website statistics The Foucault Reader: An Introduction to Foucault's Thought - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

The Foucault Reader: An Introduction to Foucault's Thought

Availability: Ready to download

Michel Foucault was one of the most influential thinkers in the contemporary world, someone whose work has affected the teaching of half a dozen disciplines ranging from literary criticism to the history of criminology. But of his many books, not one offers a satisfactory introduction to the entire complex body of his work. The Foucault Reader was commissioned precisely to Michel Foucault was one of the most influential thinkers in the contemporary world, someone whose work has affected the teaching of half a dozen disciplines ranging from literary criticism to the history of criminology. But of his many books, not one offers a satisfactory introduction to the entire complex body of his work. The Foucault Reader was commissioned precisely to serve that purpose. The Reader contains selections from each area of Foucault's work as well as a wealth of previously unpublished writings, including important material written especially for this volume, the preface to the long-awaited second volume of The History of Sexuality, and interviews with Foucault himself, in the course of which he discussed his philosophy at first hand and with unprecedented candor. This philosophy comprises an astonishing intellectual enterprise: a minute and ongoing investigation of the nature of power in society. Foucault's analyses of this power as it manifests itself in society, schools, hospitals, factories, homes, families, and other forms of organized society are brought together in The Foucault Reader to create an overview of this theme and of the broad social and political vision that underlies it.


Compare

Michel Foucault was one of the most influential thinkers in the contemporary world, someone whose work has affected the teaching of half a dozen disciplines ranging from literary criticism to the history of criminology. But of his many books, not one offers a satisfactory introduction to the entire complex body of his work. The Foucault Reader was commissioned precisely to Michel Foucault was one of the most influential thinkers in the contemporary world, someone whose work has affected the teaching of half a dozen disciplines ranging from literary criticism to the history of criminology. But of his many books, not one offers a satisfactory introduction to the entire complex body of his work. The Foucault Reader was commissioned precisely to serve that purpose. The Reader contains selections from each area of Foucault's work as well as a wealth of previously unpublished writings, including important material written especially for this volume, the preface to the long-awaited second volume of The History of Sexuality, and interviews with Foucault himself, in the course of which he discussed his philosophy at first hand and with unprecedented candor. This philosophy comprises an astonishing intellectual enterprise: a minute and ongoing investigation of the nature of power in society. Foucault's analyses of this power as it manifests itself in society, schools, hospitals, factories, homes, families, and other forms of organized society are brought together in The Foucault Reader to create an overview of this theme and of the broad social and political vision that underlies it.

30 review for The Foucault Reader: An Introduction to Foucault's Thought

  1. 5 out of 5

    Peter Tieryas

    I like bald philosophers.

  2. 4 out of 5

    John

    Ahhhh....I don't know. This is not fun to read. I tried really really hard to understand all of it, and it gave me a headache. I was just concentrating SO HARD on the discursive regimes, is the thing. This is all just so lacking in everything...human. There is no humanity in Foucault's writing. Everything is language, and discourse, and knowledge and power created by and exercised through discourse. Nothing is real, nothing has continuity- there's no such thing as liberty, "the concept of libert Ahhhh....I don't know. This is not fun to read. I tried really really hard to understand all of it, and it gave me a headache. I was just concentrating SO HARD on the discursive regimes, is the thing. This is all just so lacking in everything...human. There is no humanity in Foucault's writing. Everything is language, and discourse, and knowledge and power created by and exercised through discourse. Nothing is real, nothing has continuity- there's no such thing as liberty, "the concept of liberty is 'an invention of the ruling classes' and not fundamental to man's nature." There's not even a stable conception of the human body. Historians can never hope to find anything even approaching objective truth because there is no such thing as truth, truth is produced by power and different societies have different "regimes of truth." Historians can't find the true origin of anything, or any continuity between present and past, only discontinuity and discord. You know, I decided to study history because I am interested in people. In the lives of people. I think I have some sort of fundamental disconnection with those scholars who are only interested in ideas and theory. Where were the people, I want to ask? What were they doing? Yes, yes, your conception of the penal system as some sort of inhumane panopticon of discursive control over bodies through examinations and surveillance is GREAT and all, but who were the PEOPLE in these prisons, for pete's sake. Give me a human connection to this story!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Max

