us from an understanding of nonverbal behavior to an understanding of something far more valuable for success—nonverbal intelligence.” — Robert B. Cialdini, author of Influence: Science and Practice “Joe Navarro brings together the art and science of nonverbal communications for the business sector with the edge of a former FBI agent and the insight of a world-class observer.” — Jack Canfield, co-author of The Success Principles Joe Navarro, bestselling author of What Every Body Is Saying and Phil Hellmuth Presents Read ‘Em and Reap and former FBI agent specializing in behavioral analysis, helps you successfully navigate the business world by training your brain to see what others are feeling, thinking, or intending. Job hunters and professionals of every ilk—as well as fans of the hit FOX television series Lie to Me—will find many helpful and effective tips to reading body language and microexpressions in Louder than Words.


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“Louder Than Words takes us from an understanding of nonverbal behavior to an understanding of something far more valuable for success—nonverbal intelligence.” — Robert B. Cialdini, author of Influence: Science and Practice “Joe Navarro brings together the art and science of nonverbal communications for the business sector with the edge of a former FBI agent and the insight “Louder Than Words takes us from an understanding of nonverbal behavior to an understanding of something far more valuable for success—nonverbal intelligence.” — Robert B. Cialdini, author of Influence: Science and Practice “Joe Navarro brings together the art and science of nonverbal communications for the business sector with the edge of a former FBI agent and the insight of a world-class observer.” — Jack Canfield, co-author of The Success Principles Joe Navarro, bestselling author of What Every Body Is Saying and Phil Hellmuth Presents Read ‘Em and Reap and former FBI agent specializing in behavioral analysis, helps you successfully navigate the business world by training your brain to see what others are feeling, thinking, or intending. Job hunters and professionals of every ilk—as well as fans of the hit FOX television series Lie to Me—will find many helpful and effective tips to reading body language and microexpressions in Louder than Words.

30 review for Louder Than Words: Take Your Career from Average to Exceptional with the Hidden Power of Nonverbal Intelligence

  1. 5 out of 5

    Loy Machedo

    Loy Machedo’s Book Review – Louder than Words by Joe Navarro (with Toni Sciarra Poynter) Joe Navarro, born 1953 is an author, public speaker and ex-FBI agent. He specializes in the area of nonverbal communication or body language and has authored the following books • Advanced Interviewing Techniques; Proven Strategies for Law Enforcement, Military, and Security Personnel. • Hunting Terrorists: A Look at The Psychopathology of Terror. • Read 'Em and Reap: A Career FBI Agent's Guide to Decoding Pok Loy Machedo’s Book Review – Louder than Words by Joe Navarro (with Toni Sciarra Poynter) Joe Navarro, born 1953 is an author, public speaker and ex-FBI agent. He specializes in the area of nonverbal communication or body language and has authored the following books • Advanced Interviewing Techniques; Proven Strategies for Law Enforcement, Military, and Security Personnel. • Hunting Terrorists: A Look at The Psychopathology of Terror. • Read 'Em and Reap: A Career FBI Agent's Guide to Decoding Poker Tells • What Every Body is Saying. • Louder Than Words: Take Your Career from Average to Exceptional with the Hidden Power of Nonverbal Intelligence. Now Louder than words is around 223 pages divided into 9 Chapters. On the plus side: • Brilliant observations: Small changes in the way you position your hands, your feet, the way you move your eyes, eye brows, lips, head – speak volumes. The book has revealed the practical side of real day-to-day non-verbal communication. • Tips & Suggestions: There are a few pages dedicated to the ‘how-you-can-succeed’ using the principles of non-verbal communication outlined in this book. • Out-of-the-box-approach: When someone says non-verbal body language, we tend to focus on the body by itself. However, Navarro goes further than that and points out to the surroundings, the messy desk, the excessive use of perfume, the clothes the person wore and quite a number of intricate details people tend to miss out on. I loved the emphasis on the external surroundings. On the negative side: • More visual examples: There were a few which were extremely useful. However, they were not enough. • The big question: The book poses as an observational text rather than a corrective manual. I am sure he could have given more suggestions and ideas. I am not sure why he didn’t choose to do so. • Formal is everything? There is too much focus on the formal side of business. I may be a bit prejudiced here as I am completely tattooed and he didn’t speak very highly of tattooed people – but that being said, there is a big world out there that does not necessarily live in the stiff-upper-lip-corporate world. So this is not a book that covers everything. Overall summary An intelligent summary of thoughts by a gentlemen who dedicated his life to the one of the toughest crime-fighting organizations in the world. A well written script and a very interesting read. I loved the simplicity, honest and truthfulness that glowed throughout the book. However, I know by reading in between the lines, there is a lot he could not spit out, by virtue of his association with one of the most top-secret camps in the world. Overall Rating 8.5 out of 10. It is indeed a good book. Loy Machedo loymachedo.com

