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Little Red Book of Selling: 12.5 Principles of Sales Greatness

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Editorial Reviews From Publishers Weekly If salespeople are worried about how to sell, Gitomer (The Sales Bible) believes they are missing out on the more important aspect of sales: why people buy. This, he says, is "all that matters," and his latest book aims to demystify buying principles for salespeople. From the red cloth cover to the small trim size to the amusing (bu Editorial Reviews From Publishers Weekly If salespeople are worried about how to sell, Gitomer (The Sales Bible) believes they are missing out on the more important aspect of sales: why people buy. This, he says, is "all that matters," and his latest book aims to demystify buying principles for salespeople. From the red cloth cover to the small trim size to the amusing (but not cloying) cartoons on almost every page, this is an appealing and accessible book. The author is obviously enthusiastic, if not manic, about sales, and though some of his mantras verge on hokey, much of his prose is straightforward and realistic. Each chapter includes a mini table of contents, pull quotes and takeaway sound bites, examples of typical whines from salespeople (e.g., "the client said they spent their whole budget") paired with a positive response (e.g., "Decision makers make the budget. Non-decision makers spend the budget"), and plenty of advice and ideas that can be taken in and studied as a whole or referred to at random for inspiration. Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Review This isn't just a red book; it's a Red Bull of high-energy sales tips & counsel. -- David Dorsey, The Wall Street Journal (May 3rd 2006) See all Editorial Reviews -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Product Details Hardcover: 220 pages Publisher: Bard Press; 1st edition (September 25, 2004) Language: English ISBN-10: 1885167601 ISBN-13: 978-1885167606 Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.2 x 0.7 inches Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces


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Editorial Reviews From Publishers Weekly If salespeople are worried about how to sell, Gitomer (The Sales Bible) believes they are missing out on the more important aspect of sales: why people buy. This, he says, is "all that matters," and his latest book aims to demystify buying principles for salespeople. From the red cloth cover to the small trim size to the amusing (bu Editorial Reviews From Publishers Weekly If salespeople are worried about how to sell, Gitomer (The Sales Bible) believes they are missing out on the more important aspect of sales: why people buy. This, he says, is "all that matters," and his latest book aims to demystify buying principles for salespeople. From the red cloth cover to the small trim size to the amusing (but not cloying) cartoons on almost every page, this is an appealing and accessible book. The author is obviously enthusiastic, if not manic, about sales, and though some of his mantras verge on hokey, much of his prose is straightforward and realistic. Each chapter includes a mini table of contents, pull quotes and takeaway sound bites, examples of typical whines from salespeople (e.g., "the client said they spent their whole budget") paired with a positive response (e.g., "Decision makers make the budget. Non-decision makers spend the budget"), and plenty of advice and ideas that can be taken in and studied as a whole or referred to at random for inspiration. Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Review This isn't just a red book; it's a Red Bull of high-energy sales tips & counsel. -- David Dorsey, The Wall Street Journal (May 3rd 2006) See all Editorial Reviews -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Product Details Hardcover: 220 pages Publisher: Bard Press; 1st edition (September 25, 2004) Language: English ISBN-10: 1885167601 ISBN-13: 978-1885167606 Product Dimensions: 7.6 x 5.2 x 0.7 inches Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces

30 review for Little Red Book of Selling: 12.5 Principles of Sales Greatness

  1. 5 out of 5

    Gil Bradshaw

    I was so embarrassed at how hokey this book was that I almost didn't include it in my goodreads reviews. Then I decided to do so, just to blast it. I'm so sick of good salesman writing really poorly written books. Maybe I'm not the right guy for books such as this, but its just unprofessional. I'm trying to think of the demographic that Gitomer was trying to target with his gimmicky salesy approaches...Amway salesman? Multi-level Marketing salesman? I hope I can get more than a buck for this whe I was so embarrassed at how hokey this book was that I almost didn't include it in my goodreads reviews. Then I decided to do so, just to blast it. I'm so sick of good salesman writing really poorly written books. Maybe I'm not the right guy for books such as this, but its just unprofessional. I'm trying to think of the demographic that Gitomer was trying to target with his gimmicky salesy approaches...Amway salesman? Multi-level Marketing salesman? I hope I can get more than a buck for this when I resell it on amazon.com