    An excellent and far-reaching overview of Foucault's writings and thought. Foucault was an odd dude, and he came at questions from a different angle than most—but that different angle yields sometimes chilling, sometimes exciting, always fascinating material. From his analysis, it's not hard to begin seeing human society as a power exchange game—all culture as kink. Maybe it is. An excellent and far-reaching overview of Foucault's writings and thought. Foucault was an odd dude, and he came at questions from a different angle than most—but that different angle yields sometimes chilling, sometimes exciting, always fascinating material. From his analysis, it's not hard to begin seeing human society as a power exchange game—all culture as kink. Maybe it is.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    It's been a while since I read Discipline and Punish and Madness and Civilization, so I figured it was time for a refresher in Foucault's thinking. Reading this collection of excerpts from his books along with shorter articles and interviews, I'm amazed at how (am I really writing this about a french intellectual?) weirdly clear Foucualt's broader project was. This primer does an excellent job of pointing to the central tenants of his historical analysis about power, public health, incarceration It's been a while since I read Discipline and Punish and Madness and Civilization, so I figured it was time for a refresher in Foucault's thinking. Reading this collection of excerpts from his books along with shorter articles and interviews, I'm amazed at how (am I really writing this about a french intellectual?) weirdly clear Foucualt's broader project was. This primer does an excellent job of pointing to the central tenants of his historical analysis about power, public health, incarceration, repression and sexuality and still leaves room to explore each of these hugely important topics in his full books. And the interview sections offer a fascinating, deeply useful glimpse into his own consideration of his work. The only knock I have against it is that you might as well just sit down and read 2-3 of his books entirely, since they offer brilliant, often haunting observations about the development of institutional thinking in modern societies, observations that become even more powerful when presented in full length.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    This book is a good overview on Foucault's theories with regard to how we relate to power, how we relate to one another, and how we relate to ourselves. The earliest part of the book is about madness, and the later essays are about sex. The middle of the book, which excerpts a lot of material from Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, is about institutions of penality. In contrast to thinkers like Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, Jean-Paul Sartre, Gilles Deleuze / Felix Guatari, Foucault This book is a good overview on Foucault's theories with regard to how we relate to power, how we relate to one another, and how we relate to ourselves. The earliest part of the book is about madness, and the later essays are about sex. The middle of the book, which excerpts a lot of material from Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, is about institutions of penality. In contrast to thinkers like Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, Jean-Paul Sartre, Gilles Deleuze / Felix Guatari, Foucault is fairly straightforward in his argument and style--reading this book there was rarely a moment when I was unsure what Foucault was discussing. This is all right as an introduction to Foucault's thought mostly because of the length of the pieces--some of which are interviews, others of which are excerpted from longer works. However, as the the editor (Rabinow) points out, there is little in here from Foucault's work in the 1970s. Thus, there is no mention anywhere of the Foucauldian concept of the "episteme." On the other hand, with the inclusion of some of Foucault's earliest writings and his latest writings, the reader can see how the questions Foucault asked and the methods he employed to investigate them remained a constant through his career.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Khands

    The Foucault Reader is a compendium of Foucault's most important writings which are helpfully clarified in a series of interviews with the author. Foucault's philosophical position is at least in part deconstructionism. Discounting linear historical structures he champions the notion that an accumulation of genealogical information will lead to a more useful and accurate knowledge downplaying the mythification of the past so common today. Foucault brings into play a multiplicity of factors that d The Foucault Reader is a compendium of Foucault's most important writings which are helpfully clarified in a series of interviews with the author. Foucault's philosophical position is at least in part deconstructionism. Discounting linear historical structures he champions the notion that an accumulation of genealogical information will lead to a more useful and accurate knowledge downplaying the mythification of the past so common today. Foucault brings into play a multiplicity of factors that define the historical evolution of mores and attitudes. He explains how the truth of developing science infected and altered the mechanisms of power which along with developing Bourgeois morality and the economic need for workforce affected attitudes and behaviors concerning the individual, delinquency and sexuality. The depth and breadth of these changing attitudes is exemplified in the development of new architectural structures that support re-definition of the relation between mechanisms of power and the individual whether incarcerated in a penal facility, within educational structure or in the workplace. Foucault's overall intention seems to be to find the truth of how western man has come to find his intellectual and psychological roll in contemporary society. As with most philosophical writings Foucault requires thoughtful attention but this overview is a good starting point for those who wish to decipher his thinking.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jee Koh