  2. 5 out of 5

    Steve Cran

    Ever hear the expression “ actions speak louder than words”? Our actions in this instance is body language. Knowing how to read and interpret body language is a key tool to success. Body language though is a double edged sword. You also have to convey the right message. Joe Navarro is a former FBI agent. He had to use body language in order to stay alive and succeed in his career. In effect you might say he had to be a bit of a psychologist. Reading this book will teach you a good number of thing Ever hear the expression “ actions speak louder than words”? Our actions in this instance is body language. Knowing how to read and interpret body language is a key tool to success. Body language though is a double edged sword. You also have to convey the right message. Joe Navarro is a former FBI agent. He had to use body language in order to stay alive and succeed in his career. In effect you might say he had to be a bit of a psychologist. Reading this book will teach you a good number of things. First off when caught in;a fearful situation we have three options, fight , flight or freeze. In the office these would be situations that cause discomfort. The author uses a comfort/ discomfort paradigm in assessing body language. Such signs of discomfort would be squinting, rapid blinking, hyperventilating and nervous hand gestures. When questioning his suspects, Joe would let them get comfortable. After all a comfortable suspect is a cooperative suspect. Getting them comfortable allows you to set up a baseline and observe which behaviors denote what is comfortable for the individual you are dealing and also what denotes discomfort. When dealing with clients it is important that they feel comfortable working with you. Comfort equals safety and stability. This comfort would mean falling into step with your client which would entail mirroring back vocabulary that the client uses. For example if they describe their automobile you follow up using automobile. The emotional system will always trump our use of logic. When clients get angry then the best thing to do is let them ventilate. Let the ventilate to someone in charge so they know their complaints are being heard. Later the offending employee should write a letter of apology. This also gets rid of a lot of anger. Little things can spell the difference between success and failure. How you seat people at a meeting can prove to be very conducive for productive communication or communication failures. Usually you want to have people seated at 45 degrees to one another. Office set up is valuable as well. Have a couch that people can sit and be comfortable with, cold drinks is a good idea as well. Our body language and what we do sends a message. If you are meeting with someone important you may want to lean in and show interest . Playing with devices shows you don’t care. Image is almost everything.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Adalia

    As a fan of Criminal Minds, I was thinking that this book would be really helpful to read people like an open book but now I see that my expectations were really high. I'm disappointed, to be honest. The author repeats the same thing over and over. I regret what I've paid for this book. As a fan of Criminal Minds, I was thinking that this book would be really helpful to read people like an open book but now I see that my expectations were really high. I'm disappointed, to be honest. The author repeats the same thing over and over. I regret what I've paid for this book.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn

    Depending on how well you know me, you would know how much I love studying what people say (or don't say) and do (or don't do) specifically to detect deception. For my job, not my personal life, people! From what I have found, there are two main sources of information on this subject: 1. Philip Houston (with two supporting writers) who worked for the CIA and wrote "Spy the Lie" which I keep in my office and have read once and listened to twice, and 2. Joe Navarro, who worked for the FBI 25 years Depending on how well you know me, you would know how much I love studying what people say (or don't say) and do (or don't do) specifically to detect deception. For my job, not my personal life, people! From what I have found, there are two main sources of information on this subject: 1. Philip Houston (with two supporting writers) who worked for the CIA and wrote "Spy the Lie" which I keep in my office and have read once and listened to twice, and 2. Joe Navarro, who worked for the FBI 25 years catching spies and is someone who has become an expert on nonverbal communication. Joe is the author of this book. Reflecting on these two different authors and their styles, I think the main difference is Houston focuses on detecting when someone is telling a lie with the end result being a "gotcha" and Navarro's focus is more practical in that his purpose is to show us how to read nonverbals to help you present yourself in the best light, and to get to the truth to enhance communication. I've been chipping away at this book for a few weeks because it is a lot to digest. I have 110 highlights throughout a 242 page book so I know I will be going back over it again in the future. How do I condense this down to the key points of interest? Wish me luck. We are constantly making assessments of people (and they are of us) based on astonishingly small amounts of information. These are called "thin slice assessments". The first half of the book was focused on image and what we project to others based on nonverbals. Little things such as your perception of a security guard based on whether they are standing or sitting and the opinions people form based on your shoes. Not just the brand but if they are clean - a person can be well put together in all ways until you get to their dirty ratty shoes and it completely changes your image of the person. How about this for a nonverbal faux-pas? "The chairmen of the Big Three—Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler—went to Washington, D.C., to plead their case before Congress for $25 billion in taxpayer assistance. With millions of employees’ livelihoods hanging in the balance, they chose to travel to the nation’s capital on their company jets. Their nonverbal blunder earned them the scorn of Congress, the president, the unions, the press, and the average American worker. 'There’s a delicious irony,' said one congressman, 'in seeing private luxury jets flying into Washington, D.C., and people coming off of them with tin cups in their hands.'" There was a long section complete with pictures that talked about various expressions and ways of carrying ourselves and the messages they display. Eyebrows raised or eyes squinting, splaying legs and the position of your thumbs. If you are speaking with someone and their feet are pointing toward you, that's good. They are engaged and want to talk to you. Once a foot points away from you and perhaps with the torso also starting turn away, you can bet they want to wrap up the conversation. I found this good practical information - people do not always pick up on nonverbal messages that say "wrap it up, please" to the point where the only way to politely end the conversation is to stand up and start walking out of their office. Navarro suggests that you be aware of these nonverbal cues so as not to annoy your boss. Let's not just not annoy the boss but impress her or him. Lots and lots of pages were devoted to the importance of grooming and dressing in a certain way because all of that really matters. Whereas our country started with jeans on Friday, it now has become more and more casual and Joe believes that is a mistake because it affects people's perceptions of us whether we like to think so or not. This may make me unpopular by some, but I do agree that your credibility is compromised in a professional setting if you are wearing flip-flops! He also talks about nails not being overly long. I must agree with that, too. I have interviewed people with really long nails and it sure is distracting. He didn't only talk about women's appearance, but men's too. Clean and well manicured nails apply there, too. Ok moving on. My favorite nonverbal he talked about is ATTITUDE! He said that "a person's attitude is our most subtle nonverbal we have to master." He talked a lot about the importance of SMILING and what a huge difference it makes in any customer facing role yet how it is becoming less and less common. The pace with which you speak and your tone of voice -low, slow and smooth is best if you want to instill confidence. Who you hang around with at work, how attentive you are in meetings, not wearing too much jewelry ("excessive jewelry says 'I need people's attention'") and so much more. This book was packed, I am telling you! The second half of the book (and I will cover it much more quickly) seemed to be focused first on customer service related industries followed by reading nonberbals to aid in communication. For the customer service section he ran through a ton of examples such as how people are less likely to shop in a store with dirty windows and how impressed he was to see a Fed Ex driver cleaning a Fed Ex drop box with a bottle of Windex. He urges us to call our own company's switchboard and experience what our customers experience. Does the phone ring more than 2 times? Do you have a nightmare of an automated attendant? In the section on reading nonverbals for better communication he gave examples of how to read the eyes and body language to see if someone was being honest with you. Again, the purpose is not to catch someone in a lie but to give you a cue when you should ask more questions to uncover roadblocks or concerns the person may not initially tell you. The goal here is to ensure that people can deliver on time. If you ask if someone can complete a project and they touch their neck or swivel away or their eyes twitch, Joe suggests we slow down and use empathy - "you know, I want you to have work life balance and I am sure coming in on the weekend is not what you were hoping. What is a reasonable amount of time that you think you can commit to toward my request? " and that hopefully opens the door to the truth and a better relationship. I think you might be picking up from this that the book was utterly packed with good information. I will close this review with something that I found valuable and that I needed to read. I personally find detecting if someone is lying very difficult. There are a lot of clues to watch for and you can look for clusters of "tells" but how do we ever REALLY know if we have it right? Maybe he is suddenly talking faster not because he is lying but because his cell phone is alerting him his battery is almost dead? Near the end of the book Navarro writes: "You would think that, as a former FBI agent and a student of nonverbal communications for nearly four decades, I would be championing the use of nonverbal communications to detect deception. I would, if detecting deception were easy. I would, if such assessments could be at least 95 percent accurate. But it’s not easy and it is not nearly that accurate" He then goes on to say that with his tips we will probably only be right about 50% of the time and even his own highly trained FBI agents were able to detect deception accurately 60% of the time. I found that reassuring because despite pouring over this information time and time again, I think it has helped me in my job but I never feel 100% confident that I am predicting correctly. This reassured me that even the best of the best can't get it all the way right. I find the subject fascinating, though, so I will continue to try to be closer to 60% than 50%! If you are still reading....bless you for your patience and attention!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Starfire

