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How are Christians to approach the central gospel teachings concerning the death and resurrection of Jesus? The Bible firmly establishes the historicity of these events and doesn't leave their meanings ambiguous or open to interpretation. Even so, there is an irony and surprising strangeness to the cross. Carson shows that this strange irony has deep implications for our l How are Christians to approach the central gospel teachings concerning the death and resurrection of Jesus? The Bible firmly establishes the historicity of these events and doesn't leave their meanings ambiguous or open to interpretation. Even so, there is an irony and surprising strangeness to the cross. Carson shows that this strange irony has deep implications for our lives as he examines the history and theology of Jesus's crucifixion and resurrection. Scandalous highlights important theological truths in accessible and applicable ways. Both amateur theologians and general readers will appreciate how Carson deftly preserves weighty theology while simultaneously noting the broader themes of Jesus' death and resurrection. Through exposition of five primary passages of Scripture, Carson helps us to more fully understand and appreciate the scandal of the cross.


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How are Christians to approach the central gospel teachings concerning the death and resurrection of Jesus? The Bible firmly establishes the historicity of these events and doesn't leave their meanings ambiguous or open to interpretation. Even so, there is an irony and surprising strangeness to the cross. Carson shows that this strange irony has deep implications for our l How are Christians to approach the central gospel teachings concerning the death and resurrection of Jesus? The Bible firmly establishes the historicity of these events and doesn't leave their meanings ambiguous or open to interpretation. Even so, there is an irony and surprising strangeness to the cross. Carson shows that this strange irony has deep implications for our lives as he examines the history and theology of Jesus's crucifixion and resurrection. Scandalous highlights important theological truths in accessible and applicable ways. Both amateur theologians and general readers will appreciate how Carson deftly preserves weighty theology while simultaneously noting the broader themes of Jesus' death and resurrection. Through exposition of five primary passages of Scripture, Carson helps us to more fully understand and appreciate the scandal of the cross.

30 review for Scandalous: The Cross and Resurrection of Jesus

  1. 4 out of 5

    Justinian the Great

    That was a great book, I will review it when I can.

  2. 5 out of 5

    John Gardner

    Based on a series of lectures D.A. Carson delivered at Seattle's Mars Hill Church in 2008, this book investigates five aspects of Christ's crucifixion and resurrection that are particularly scandalous. After all, the message of the cross is an offense ( Galatians 5:11 ). It is a stumbling block ( 1 Corinthians 1:23 ). It is folly to the weak and perishing... but it is also the power of God for those who are being saved ( 1 Corinthians 1:18 ). Too often we glaze over the real meaning of the Based on a series of lectures D.A. Carson delivered at Seattle's Mars Hill Church in 2008, this book investigates five aspects of Christ's crucifixion and resurrection that are particularly scandalous. After all, the message of the cross is an offense ( Galatians 5:11 ). It is a stumbling block ( 1 Corinthians 1:23 ). It is folly to the weak and perishing... but it is also the power of God for those who are being saved ( 1 Corinthians 1:18 ). Too often we glaze over the real meaning of the cross. We don't realize how truly scandalous it is, nor how wonderful it is for those who believe in Christ. Thankfully, Carson has given us this great book to teach us a familiar message in a fresh new way! The first chapter deals with four ironies of the cross: The Man Who Is Mocked as King Is the King; The Man Who Is Utterly Powerless Is Powerful; The Man Who Can't Save Himself Saves Others; and The Man Who Cries Out in Despair Trusts God. In each of these, Carson shows how there are multiple layers of irony in the text, and how understanding this irony "enables hearers and readers to see what is really going on. [It:] provides a dimension of depth and color that would otherwise be missing." In chapter two, Carson unpacks the passage which Martin Luther called "the center of the whole Bible": Romans 3:21-26 . This is a very useful exposition, as it clearly shows how God's justice and righteousness were displayed in the death of His Son, and how the old covenant Law was fulfilled in Jesus Christ, making way for the availability of an undeserved righteousness apart from the Law. Perhaps most helpful is the careful differentiation explained between the definitions of "propitiation" and "expiation". These are some weighty theological concepts made accessible in layman's terms. The third chapter deals with Satan's war against the offspring of the woman in Revelation 12. Carson shows how Christ's death and resurrection defeated Death and Satan, and gives us eschatological hope. In this life we will still have tribulation. Satan is violently waging war against God's people, because his time is short and he knows it. The cross gives us confidence that we have a share in Christ's ultimate victory over evil! Next, Carson turns his attention to the miraculous resurrection of Lazarus from the dead. There are many surprising elements to this miracle, particularly when seen in light of its context directly preceding Christ's Passion week. Each section of this book contains lots of great quote material, but this chapter may have the most. Here's one example: "Death is not normal when you look at it from the vantage point of what God created in the first place. It is normal this side of the fall, but that is not saying much. It is an enemy. It is ugly. It destroys relationships. It is to be feared. It is repulsive. There is something odious about death. Never ever pretend otherwise. But death does not have the last word." The final chapter is especially helpful in this age of skepticism, as Carson investigates the doubts of Thomas the Disciple. He looks at several various causes of doubt (present in both believers and nonbelievers), and how each cause requires different solutions. The tone is optimistic, as we see the conversion of Thomas' doubt into adoration, and discover that even the most hardened doubters still have the gift of salvation by grace through faith open to them. The message of the cross, when understood and accepted fully, truly changes everything. A relatively short book (176 pages) and written in a very conversational manner, Scandalous has the feel of a light-reading book even while covering very heavy material. Carson does an excellent job of maintaining the reader's interest throughout. I highly recommend this book to any believer, no matter how well-versed you may think you are in the cross. This is one message we can never hear too much!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    D.A. Carson is a master Bible scholar, but able to put things so clearly and succinctly for laypeople. I love how he points out the literary use of irony in Matthew. His exegesis of Romans 3:21-26 is worth the price of the book, and his treatment of the story of Lazarus is phenomenal. This book is a treasure, a combination of exegesis and rich devotional thoughts. A must read!