    After encountering the critical thought of Nietzsche, I have wondered how to apply it to social and political problems. Foucault shows one way of doing so, through the genealogical analysis of power relations in society. From an interview in Power/Knowledge: The history which bears and determines us has the form of a war rather than that of a language: relations of power, not relations of meaning. History has no "meaning," though it is not to say that it is absurd or incoherent. On the contrary, i After encountering the critical thought of Nietzsche, I have wondered how to apply it to social and political problems. Foucault shows one way of doing so, through the genealogical analysis of power relations in society. From an interview in Power/Knowledge: The history which bears and determines us has the form of a war rather than that of a language: relations of power, not relations of meaning. History has no "meaning," though it is not to say that it is absurd or incoherent. On the contrary, it is intelligible and should be susceptible to analysis down to the smallest detail--but this in accordance with the intelligibility of struggles, of strategies and tactics.... What makes power hold good, what makes it accepted, is simply the fact that it doesn't only weigh on us as a force that says no, but that it traverses and produces things, it induces pleasure, forms knowledge, produces discourse.... From the essay "Nietzsche, Genealogy, History": Humanity does not gradually progress from combat to combat until it arrives at universal reciprocity, where the rule of law finally replaces warfare; humanity installs each of its violences in a system of rules and thus proceeds from domination to domination.... From Discipline and Punish: The perpetual penality that traverses all points and supervises every instant in the disciplinary institutions compares, differentiates, hierarchizes, homogenizes, excludes. In short, it normalizes.... Traditionally, power was what was seen, what was shown, and what was manifested and, paradoxically, found the principle of its force in the movement by which it deployed that force. Those on whom it was exercised could remain the shade; they received light only from that portion of power that was conceded to them, or from the reflection of it that for a moment they carried. Disciplinary power, on the other hand, is exercised through its invisibility; at the same time it imposes on those whom it subjects a principle of compulsory visibility. In discipline, it is the subjects who have to be seen.... The "Enlightenment,"which discovered the liberties, also invented the disciplines.... From an interview with Paul Rabinow, titled "Space, Knowledge and Power": Liberty is a practice.... The liberty of men is never assured by the institutions and laws that are intended to guarantee them. This is why almost all of these laws and institutions are quite capable of being turned around. Not because they are ambiguous, but simply because "liberty" is what must be exercised.... The guarantee of freedom is freedom.... From The History of Sexuality, Volume I: This new persecution of the peripheral sexualities entailed an incorporation of perversities and a new specification of individuals. As defined by the ancient civil or canonical codes, sodomy was a category of forbidden acts; their perpetrator was nothing more than the juridical subject of them. The nineteenth-century homosexual became a personage, a past, a case history, and a childhood, in addition to being a type of life, a life form, and a morphology, with an indiscreet anatomy and possibly a mysterious physiology. Nothing that went into his total composition was unaffected by his sexuality. It was everywhere present in him: at the foot of all his actions because it was their insidious and indefinitely active principle; written immodestly on his face and body because it was a secret that always gave itself away. It was consubstantial with him, less a habitual sin than as a singular nature. We must not forget that the psychological, psychiatric, medical category of homosexuality was constituted from the moment it was characterized--Westphal's famous article of 1870 on "contrary sexual sensations" can stand as its date of birth--less by a type of sexual relation than by a certain quality of sexual sensibility, a certain way of inverting the masculine and the feminine in oneself. Homosexuality appeared as one of the forms of sexuality when it was transposed from the practice of sodomy onto a kind of interior androgyny, a hermaphrodism of the soul. The sodomite had been a temporary aberration; the homosexual was now a species.... From Preface to The History of Sexuality, Volume II: But I reflected that, after all, it was best to sacrifice a definite program to a promising line of approach. I also reminded myself that it would probably not be worth the trouble of making books if they failed to teach the author something he hadn't known before, if they didn't lead to unforeseen places, and if they didn't disperse one toward a strange and new relation with himself. The pain and the pleasure of the book is to be an experience. From Michel Foucault: Beyond Structuralism and Hermeneutics: No! I'm not looking for an alternative; you can't find the solution of a problem in the solution of another problem raised at another moment by other people. You see, what I want to do is not the history of solutions, and that's the reason why I don't accept the word alternative. I would like to do the genealogy of problems, of problematiques. My point is not that everything is bad, but that everything is dangerous, which is not exactly the same as bad. If everything is dangerous, then we always have something to do. So my position leads not to apathy, but to a hyper- and pessimistic activism.... I think the ethico-political choice we have to make every day is to determine which is the main danger.... There were exercises in order to make one master of oneself. For Epictetus, you had to be able to look at a beautiful girl or a beautiful boy without having any desire for her or him. You have to become completely master of yourself. Sexual austerity in Greek society was a trend or movement, a philosophical movement coming from very cultivated people in order to give their live much more intensity, much more beauty. In a way, it's the same in the twentieth century when people, in order to get a more beautiful life, tried to get ride of all the sexual repression of their society, of their childhood. Gide in Greece would have been an austere philosopher.... I think that from the theoretical point of view, Sarre avoids the idea of the self as something which is given to us, but through the moral notion of authenticity, he turns back to the idea that we have to be ourselves--to be truly our true self. I think that the only acceptable practical consequence of what Sartre has said is to link his theoretical insight to the practice of creativity--and not of authenticity. From the idea that the self is not given to us, I think that there is only one practical consequence: we have to create ourselves as a work of art.... From an interview with Paul Rabinow in May, 1984, about polemics, politics, and problemizations: I like discussions, and when I am asked questions, I try to answer them. It's true that I don't like to get involved in polemics. If I open a book and see that the author is accusing an adversary of "infantile leftism," I shut it again right away. That's not my way of doing things. I don't belong to the world of people who do things that way. I insist on this difference as something essential: a whole morality is at stake, the morality that concerns the search for the truth and the relation to the other.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kevin J. Rogers