    Very well written book on non-verbal communication in the workplace; although I possibly didn't enjoy it quite as much as Mr Navarro's first book, What Every Body is Saying. He definitely knows his stuff when it comes to behavioural analysis (as well he should, given his background), and I like the balance he brings to his interpretations and the way he focusses on the body language of comfort/discomfort, as compared to that of truth and deception. My one criticism would be that he makes some pre Very well written book on non-verbal communication in the workplace; although I possibly didn't enjoy it quite as much as Mr Navarro's first book, What Every Body is Saying. He definitely knows his stuff when it comes to behavioural analysis (as well he should, given his background), and I like the balance he brings to his interpretations and the way he focusses on the body language of comfort/discomfort, as compared to that of truth and deception. My one criticism would be that he makes some pretty sweeping statements about what is and isn't considered acceptable in a work setting in terms of both behaviours and dress... I think what he describes is probably valid in corporate or service industry America, but not necessarily outside it. The language and fashion rules he suggests abiding by would actually be out of place in most New Zealand businesses. Aside from that though, I thoroughly enjoyed this book, and look forward to reading more by this author.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    If you've read the author's other book "What Every BODY Is Saying," you'll find some repetition in the beginning of this book. This book is exactly what its title purport it to be - take your career from average to exceptional. Many of the observations that the author makes about businesses and individuals are obvious, like customers get upset when there's only one cashier to handle a long line and when another worker is called, the worker strolls to his station. Managers should be training thei If you've read the author's other book "What Every BODY Is Saying," you'll find some repetition in the beginning of this book. This book is exactly what its title purport it to be - take your career from average to exceptional. Many of the observations that the author makes about businesses and individuals are obvious, like customers get upset when there's only one cashier to handle a long line and when another worker is called, the worker strolls to his station. Managers should be training their workers to be more responsive to customers if they want to keep their business. I think this book is still worth reading. Even if there is only a few good suggestions that you would apply, practicing some good work habits would improve your performance.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Harry Roger Williams III