  4. 5 out of 5

    David Rathel

    D.A. Carson is one of my favorite theologians. This is a collection of his sermons on the crucifixion and resurrection of Christ. Carson spends a significant amount of time detailing the doctrine of penal substitution. An interesting and refreshing reminder of the heart of the Gospel and what Christ has done for us.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Rick Dobrowolski

    This was my second read through of the book, 7 years after I first read it. I always appreciate D. A. Carson’s cultural insights. He makes the passion week come alive.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jayant Singh Bisht

    In this book Carson exeget 5 biblical passages. 3 passages from the Gospel, one from Matthew and two from John. 1 from Revelation and last one from Romans. I love reading this book. This will unfold few myths about the passages Carson Exeget. To make it interesting for you, let me give you a taste of it, so that you can decide whether it is your cup of tea or not. In Romans 3:21. Carson agues Righteousness of God has been make known to us apart from the Law. That means the righteous demand of God In this book Carson exeget 5 biblical passages. 3 passages from the Gospel, one from Matthew and two from John. 1 from Revelation and last one from Romans. I love reading this book. This will unfold few myths about the passages Carson Exeget. To make it interesting for you, let me give you a taste of it, so that you can decide whether it is your cup of tea or not. In Romans 3:21. Carson agues Righteousness of God has been make known to us apart from the Law. That means the righteous demand of God is same as in the Old testament. But in Christ this righteousness is make known and given to us. Now you can read if this makes you interesting..