    I literally judged this book by its cover, picking it up while browsing around in a Waldenbooks shortly after college. I just thought the picture of Foucault on the cover was cool; it was a lucky break, because the book is an outstanding introduction to Foucault's thought and methodology, and I've been working through his ouevre ever since. I highly recommend this book as an introduction to this profound thinker's original and unique approach to doing philosophy. I literally judged this book by its cover, picking it up while browsing around in a Waldenbooks shortly after college. I just thought the picture of Foucault on the cover was cool; it was a lucky break, because the book is an outstanding introduction to Foucault's thought and methodology, and I've been working through his ouevre ever since. I highly recommend this book as an introduction to this profound thinker's original and unique approach to doing philosophy.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen

    Here's why this book fails, in my opinion: In order to understand Foucault, you have to read complete works. Choosing a couple of pages here and a couple of pages there does not work. The editor of this book (Rabinow) chose sections from multiple books, but these sections (in my view) don't cohere to offer any broad sketch of Foucault's thinking. However, there are some stand-alone essays in this book that are fantastic (What is an Author? What is Enlightenment?) as well as a good introduction by Here's why this book fails, in my opinion: In order to understand Foucault, you have to read complete works. Choosing a couple of pages here and a couple of pages there does not work. The editor of this book (Rabinow) chose sections from multiple books, but these sections (in my view) don't cohere to offer any broad sketch of Foucault's thinking. However, there are some stand-alone essays in this book that are fantastic (What is an Author? What is Enlightenment?) as well as a good introduction by the editor, but those few pages hardly justify spending money to purchase this book. I'd check it out from the library and photocopy those few pages.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lynda

    This is a good overview of Foucault's works. What struck me is how much of his work is influenced by the prejudices in his life and his support of marginalized groups. Trained in psychology, he is an example of the scientist whose work has moved into philosophy. This is a good overview of Foucault's works. What struck me is how much of his work is influenced by the prejudices in his life and his support of marginalized groups. Trained in psychology, he is an example of the scientist whose work has moved into philosophy.

  11. 5 out of 5

    T

    "The pain and pleasure of a book is to be an experience" Foucault "The pain and pleasure of a book is to be an experience" Foucault

  12. 4 out of 5

    Tarlach ÓMealláin

    Great overview of Foucault’s thought. IMO Where he gets most infesting is in regard to technologies of the self which is covered in the final portion of the book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Jahn