    On page 200 in a section that begins on page 199, “Address Emotions, But Don’t Indulge Them,” Navarro writes “Misery really does love company: excessive emoters distract others, focusing attention on themselves, as coworkers feel they must demonstrate empathy and solidarity. Work is disrupted, and others may even act on the beleaguered employee’s behalf to try to fix things. Not surprisingly, this further entrenches the behavior.” This kind of insight and wise counsel elevates this book far abov On page 200 in a section that begins on page 199, “Address Emotions, But Don’t Indulge Them,” Navarro writes “Misery really does love company: excessive emoters distract others, focusing attention on themselves, as coworkers feel they must demonstrate empathy and solidarity. Work is disrupted, and others may even act on the beleaguered employee’s behalf to try to fix things. Not surprisingly, this further entrenches the behavior.” This kind of insight and wise counsel elevates this book far above a mere guide to body language. I enjoyed this book a lot.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    This book is a great follow-up to "What Every Body is Saying", but don't read this one until you've read the first one. "Louder" builds on the ideas presented in the first book and applies them to a business setting (it's still very interesting, even if you're not reading it for business). I got the enhanced media version for the iBook reader, which included several videos from the author, which was well worth the extra cost. This book is a great follow-up to "What Every Body is Saying", but don't read this one until you've read the first one. "Louder" builds on the ideas presented in the first book and applies them to a business setting (it's still very interesting, even if you're not reading it for business). I got the enhanced media version for the iBook reader, which included several videos from the author, which was well worth the extra cost.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    Joe Navarro is one of the best known public experts on body language, so a book by him is a welcome event. This book works well for the general reader; it's not for the expert. But that's what the subtitle suggests; I'm not complaining, Joe! He begins with a general orientation -- body language is part of an entire milieu that creates an impression and affects our unconscious evaluation of another person. Say you meet someone in a business setting, for example. You might include in your judgment Joe Navarro is one of the best known public experts on body language, so a book by him is a welcome event. This book works well for the general reader; it's not for the expert. But that's what the subtitle suggests; I'm not complaining, Joe! He begins with a general orientation -- body language is part of an entire milieu that creates an impression and affects our unconscious evaluation of another person. Say you meet someone in a business setting, for example. You might include in your judgment of the person, the fanciness of the office, the size of the foyer, the art work on the walls -- all of that becomes part of the picture. Then Joe gets into the details, and here's where the going gets a little tricky. It's fine to recommend verbal mirroring in the discussion of establishing comfort and avoiding (or noticing) discomfort in the long process of building trust with co-workers, clients, and so on in the business world. And he's right to note the importance of establishing baseline behavior in observing body language, because one person's comfort level may be another person's cry for help. You can't assume, or read, strangers instantly without understanding their baseline behavior. In that context, then, intention cues are noticeable when they come from an emphasis on something outside of the baseline behavior. All the rest of it, the details of hands and feet, face and head, and the orientation of the body -- needs to be taken with a grain of salt, because of the variability from one person to another, one culture to another, and one generation to another. Joe's best insight comes back to his idea of comfort -- making other people feel comfortable so that they trust you, removing barriers to comfort, and noticing discomfort when it happens. Take that away from this book (and ignore the dated material about dress and offices and so on) and you can learn a good deal from this master negotiator.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Prince

    Joe Navarro is an ex-FBI agent expert at reading body language (aka non verbal communication or NVC) and has a couple of interesting talks on YouTube. Louder Than Words is his second book on the topic and is aimed at the corporate world. This is a well written book, but really, the material is stretched quite thin, and it's all over the place. Navarro makes two points that deserve mention. Firstly, unlike what you see in the movies, it would be a bad idea to use knowledge of NVC to detect when p Joe Navarro is an ex-FBI agent expert at reading body language (aka non verbal communication or NVC) and has a couple of interesting talks on YouTube. Louder Than Words is his second book on the topic and is aimed at the corporate world. This is a well written book, but really, the material is stretched quite thin, and it's all over the place. Navarro makes two points that deserve mention. Firstly, unlike what you see in the movies, it would be a bad idea to use knowledge of NVC to detect when people are lying or not entirely being truthful. People under stress, sickness and other phenomena may exhibit similar tics and you might end up in trouble unfairly accusing a colleague or your spouse of hiding things from you. Instead, Navarro advises the reader the use knowledge of NVC to broadly detect comfort and discomfort in people around you, and act according to what the occasion demands. This seems more reasonable to me, and one does not need to be Sherlock Holmes to do this. Final Verdict: A lot of this stuff is covered in his talks on YouTube, and you're better off watching them if the topic interests you.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Lisa

    I read this book for research but it made me think about work and how my non-verbals are interpreted there. I would have given this four stars, because it's full of useful and interesting information and helpful drawings, but the author completely forgets at times that women might be reading the book or that a different interpretation might need to be given to men and women making the same gestures. And when he does remember, well... some of his information is rather...lacking. For example, he te I read this book for research but it made me think about work and how my non-verbals are interpreted there. I would have given this four stars, because it's full of useful and interesting information and helpful drawings, but the author completely forgets at times that women might be reading the book or that a different interpretation might need to be given to men and women making the same gestures. And when he does remember, well... some of his information is rather...lacking. For example, he tells men what kind of suit they should wear, whether to keep it buttoned or not, and other specifics. For women he says "don't show too much flesh, professional men don't like it and neither do other women." (paraphrased). Yeesh! But if you want basic information about closed and open body postures, and a classification of gestures and postures on a comfort/discomfort binary (actually a useful categorization IMO) this is a good place to start.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bittu Davis