  2. 5 out of 5

    Glen Babington

    The little Red Book of Selling- Jeffrey Gitomer Www.gitomer.com Difference between failure and success in the sales: • Believe you can • Create the environment • Have the right associations • Expose yourself to what's new • Plan for the day -know your plans and goals • Become valuable - become known as a resource not a sales person • Flowe the answers your prospects and customers need • Recognize and take advantage of opportunity • Take responsibility • Take action • Make mistakes • willing to ri The little Red Book of Selling- Jeffrey Gitomer Www.gitomer.com Difference between failure and success in the sales: • Believe you can • Create the environment • Have the right associations • Expose yourself to what's new • Plan for the day -know your plans and goals • Become valuable - become known as a resource not a sales person • Flowe the answers your prospects and customers need • Recognize and take advantage of opportunity • Take responsibility • Take action • Make mistakes • willing to risk • Keep your eyes on the prize • Balance yourself • Invest (in yourself) don't spend • Stickat it until you win • Develop and maintain a positive attitude • Ignore zealots and idiots 12 Principles of sales greatness 1. Be focused with the right philosophy and attitude • p.41 how to come out of a slump 2. Prepare to win • Do your home work • P. 48 how to research your prospect 3. Build your personal brand - It's Not who you know but who knows you • P.57 how to improve personal branding • Become known as a person of action 4. Focus or value and relationship, not price • P. 66 principles of giving value and being valuable • P. 72 what your customers want • Put yourself in front of people uho can say yes and delver value first • Make friends and out professionally 5. The Importance of networks • To network successfully: a great 30 second commercial; your willingness to dedicate the time; a plan of where and when • P.86 the 21 best places to network • Secrets: get respected by those that count ; Use liesure Zones ; be aware at who is around you 6. Must get in front of the decision maker • Create compelling reasons • Sell the appointment not the product or service 7. Engage prospect with power questions- designed to make your prospect think about himself and answer in terms of what you are selling or doing • P. 116 for power question lead-ins • 8. If you can make them laugh, you can make them buy • Pick something that's personal to you • P. 127 Some Safe topics 9. Use creativity to differentiate and dominate • Elements that drUe your creativity • Brains • Altitude • Habit of observing • Habit of collecting ideas • Your self belief • Support system • Creative environment • Creative mentors and associations • Study creativity Edward De Bono - best book "Tinkertoys' by Michael Michalko • Study history of creativity in your industry • Use creative models -see books Six Thinking Hats or Six action Shoes or the SCAMPER model: Substitute, Combine, Adapt, Modify, Maxi rie/ Minimise, put to other use, reverse or Rearrange • Risk failure. • Three areas to make a difference • Open Sales Call with a Smart question • Change your ordinary imaging and branding • Use your follow-up and "stayin front' power to tire max- tharh you notes -weekly email 10 . Reduce their risk and you'll Convert selling to buying • Risk from buyers perspective: • afforaability • Need • Possibility Of cheaper substitute • Not what originally thought of • Product performance • Quality • Looking foolish / people getting mad 11. Power of Testimonials Ask a customer to tell you their reasons from purchasing from you and you will get more sales ot that type, ie uncover the buying motive 12. Using your sense of selling 6 positive Sales senses: • Confidence • PositNe antici pal'ion • Determination • Achievemint • Winning • Success Negative senses which are mental blockers: • Fear • Nervousness • Rejection • Procrastination or reluctance • Justification / rationale • Self-doubt • unlucky Be focused about what and who is around you 13. Red formulas For self development • Belief system • Passion from your belief • Altitude of YES • Invest time in things that help you succeed • Begin capturing your thoughts, strategies and ideas in writing • Take a course in writing • Take a course in something you love • Begin clarifying your ideas in public • Publish something Elements that make you strong enough to mike a Sale: • Image • Ability to speak • Abili try to establish rapport • Attitude • Product knowledge • Desire to help • Preparedness • Humour • Creativity • Reputation • Glue- how you hold it all together