    Very interesting look at Power and Discipline. Foucault’s work develops a historical account of the different modes by which, in our culture, human beings are made subjects. Foucault’s interest is to present a genealogical account of the transition from the classical age to modern forms of power. The success of disciplinary power in the seventeenth and eighteenth century stemmed from a transition in methods. Visible acts of violence, such as public executions or torture, were rendered unnecessar Very interesting look at Power and Discipline. Foucault’s work develops a historical account of the different modes by which, in our culture, human beings are made subjects. Foucault’s interest is to present a genealogical account of the transition from the classical age to modern forms of power. The success of disciplinary power in the seventeenth and eighteenth century stemmed from a transition in methods. Visible acts of violence, such as public executions or torture, were rendered unnecessary with the rise of coercion. It is a bit dense, certain passages needed to be read more than once.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Haythem Bastawy

    I have not read Foucault before and The Foucault Reader has been an excellent introduction for me to the writings of the renowned philosopher. It contains large excerpts and chapters from many of his works, giving an insight into the nature of the work it has been taken from. For me the most relevant and the most interesting section is the one on the Enlightenment and modernity.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Neekta

    My brain hurt after each essay but that was mostly because it'd been totally blown to bits by brilliance. My brain hurt after each essay but that was mostly because it'd been totally blown to bits by brilliance.

  16. 4 out of 5

    John Wilson

    Foucault is a difficult writer because he is long-winded and takes ages to get to the point. This book will help a bit but I would read Understanding Foucault by Danaher et al. first.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Simon

    One of the earliest anthologies of Foucault (November, 1984), edited by U.C. Berkeley's Paul Rabinow, the volume contains representative selections from 'Madness and Civilization (1961,)' Discipline and Punish (1975),' and the 'The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1' (1976). Also included are the well-known essays, "What is an Author? (1969)" and "Nietzsche, Genealogy, History (1971)" as well as the preface to the second volume of 'The History of Sexuality' ('The Use of Pleasure,' 1984). Two late inte One of the earliest anthologies of Foucault (November, 1984), edited by U.C. Berkeley's Paul Rabinow, the volume contains representative selections from 'Madness and Civilization (1961,)' Discipline and Punish (1975),' and the 'The History of Sexuality, Vol. 1' (1976). Also included are the well-known essays, "What is an Author? (1969)" and "Nietzsche, Genealogy, History (1971)" as well as the preface to the second volume of 'The History of Sexuality' ('The Use of Pleasure,' 1984). Two late interviews on politics are also offered and one, "Polemics, Politics, and Problemizations (1984)," is as relevant now as it was when given. Foucault offers a harsh but accurate assessment of the polemicist: 'The polemicist... proceeds encased in privileges that he possesses in advance and will never agree to question . On principle, he possesses rights authorizing him to wage war and making that struggle a just undertaking; the person he confronts is not a partner in the search for the truth, but an adversary, an enemy who is wrong, who is harmful and whose very existence constitutes a threat. For him, then, the game does not consist of recognizing this person as a subject having the right to speak, but of abolishing him, as interlocutor, from any possible dialogue; and his final objective will be, not to come as close as possible to a difficult truth, but to bring about the triumph of the just cause he has been manifestly upholding from the beginning. The polemicist relies on a legitimacy that his adversary is by definition denied' (p. 382). He then offers this real-world example: 'Let us imagine, for a moment, that a magic wand is waved and one of the two adversaries in a polemic is given the ability to exercise all the power he likes over the other. One doesn't even have to imagine it: one has only to look at what happened during the debates in the USSR over linguistics or genetics not long ago. Were these merely aberrant deviations from what was supposed to be the correct discussion? Not at all: they were the real consequences of a polemic attitude whose effects ordinarily remain suspended' (p. 383). Rabinow's introduction is quite helpful and draws upon the famous 1971 Dutch television debate between Foucault and Noam Chomsky ("Human Nature: Justice versus Power") to delineate the distinctions between Foucault and more traditional critical approaches to culture and politics.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Liam

    I'm not a Foucault scholar by any means but I found this to be great collection of essays. This is by no means a hot take but Foucault really is a thoroughly thought provoking figure. Whether or not you find yourself agreeing with him the essays in this reader really do get you thinking in a very unique way. The essays at the beginning of this reader are some of his denser more theoretical works and likely off-putting to a lot of newer readers of Foucault or theory in general. These essays help I'm not a Foucault scholar by any means but I found this to be great collection of essays. This is by no means a hot take but Foucault really is a thoroughly thought provoking figure. Whether or not you find yourself agreeing with him the essays in this reader really do get you thinking in a very unique way. The essays at the beginning of this reader are some of his denser more theoretical works and likely off-putting to a lot of newer readers of Foucault or theory in general. These essays help inform the more theoretical grounding of his historical analysis but for people being introduced aren't essential to understanding what he's saying. The historical analysis that Foucault is known for largely comes after that first chapter and are a much easier to understand compared to those earlier essays. While I did read this for a class, it has inspired me to read some of his works in their entirety. I would highly recommend this to anyone wanting to get into Foucault's thought, far better than any other summation or 'Foucault explained' book you might find.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Matt Sautman