    What Every Body Is Saying by Joe Navarro is the first book I read on body language. It is a great book and I still refer it while I do my observation on people. Louder than words, is next step towards more in depth of body language. More and more into business levels and attaining good career growth by utilising the power of body language.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Allen He

    It is funny that this book has 1.5 chapters of 5 Star incredibly useful material yet all the other chapters are full of fillers and naive advice.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Giulia Magnanini

    absolutely to be read by anyone!!!!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Edwin mateo

    The best book on body language.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charmin

    HIGHLIGHTS: 1. Liars are usually troubled by three things: hearing a question they don’t like. Processing that question and coming up with a suitable answer, and answer the question (vocalizing). If they say that you have to decide NOW, then you definitely want to get out of there, because this is the tactic of a predator. 2. Discomfort displays let us know something is wrong, in real-time. Nonverbal intelligence in business is for eliciting useful information. Inquire, not accuse. It shows that HIGHLIGHTS: 1. Liars are usually troubled by three things: hearing a question they don’t like. Processing that question and coming up with a suitable answer, and answer the question (vocalizing). If they say that you have to decide NOW, then you definitely want to get out of there, because this is the tactic of a predator. 2. Discomfort displays let us know something is wrong, in real-time. Nonverbal intelligence in business is for eliciting useful information. Inquire, not accuse. It shows that details matter to you and that you are on top of things. You generate goodwill and promote openness, leading to better problem-solving. 3. Neatness, punctuality, preparation, attentiveness, and hard work are nonverbal behaviors that make unforgettable impressions in business settings. 4. To know how an individual exhibits discomfort, you must first observe how they behave when comfortable. 5. Situational Awareness: Etiquette is the art of making people feel comfortable. Being attentive to what is going on around you. 6. Address emotions, but don’t indulge them. Do not provide an audience, especially if this is repeated behavior. “I can see you are upset. I’m going to leave so you can get yourself under control and I’ll be back in five minutes.” Emotions are always in play in business. Those who recognize and address this fact will have an edge. 7. Meetings: People like to complain about meetings, but a properly run meeting can foster harmony and rapport. Should be held in a quiet place, with little distraction, and access to what you need to accomplish your goal. Anything that expedites the meeting. The role is to provide absolute attention. Whisperers and email checkers think they’re not being noticed, but for the head of the table or podium, all is visible. 8. Customer Service 8 Magic Words: “Good Morning (sir/madam). How may I help you?” Women are sensitive to space violation. Women feel more vulnerable when approached at angles. 9. Red-Flag: If he’s honest, he’ll be more than happy to answer them, in detail. It’s when someone shows discomfort in hearing or in answering your questions that you need to be concerned about. Your nonverbal radar should fire off a warning every time someone gives a less-than-emphatic answer. 10. It’s better to approach a woman directly, giving her a little more space, and to remain that way until she indicates otherwise non-verbally by rotating to angles as she begins to feel more comfortable.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Clark Hays

    Like a decoder ring for people The author, Joe Navarro, was an FBI profiler with a tremendous track record of spotting the various nonverbal cues that indicate someone is lying or concealing their true motives. He turns his talents to providing insights and strategies that can be used in day to day life. Specifically, the information he presents is useful for navigating the corporate world and making the most of interactions with co-workers and bosses. I learned a lot from it and, at least for th Like a decoder ring for people The author, Joe Navarro, was an FBI profiler with a tremendous track record of spotting the various nonverbal cues that indicate someone is lying or concealing their true motives. He turns his talents to providing insights and strategies that can be used in day to day life. Specifically, the information he presents is useful for navigating the corporate world and making the most of interactions with co-workers and bosses. I learned a lot from it and, at least for the first few weeks after reading it, tried to (over)interpret every twitch and flinch of everyone I saw and prescribe all kinds of bad motives to them. It's a quick read with lots of cases and examples, and pictures of all the various behaviors he talks about. This is an especially great book for writers because it captures the the way people move and react and interact.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Gregory