  7. 4 out of 5

    Andy Dollahite

    3.5 Stars The gospel is as glorious as 10,000 sunrises, so my rather vanilla reaction to this book has nothing to do with its principal subject. I just didn't find anything particularly "unique" in Carson's work. Others surely did, and thank God for that! It's competent and solid, but it wouldn't be the first laymen's book on the central theme of the bible I'd recommend. However, his chapter on John 11 was superb. 3.5 Stars The gospel is as glorious as 10,000 sunrises, so my rather vanilla reaction to this book has nothing to do with its principal subject. I just didn't find anything particularly "unique" in Carson's work. Others surely did, and thank God for that! It's competent and solid, but it wouldn't be the first laymen's book on the central theme of the bible I'd recommend. However, his chapter on John 11 was superb.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    D.A. Carson can preach. I was introduced to this preaching when he spoke at my church’s Bible conference a few years back on the person of Jesus Christ. I was blown away by Dr. Carson’s intellect, his ability to point out things in scripture I’d never seen before, his passion for Christ, and the witty, entertaining way in which he was able to do all of this. He simply made the Bible come alive to me in way I’d never experienced before. His new book, Scandalous: The Cross and Resurrection of Jesus, D.A. Carson can preach. I was introduced to this preaching when he spoke at my church’s Bible conference a few years back on the person of Jesus Christ. I was blown away by Dr. Carson’s intellect, his ability to point out things in scripture I’d never seen before, his passion for Christ, and the witty, entertaining way in which he was able to do all of this. He simply made the Bible come alive to me in way I’d never experienced before. His new book, Scandalous: The Cross and Resurrection of Jesus, did exactly the same thing. Carson examines 5 different texts from the Bible from Matthew 27, Romans 3, Revelation 12, John 11, and John 20. These are heavy passages, dealing with the crucifixion of Jesus, his raising of Lazarus from the dead, and the disciple Thomas’ doubting. The other passages tackle “the center of the whole Bible” (Romans 3), which connects the Old and New Testaments, as well John’s prophetic visions in Revelation. Difficult parts of the Bible to explain, to say the least, but Carson is able to plumb the depths of these theologically packed passages in such an insightful and concise way as to make them manageable and beautiful. The book is simply a feast for those who love to hear the Bible taught passionately and clearly. It’s hard to pick a favorite chapter as they were all fantastic, but I really enjoyed the discussion of the stories of Lazarus and Thomas. We’ve heard these stories so many times; it would be easy for them to feel familiar and less powerful than they should. Carson’s talent doesn’t allow for this response. He brings you right into the settings of the passages, and you feel like you’re watching the story unfold before you for the first time, seeing the actions of Jesus in completely new ways. I’ve yet to find many other authors who have this skill for making the scriptures so real to me. These 5 chapters were given as sermons at Mars Hill Church in Seattle back in December of 2008 as part of a Resurgence Conference. I was lucky enough to catch these sermons online. I don’t always enjoy reading a book after hearing the material preached live, but the writing in Scandalous makes you feel like you’re sitting there, talking personally to Dr. Carson as he explains and expounds upon the deep truths of scripture. He simply has a gift for exposition and it shines gloriously in this book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    Overall Carson takes us from understanding who Christ is, the importance of His atoning work on the cross, His triumph over Satan, His triumph over death and even His triumph over doubt. Each chapter is firmly grounded in Scripture and Carson does a good job of letting the reader know how it affects their life today. Carson doesn’t shy away from saying things that the intelligentsia of modern (liberal/emergent) Christianity think as scandalous or idiotic. Carson quotes a former atheistic philoso Overall Carson takes us from understanding who Christ is, the importance of His atoning work on the cross, His triumph over Satan, His triumph over death and even His triumph over doubt. Each chapter is firmly grounded in Scripture and Carson does a good job of letting the reader know how it affects their life today. Carson doesn’t shy away from saying things that the intelligentsia of modern (liberal/emergent) Christianity think as scandalous or idiotic. Carson quotes a former atheistic philosopher J. Budziszewski “When I fled from God…my way of fleeing was to get stupid. Though it always comes as a surprise to intellectuals, there are some forms of stupidity that one must be highly intelligent and educated to achieve.” Carson confronts head-on some of the modern (yet old) heresies surrounding the work of Christ on the cross – most of which seem to come from looking at the worlds problems primarily from a socio-economic vantage-point. “Have you noticed the categories we have used in this discussion of what ails the church in the west?” Carson asks (Page 78), “They are all sociological, historical, occasional, demographic, economic, psychological, medical. They are all performance-related, circumstance related. There is nothing about the Devil – and nothing about God.” And while Carson states that there is value to learning from such categories he insists that “if all of our analysis are restricted exclusively to such categories, the huge danger is that our solutions will be cast in such categories too.” If there is one thing that this book gets across it’s that the one solution — the primary need of mankind, the only solution that is permanent and without it all other solutions are temporary fixes at best — that man needs is that atoning work of Christ applied to his account, to appease the just wrath of a Holy God who is the one most offended by every sin we commit, the just judge, and the one who provides the gracious way of escape through Christ.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Adam Balshan

    4 stars [Theology] (W: 4, U: 4.25, T: 4.25) Exact rating: 4.17 #3 in its genre, out of 40 Carson's five chapters are basically short, expository papers or homilies of a few Bible passages. And while they are well done, they are not long enough to properly cover even all of the main nuances. It will come as a relief, however, to those who do not enjoy denser theology. Upon my second reading, almost 10 years after the first and with more exegetical work under my belt, I now realize he made some leaps i 4 stars [Theology] (W: 4, U: 4.25, T: 4.25) Exact rating: 4.17 #3 in its genre, out of 40 Carson's five chapters are basically short, expository papers or homilies of a few Bible passages. And while they are well done, they are not long enough to properly cover even all of the main nuances. It will come as a relief, however, to those who do not enjoy denser theology. Upon my second reading, almost 10 years after the first and with more exegetical work under my belt, I now realize he made some leaps in Chapter 3, on Revelation 12. And in Chapter 5, about the background of Thomas's knowledge of Jesus's deity, there was a notable omission. However, most of the truth ranges between "4" and "4.5," with two passages achieving a "5" (the purity of goodness in sacrifice, and its vestiges in Western culture on pp.30-31; and the contrast of grace and nihilism, relaying a story of J. Budziszewski on pp.46-47). This was a pleasure to read. Carson focuses on the irony/plot twists to which the cross and resurrection of Christ inhere. He deftly interweaves prescient biblical commentary, modern cultural application, and kind reproof into an exemplary work of theology with incisive writing and turns of phrase.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sally Ewan