    While I have read many of the works included in this anthology before, I approach rating this anthology for the point of view of someone who has never read Foucault before at all. While there are some texts here that are generally new to me- “What is Enlightenment?,” “What is an Author?,” and the interviews, there are also plenty of Foucault’s other “greatest hits” in this collection like “Panopticism,” “Docile Bodies,” “The Birth of the Asylum,” and “We ‘Other Victorians.’ “Rabinow does an exce While I have read many of the works included in this anthology before, I approach rating this anthology for the point of view of someone who has never read Foucault before at all. While there are some texts here that are generally new to me- “What is Enlightenment?,” “What is an Author?,” and the interviews, there are also plenty of Foucault’s other “greatest hits” in this collection like “Panopticism,” “Docile Bodies,” “The Birth of the Asylum,” and “We ‘Other Victorians.’ “Rabinow does an excellent job presenting Foucault’s work as an intertextual enterprise, and I see plenty of value in using this text to introduce his major ideas.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jacob

    Good collection of essays. Not gonna act like I grasped all of it. The parts where he talks about “political anatomy” are especially interesting. And he talks about the body being a subject for political power to be expressed (in prisons especially) in ways I’ve never thought of. He definitely reaches a bit far at times though. Worth the read, Foucault is definitely well versed in the history of what he talks about.

  21. 4 out of 5

    tyler

    i found many of the essays and interviews, specfically, to be very interesting. the excerpts from books were kinda necessary to tie the "reader" together as a coherent work instead of amalgamation of disparate works. to be honest, the last couple interview sections kinda lost me. i think the first half was much better than the latter. HIGHLY looking forward to reading discipline & punish and also foucault's earlier "archeological" work since those seem more relevant to my current interests. i found many of the essays and interviews, specfically, to be very interesting. the excerpts from books were kinda necessary to tie the "reader" together as a coherent work instead of amalgamation of disparate works. to be honest, the last couple interview sections kinda lost me. i think the first half was much better than the latter. HIGHLY looking forward to reading discipline & punish and also foucault's earlier "archeological" work since those seem more relevant to my current interests.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gede Suprayoga

    This book helps me to understand the main works of Michel Foucault. Paul Rabinow synthesizes these works in a brief introduction, then he represents one or two chapters of the selected main works. This book also contains interviews which are useful to interrogate in depth some aspects of Foucault's thoughts. This book helps me to understand the main works of Michel Foucault. Paul Rabinow synthesizes these works in a brief introduction, then he represents one or two chapters of the selected main works. This book also contains interviews which are useful to interrogate in depth some aspects of Foucault's thoughts.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kathryn Poe

    I decided to use Foucault for my Senior thesis paper on Westworld and I quickly found that a lot of his ideas were useful. He’s also not wildly difficult to read compared to other philosophers. I thought he was easier to understand than most.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ali Amiri

    No wonder he is so influential today. Everybody regardless of their education or social status can find something in Foucault to apply to his everyday business and gain a drastically better understanding of how things REALLY work.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Adam Kanter

    I was confused about 50% of the time that I read this, but what I did understand seemed revolutionary and super illuminating (similar to reading Nietzsche). Found the work on discipline and punishment most aligned to my interests. His method of analysis is really interesting.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Vi

    Shout out to Rabinow for trying to help me make sense of Foucault

  27. 5 out of 5

    Elhaym Andreasson

    I agreed with most of what he said. It was pretty obvious stuff

  28. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    Everyone should read Foucault's thoughts on polemics. Everyone should read Foucault's thoughts on polemics.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Tim Bates

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Holy shit

  30. 5 out of 5

    Peter Harrison

    I'll write some further thoughts on this shortly, but in the meantime this is a fascinating selection from a wide range of work that gives you a real sense of Foucault's thought. I'll write some further thoughts on this shortly, but in the meantime this is a fascinating selection from a wide range of work that gives you a real sense of Foucault's thought.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.