  3. 4 out of 5

    Loy Machedo

    Loy Machedo’s Book Review Little Red Book of Selling by Jeffrey Gitomer If you are going to ask me to evaluate Jeffrey Gitomer, let me tell you point blank the review will not be fair. Why? I worship the ground on which Jeffrey Gitomer walks. In my eyes, he is truly the essence of what a true trainer, educator and mentor should be. Not only is he to the point, he bashes you up with not-so-formal quotes that would wake you up from your sleep and then slap you with the reality of what the art of sale Loy Machedo’s Book Review Little Red Book of Selling by Jeffrey Gitomer If you are going to ask me to evaluate Jeffrey Gitomer, let me tell you point blank the review will not be fair. Why? I worship the ground on which Jeffrey Gitomer walks. In my eyes, he is truly the essence of what a true trainer, educator and mentor should be. Not only is he to the point, he bashes you up with not-so-formal quotes that would wake you up from your sleep and then slap you with the reality of what the art of sales in all about. So let me not flatter, flutter and flitter around praising him as it would not benefit anyone and get to the point of the book review. Pros 1. Easy to read 2. Easy to understand 3. Easy to implement (though difficult to be consistent unless you are the best) 4. Information to the point 5. Visually – a stand out 6. Creative 7. Funny 8. No bullshit 9. Tried and test advice 10. Universal application 11. Very thought provoking 12. 219 pages of advice in gold (no make that platinum) 13. Hardbound book 14. Heavy weight 15. Great paper material 16. Excellent design 17. Has a Red book marker 18. Book that can serve as a gift to anyone 19. Book that you can give your sales team 20. Book you can hit the idiots in your office with Cons 1. Plenty of ‘To-Do’ stuff which involves going to his website repeatedly. He also has the 12.5 principles for Sales Success • Principle 1: Kick Your Own Ass. • Principle 2: Prepare to Win, or Lose To Someone Who Is • Principle 3: Personal Branding is Sales, Its Not You Know, Its Who Knows You. • Principle 4: Its All About Value, It’s All About Relationship, Its Not All About Price. • Principle 5: Its Not Work, Its NETWork. • Principles 6: It You Cant Get In Front of the Real Decision Make, You Suck • Principle 7: Engage Me and You Can Make Me Convince Myself • Principle 8: If You Can Make Them Laugh, You Can Make Them Buy! • Principle 9: Use Creativity To Differentiate and Dominate • Principle 10: Reduce Their Risk, And You’ll Covert Selling To Buying • Principle 11: When You Say It About Yourself It’s Bragging. When Someone Else Says It About You, Its Proof. • Principle 12: Antennas Up! • Principle 12.5: Resign your position as general manager of the universe. And yes, he also states the basic fundamentals: 1. Believe you can. 2. Create the environment. 3. Have the right associations. 4. Exposure yourself to what’s new. 5. Plan for the day. 6. Become valuable. 7. Have the answers your prospects and customers need. 8. Recognize opportunity. 9. Take advantage of opportunity. 10. Take responsibility. 11. Take action. 12. Make mistakes. 13. Willing to risk. 14. Keep your eyes on the prize. 15. Balance yourself. 16. Invest, don’t spend. 17. Stick at it until you win. 18. Develop and maintain a positive attitude. 19. Ignore idiots and zealots. Overall Review Do I recommend this book Hell yeah! Any product of Jeffrey Gitomer is a dream come true. For someone like me who dreamt of purchasing his book years ago this is a gift of a lifetime. Overall Ratings If there was anything like 11 out of 10, this is one book which would receive that award. Perfect score! Loy Machedo's Extra Tip: Go to http://www.gitomer.com/ and get yourself a couple of freebies!!!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Kali

    I disliked Jeffrey Gitomer's book 12.5 Principles of Sales Greatness. The content itself is solid. Gitomer's advice is very good but his delivery leaves much to be desired. I have a hard time believing that the word "puke" comes out of the mouths of most professional business people. Gitomer also has quite a large ego and takes every opportunity to brag about his life. Many self help authors use stories in their own lives to tell stories, but I have never rolled my eyes while reading a book. It I disliked Jeffrey Gitomer's book 12.5 Principles of Sales Greatness. The content itself is solid. Gitomer's advice is very good but his delivery leaves much to be desired. I have a hard time believing that the word "puke" comes out of the mouths of most professional business people. Gitomer also has quite a large ego and takes every opportunity to brag about his life. Many self help authors use stories in their own lives to tell stories, but I have never rolled my eyes while reading a book. It was just that stupid. Gitomer should work on his professional appearance in case the world realizes what a tool he is.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Sure, this guy has sold more stuff than I have. But I don't find anything here backed up by any evidence, what there is is anecdotal. Also he keeps hinting that you have to go to his webpage to learn more. Ah ha, trying to make that web sale I guess. In all, I think he knows how to sell (books too), but he doesn't know how to educate. Sure, this guy has sold more stuff than I have. But I don't find anything here backed up by any evidence, what there is is anecdotal. Also he keeps hinting that you have to go to his webpage to learn more. Ah ha, trying to make that web sale I guess. In all, I think he knows how to sell (books too), but he doesn't know how to educate.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ron Graham

    This isn't just a book one reads. It's a book one carries around as a reference, like a dictionary. Especially if you're like me, learning the art of sales in the second half of my life - had I been smart, I would've learned how to sell while I was in college. Because in this society, in this economy, everyone's selling. Those of us who can't or won't figure out how will lag behind. This is the kind of information that can get even a guy like me selling. This isn't just a book one reads. It's a book one carries around as a reference, like a dictionary. Especially if you're like me, learning the art of sales in the second half of my life - had I been smart, I would've learned how to sell while I was in college. Because in this society, in this economy, everyone's selling. Those of us who can't or won't figure out how will lag behind. This is the kind of information that can get even a guy like me selling.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Kempenich