    Excellent book! Carson is a great writer who explains ideas in a thorough, engaging, and interesting way. This book attempts to 'unpack' five Bible sections related to Christ's death and resurrection: Matthew 27, the crucifixion; Romans 3:21-26, Christ's atoning sacrifice; Revelation 12, Satan's rage against the Lamb; John 11, Lazarus' resurrection; and John 20, Thomas' response to the risen Christ. I would recommend this book specifically for the detailed explanation of Revelation 12's apocalyp Excellent book! Carson is a great writer who explains ideas in a thorough, engaging, and interesting way. This book attempts to 'unpack' five Bible sections related to Christ's death and resurrection: Matthew 27, the crucifixion; Romans 3:21-26, Christ's atoning sacrifice; Revelation 12, Satan's rage against the Lamb; John 11, Lazarus' resurrection; and John 20, Thomas' response to the risen Christ. I would recommend this book specifically for the detailed explanation of Revelation 12's apocalyptic vision. I've always puzzled over it, and I appreciate Carson's "'deeper analysis of the difficulties and sufferings of the church" and its teaching on how we are to be faithful.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

    This is a book of essays and talks, so it doesn't flow well. Carson uses the same illustration in two different chapters and twice details David's sin. Other than the flow problems, though, it's an excellent book. Would be good for most Christians to read, although people who prefer more academic texts might find it a little light. This is a book of essays and talks, so it doesn't flow well. Carson uses the same illustration in two different chapters and twice details David's sin. Other than the flow problems, though, it's an excellent book. Would be good for most Christians to read, although people who prefer more academic texts might find it a little light.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Excellent. Readings: June 2010 May 2016 (Read with LifeGroup)

  14. 4 out of 5

    Matt Mason

    In chapter after chapter Carson turns the gospel diamond before the reader. A wonderful read in the truest sense of the word.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brian Meadows

    This is a well-written book that is readable. I took my time and looked up Scripture references as I went and I would recommend that approach. D. A. Carson is a well-respected theologian and occasionally he takes a different but well-thought out perspectives on some things. I was particularly impressed with his perspective on the resurrection of Lazarus from the dead. I like it that Carson goes to great lengths to look at what the scripture says in light of the times and the culture in which the This is a well-written book that is readable. I took my time and looked up Scripture references as I went and I would recommend that approach. D. A. Carson is a well-respected theologian and occasionally he takes a different but well-thought out perspectives on some things. I was particularly impressed with his perspective on the resurrection of Lazarus from the dead. I like it that Carson goes to great lengths to look at what the scripture says in light of the times and the culture in which the events happened. He comes up with a slightly different view of what the gospel writer was conveying than popular current teaching does. He makes an excellent case for his interpretation. I'll leave it to you to read this book to discover what I am talking about for yourself!

  16. 5 out of 5

    James Kelley

    D. A. Carson, one of my favorite biblical authors and scholars, expounds the irony, scandal, and greatness of the work done on the cross. Carson shows that this strange irony has deep implications for our lives as he examines the history and theology of Jesus' crucifixion and resurrection. Scandalous is the part of the Re:Lit Series, which highlights important theological truths in accessible and applicable ways for theologians and general readers. Through exposition of five primary passages of D. A. Carson, one of my favorite biblical authors and scholars, expounds the irony, scandal, and greatness of the work done on the cross. Carson shows that this strange irony has deep implications for our lives as he examines the history and theology of Jesus' crucifixion and resurrection. Scandalous is the part of the Re:Lit Series, which highlights important theological truths in accessible and applicable ways for theologians and general readers. Through exposition of five primary passages of Scripture, Carson helps us more fully understand and appreciate the scandal of the cross.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Michele Morin