    Nice follow up book to the author's previous two titles. Some excellent pointers around base lining between comfort and discomfort parameters in those you are speaking with. I particularly enjoyed the discussion of "happy feet" telling us where others intentions are truly pointed. One other interesting piece is the positioning of the thumbs outside the pocket with the palm inserted into the pocket. Per Mr. Navarro this is usually indicative of someone who feels superior to you. I work in a hospit Nice follow up book to the author's previous two titles. Some excellent pointers around base lining between comfort and discomfort parameters in those you are speaking with. I particularly enjoyed the discussion of "happy feet" telling us where others intentions are truly pointed. One other interesting piece is the positioning of the thumbs outside the pocket with the palm inserted into the pocket. Per Mr. Navarro this is usually indicative of someone who feels superior to you. I work in a hospital around physicians and have zeroed in on this exact hand positioning several times in the past week. Nothing that I can do with it except smile and perhaps stroke that ego. Good, easy read that is well worth your time.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    Body language - whether we know it or not, we're sending our peers a message without even saying a word. That's what former federal agent Joe Navarro explains in this guide to nonverbal cues. The position of your feet, how you sit in your chair, and the small details in your choice of clothing speak volumes about you. While reading this book, I would go to work the next day and see if I could pick out any of the nonverbals Navarro writes about. And I am also conscious if I am displaying one of th Body language - whether we know it or not, we're sending our peers a message without even saying a word. That's what former federal agent Joe Navarro explains in this guide to nonverbal cues. The position of your feet, how you sit in your chair, and the small details in your choice of clothing speak volumes about you. While reading this book, I would go to work the next day and see if I could pick out any of the nonverbals Navarro writes about. And I am also conscious if I am displaying one of the nonverbals, such as turning my feet toward the door when I want a meeting to end. I've seen others display some of the signs of discomfort. I think ultimately, this book will help me better read people, and be able to handle tense situations more deftly. Interesting stuff.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nisrina Azizah

    I finished reading this book like months ago but did not have time to go on goodreads and write a review. I randomly found this book when walking around bookshelves in my university's library, the word FBI agent caught me and I then decided to borrow the book and read ( I am a sucker for spy stuffs, don't blame me) It turned out that I really enjoyed the book and had fun trying to practice what I read here in daily life. What really captivated me was when the writer told his one particular experien I finished reading this book like months ago but did not have time to go on goodreads and write a review. I randomly found this book when walking around bookshelves in my university's library, the word FBI agent caught me and I then decided to borrow the book and read ( I am a sucker for spy stuffs, don't blame me) It turned out that I really enjoyed the book and had fun trying to practice what I read here in daily life. What really captivated me was when the writer told his one particular experience when he made a mistake reading signs of someone whom he interrogated. He told us even when one is already experienced in this stuff, the possibility of making a mistake is still always there. You can never underestimate how complex human beings can be.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Zerafina Zara

    A must-read for anyone who wants to improve their business skills, client and personal relationships. This book seamlessly integrates what is missing from a lot of the literature on nonverbal communication. That is how your 'curb-side appeal' communicates something about your business. Everything from how the garden on the entrance of your business is tended, to the waiting room experience. Joe Navarro's earlier book, 'What Every Body is Saying' is great for the individual details of decoding no A must-read for anyone who wants to improve their business skills, client and personal relationships. This book seamlessly integrates what is missing from a lot of the literature on nonverbal communication. That is how your 'curb-side appeal' communicates something about your business. Everything from how the garden on the entrance of your business is tended, to the waiting room experience. Joe Navarro's earlier book, 'What Every Body is Saying' is great for the individual details of decoding nonverbals, but this book shows the immediate application to business relationships.