    One Weekend in Jerusalem Ash Wednesday is following hard on the heels of Groundhog’s Day this year, and while retailers are throwing heart and soul into Valentine’s Day, I find that my heart is more prepared to celebrate Easter if I spend some time during the Lenten season reading about the two historical events that are central to Christianity: the cross and the empty tomb. What happened? What does it all mean? This year, I have found Scandalous in which D.A.Carson isolates five theologically stu One Weekend in Jerusalem Ash Wednesday is following hard on the heels of Groundhog’s Day this year, and while retailers are throwing heart and soul into Valentine’s Day, I find that my heart is more prepared to celebrate Easter if I spend some time during the Lenten season reading about the two historical events that are central to Christianity: the cross and the empty tomb. What happened? What does it all mean? This year, I have found Scandalous in which D.A.Carson isolates five theologically stunning concepts based on five scriptural passages that integrate the implications of both crucifixion and resurrection: I. The Ironies of the Cross — Matthew 27:27-51 Irony, using words that normally mean the opposite of what is actually being said, brings situations into sharp focus, and there were four profound and dramatic ironies at work in the narrative of Jesus’ crucifixion. Living, as we do, after the resurrection, we are in a rich position to appreciate and to rejoice in the ironies as we read and reflect: •The Man who was mocked as king (robe, crown of thorns) was – and is – the King of kings. •The Man who was utterly powerless, holds all the power of heaven and earth. His weakness became the path to power over death and to the provision of a perfect Temple through becoming the perfect Sacrifice for the people of God. •The Man who “could not” save Himself, saved others. The mocking words of the chief priest, scribes, and elders were truer than they knew. •The Man who cried out in despair, trusted God. In fact, He was quoting Psalm 22 in His dying agony, and, once again, His persecutors spoke more wisdom than they realized. The torn curtain that opened access to the presence of God for humanity was the result of Jesus’ crushing experience of God’s absence. II. The Truth of Human Desperation — Romans 3:21-26 In our post-“I’m-O.K.-You’re-O.K” era, this may well be the most inexplicable of all Christian doctrines, for we are a tolerant generation in which “the one wrong thing to say is that somebody else is wrong.” However, the truth is that we are offenders before God and in need of reconciliation which Jesus provided, preserving the justice of God while justifying the ungodly. III. The Strange Triumph of a Slaughtered Lamb — Revelation 12 In this apocalyptic reenactment of the Christmas story, the Red Dragon rages over the truth that a deliverer has come forth from the Messianic community, and, therefore, his demise is certain. The past 2,000 years of martyrdom and persecution are the thrashing of the doomed dragon’s tail, while, in the meantime, the gospel advances through believers who are bearing witness to Christ, through the blood of the cross, and through the realization that life in Christ “is a call to die to self-interest,” (Revelation 12:11). IV. A Miracle Full of Surprises — John 11:1-53 The juxtaposition of death and life in Bethany reveals that God is always full of surprises. Jesus’ dealings with the dead man’s sisters is foreshadowed in His response to the disciples when He receives their summons: “This sickness will not end in death,” (11:4). The purpose of the miracle had nothing to do with death or even with life, but instead, God’s glory was put on display. Of course, this is not clear to anyone at the time, and it only becomes clear to us if we take a minute to realize that Jesus’ resurrection of Lazarus put Him in the crosshairs of those who were plotting to remove Him from the scene. I am constantly in need of reminders that I can trust God’s delays as much as I trust His action, and that the best consolation for my grief is to turn my attention to Christ. Jesus models a perfect response to grief, death and disappointment: tears and outrage. The final surprise in this miracle is the surrender of the Life-giver to death so that life may finally win. V. Doubting the Resurrection of Jesus — John 20:24-31 After an analysis of six forms of doubt, D.A. Carson enters into the cognitive dissonance that accompanied a crucified messiah. The fallout of that all-important weekend in Jerusalem, at least from the disciples’ viewpoint, was disappointment and despair. Therefore, the second Sunday after the resurrection, Thomas is still determined not to be taken in by rumors of a living Jesus. His utterance of faith, “My Lord and my God!” is part of the “these” that were written so that we who only read of Christ’s resurrection may also believe. Recalling this scene behind the locked doors of the upper room, poet Edward Shillito underscores the importance of the wounds that testified to Thomas: “If when the doors are shut, thou drawest near, Only reveal thy hands, that side of thine. We know today what wounds are, never fear: Show us thy wounds: we know the countersign. The other gods were strong, but thou wast weak. They rode, but thou didst stumble to thy throne. And to our wounds, only God’s wounds can speak — And not a god has wounds, but thou alone.” May the outcome of all our ponderings during this season of Lent be a stronger belief in the resurrection and a deeper following of our wounded God. This book was provided by Crossway in exchange for my review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