  22. 4 out of 5

    CS

    I like this book, although the first part is repeating the content of another book "What everybody is saying", which is about observing body language and micro expression, the second part is about how to put it to good use in work life. This is not about detecting deception, but rather be more sensitive to discovering discomfort among co-workers, business partners and customers. Nowing others' nonverbal language will give us a competitive edge when dealing with people. I like this book, although the first part is repeating the content of another book "What everybody is saying", which is about observing body language and micro expression, the second part is about how to put it to good use in work life. This is not about detecting deception, but rather be more sensitive to discovering discomfort among co-workers, business partners and customers. Nowing others' nonverbal language will give us a competitive edge when dealing with people.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Catherine

    While this book is intended to teach business audiences about how to control your own nonverbal communication and be sensitive to what others are communicating to ensure business success, the book has lots to offer the general reader. I found it really interesting and look forward to taking the insights it offers into the real world. I'd also recommend it to writers, as it's a great source for characterization. While this book is intended to teach business audiences about how to control your own nonverbal communication and be sensitive to what others are communicating to ensure business success, the book has lots to offer the general reader. I found it really interesting and look forward to taking the insights it offers into the real world. I'd also recommend it to writers, as it's a great source for characterization.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Meredith

    Solid, usable information with a nice twist on the usual "get an edge over everybody" message common in this genre. This is reflected in the author's parting words: "It is my hope that you will have a greater appreciation for nonverbal intelligence and use it as intended: to read, understand, assist and positively influence others." Solid, usable information with a nice twist on the usual "get an edge over everybody" message common in this genre. This is reflected in the author's parting words: "It is my hope that you will have a greater appreciation for nonverbal intelligence and use it as intended: to read, understand, assist and positively influence others."

  25. 5 out of 5

    Efi

    This is my first VOOK that I bought from iTunes. I watched the videos (one for each chapter) but I must say that it was not what I expected. It was about non verbal communication and mostly decoding body language. I was not happy for the money I spent. And since I don't have an iPad, I am not going to read the text on my iPhone hoping that it has more juice to it. So I won't rate this one This is my first VOOK that I bought from iTunes. I watched the videos (one for each chapter) but I must say that it was not what I expected. It was about non verbal communication and mostly decoding body language. I was not happy for the money I spent. And since I don't have an iPad, I am not going to read the text on my iPhone hoping that it has more juice to it. So I won't rate this one

  26. 4 out of 5

    Robert B

    “Take Your Career from Average to Exceptional with the Hidden Power of Nonverbal Intelligence.” Covers not just how to read nonverbal signals but also includes a good bit about being successful – dressing well, etc. His approach to nonverbal communication is rather sensible – focus on signs of comfort and discomfort.

  27. 5 out of 5

    William Murray

    I have Asperger's Syndrome and this book has pointed me in directions that for many might be commonsense, but isn't for me. Already some of the ideas presented have yielded positive results as I implement them. Topics are covered in detail and broken down by chapters. Highly recommended for others with Asperger's. I have Asperger's Syndrome and this book has pointed me in directions that for many might be commonsense, but isn't for me. Already some of the ideas presented have yielded positive results as I implement them. Topics are covered in detail and broken down by chapters. Highly recommended for others with Asperger's.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jack Vincent

    Body language is critical to understand. Be careful not to assume what people are thinking or what caused them to react a certain way. Always look for 2-3 types of body language in corroboration to get a solid feel for how they are feeling. Body language is Freeze, Flight, Fight; and all controlled by the lambic system so its authentic

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adam

    A few pointers I could use. Overall not special. Fairly basic observations. The author's picture on the back jacket cover is a lot of what he tells you not to do. Sneering type look I think was supposed to be tough and respectful came over to me as condescending. A few pointers I could use. Overall not special. Fairly basic observations. The author's picture on the back jacket cover is a lot of what he tells you not to do. Sneering type look I think was supposed to be tough and respectful came over to me as condescending.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Cheska

    Quick read, but contains very basic concepts. Author often refers to another book, "What Every Body Is Saying", which I think defeats the purpose of reading *this* book. Other than that, I did pick up some interesting tips and found myself enjoying observing other people! Quick read, but contains very basic concepts. Author often refers to another book, "What Every Body Is Saying", which I think defeats the purpose of reading *this* book. Other than that, I did pick up some interesting tips and found myself enjoying observing other people!

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