  18. 4 out of 5

    Philip Tadros

    Listened to this on audiobook. Carson is first scholar then pastor and it shows. While I enjoyed much of the book, I found it tedious at times and at times wondered how some of Carson's reflections relate to the title, namely that the cross and resurrection of Jesus are scandalous. At least the connection wasn't consistently clear. In my opinion, the first chapter of the book packs the most punch. Listened to this on audiobook. Carson is first scholar then pastor and it shows. While I enjoyed much of the book, I found it tedious at times and at times wondered how some of Carson's reflections relate to the title, namely that the cross and resurrection of Jesus are scandalous. At least the connection wasn't consistently clear. In my opinion, the first chapter of the book packs the most punch.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Reginald Detabali

    This book is a great help to know more of Christ. The scandalous realities of God's wrath and justice, forbearance and love are culminated in the cross of Calvary. The community of God will experience the satanic rage but the her life will be secured by Jesus' death and resurrection. Carson will have so many best insights and challenges with regard to our view of Christ's most overlooked prowess. A sinner saved by Grace is, without a doubt, going to love this book. This book is a great help to know more of Christ. The scandalous realities of God's wrath and justice, forbearance and love are culminated in the cross of Calvary. The community of God will experience the satanic rage but the her life will be secured by Jesus' death and resurrection. Carson will have so many best insights and challenges with regard to our view of Christ's most overlooked prowess. A sinner saved by Grace is, without a doubt, going to love this book.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Watson

    A very clear explanation of five passages of Scripture. Carson's language in this book (and probably most of his writing) is clear, accurate, and realistic. He reveals a deep understanding for the overall structure and message of Scripture as whole, as well as a close acquaintance with the historical and cultural milieu in which it was written. Meditating on these five passages alongside Carson is a faith-strengthening activity focused on the very center of the Faith. A very clear explanation of five passages of Scripture. Carson's language in this book (and probably most of his writing) is clear, accurate, and realistic. He reveals a deep understanding for the overall structure and message of Scripture as whole, as well as a close acquaintance with the historical and cultural milieu in which it was written. Meditating on these five passages alongside Carson is a faith-strengthening activity focused on the very center of the Faith.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    This book is really hard to review because for the most part I really liked it but I do have some different beliefs about Revelation 12. Overall I believe it is a great read and I recommend it. I think it is good for me to learn how other people think. My favorite section of the book was his teaching about the raising of Lazarus. The outrage over sin and death that Jesus experienced was very moving for me.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Matthew

    A wonderful book for Holy Week This is a wonderful book to read during Holy Week. Carson has always been one who sticks closely to the Scriptures but provides insights that make the Scriptures come alive. This was so good, and I cannot recommend it more highly.

  23. 5 out of 5

    David Gifford

    This was an excellent read. It treads familiar ground, but does so slowly so that nuances are picked up upon. The first chapter, is to me, the most striking. Given his eschatology, I didn't favor chapter 3, however there is still plenty of insight there. I recommend it! This was an excellent read. It treads familiar ground, but does so slowly so that nuances are picked up upon. The first chapter, is to me, the most striking. Given his eschatology, I didn't favor chapter 3, however there is still plenty of insight there. I recommend it!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kian.ting

    This is a good book explains what Grace is, which is central to Christian belief.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Justin Howe

    So good! Carson helps you to gaze anew at the wonder that God became a man, that He died our death, and that we can be justified!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Suzanne Noakes

    One for your resource collection Get this book. You can't beat a pastor who is an eloquent theologian and yet retains his grasp on practical theological application. One for your resource collection Get this book. You can't beat a pastor who is an eloquent theologian and yet retains his grasp on practical theological application.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jason Kolar

    D.A. Carson is the man. This is a Great book to get your eyes set on something truly scandalous.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Josiah

    Surprisingly easy to read and digest. Big ideas put simply. Loved this book!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Vintage Carson. Exposits several passages detailing the crucifixion and resurrection of our Lord.

  30. 5 out of 5

    C.J. Scott

    An excellent succinct volume from DA Carson, he uses his fresh and direct style to illuminate the tried and tested truth concerning the death and resurrection of Jesus. I love the opening chapter about the irony of the ironies.

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