    Awesome, even for someone not in selling. If you haven't realized yet, you are probably in sales, whether your job title says it or not. If you are a doctor you sell a certain prescription, if you are a teacher you sell a subject, if you meet someone new you sell yourself. That is why you should read this book. Awesome, even for someone not in selling. If you haven't realized yet, you are probably in sales, whether your job title says it or not. If you are a doctor you sell a certain prescription, if you are a teacher you sell a subject, if you meet someone new you sell yourself. That is why you should read this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gregory

    does everything have to have a 0.5 step? give me a top 10 not 10.5 on every single list. very annoying. good information poorly written. I'm shocked that he has a news column...could explain the death of newspapers. very abbrassive attitude. this man clearly works his life away and doesn't know how to have a work life balance. does everything have to have a 0.5 step? give me a top 10 not 10.5 on every single list. very annoying. good information poorly written. I'm shocked that he has a news column...could explain the death of newspapers. very abbrassive attitude. this man clearly works his life away and doesn't know how to have a work life balance.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Michael Cash

    I hated this book. Hated it. Like Roger Ebert hated North: "I hated this movie. Hated hated hated hated hated this movie. Hated it. Hated every simpering stupid vacant audience-insulting moment of it. Hated the sensibility that thought anyone would like it. Hated the implied insult to the audience by its belief that anyone would be entertained by it." I guess I could say one good thing about it: by listening to the unabridged audio of the book, read by the author, I feel that I got to know him. A I hated this book. Hated it. Like Roger Ebert hated North: "I hated this movie. Hated hated hated hated hated this movie. Hated it. Hated every simpering stupid vacant audience-insulting moment of it. Hated the sensibility that thought anyone would like it. Hated the implied insult to the audience by its belief that anyone would be entertained by it." I guess I could say one good thing about it: by listening to the unabridged audio of the book, read by the author, I feel that I got to know him. And he's a jerk. A few tips for the next edition, Jeffrey: 1) Remove all profanity. It isn't the language of business. 2) Don't use your book as an ad for selling me your other books and your website content every page or so. If the content was that good and that indispensable, you should have included it here instead of mentioning it here and telling me where to go get it. 3) Don't encourage dishonest ways to sell. 4) Don't focus only on business-to-business sales made by cold calling and going out on appointments to make presentations. 5) Update the book. I can't believe that it was even current in 2005 when it came out, since some of your big advice centers on buying a laptop computer and listening to tapes in the car. 6) Rename the book. It has more to do with keeping a positive attitude than any sales skills. 7) Spend more time telling me what to do, rather than telling me what not to do. 8) Lose the .5 on everything. Really, really irritating after about the first chapter. 8.5) Don't mock your customers/students/readers.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Ehsas

    First of all why 12.5. Why not 12? Why not 13? This should have been a red flag to avoid the book. OK. This is another one of those books where everyone swears by it, is recommended by your waiter, hairdresser and the annoying co-worker. It makes most must-read lists, yet its reputation precedes it (not in a good way). The author sounds angry and condescending. On some pages I could imagine the author all red-faced, punching on the keyboard and screaming his lungs out. Jesus. Buddy, take it easy. First of all why 12.5. Why not 12? Why not 13? This should have been a red flag to avoid the book. OK. This is another one of those books where everyone swears by it, is recommended by your waiter, hairdresser and the annoying co-worker. It makes most must-read lists, yet its reputation precedes it (not in a good way). The author sounds angry and condescending. On some pages I could imagine the author all red-faced, punching on the keyboard and screaming his lungs out. Jesus. Buddy, take it easy. Calm down. Drink a sip of water. It's OK. We get it. You think are smart and everyone else, especially those who purchased your book, must be idiots. Now on to the content of the book. Granted that the book has some valuable info for the extremely fresh salesman, the one who is leaving home for the first time and experiencing the world. But for everyone else, most of the stuff is common sense. Nothing magical or ground breaking. Also the book reads like a giant PowerPoint presentation. Except where the presenter is an angry, snobbish asshole. Save your time and money by avoiding this book.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    After reading some of the other reviews here on Goodreads, I noticed that many either love or hate this book. I guess, that is true in most areas of life. As for me, I really enjoyed this book. I found it on sale at a local used book store and couldn't resist purchasing it. I am truly glad that I read through it. I do feel that I will keep it on my shelf and pick up from time to time for years to come. The style of writing was very conversational and truly motivated me to learn more and pursue s After reading some of the other reviews here on Goodreads, I noticed that many either love or hate this book. I guess, that is true in most areas of life. As for me, I really enjoyed this book. I found it on sale at a local used book store and couldn't resist purchasing it. I am truly glad that I read through it. I do feel that I will keep it on my shelf and pick up from time to time for years to come. The style of writing was very conversational and truly motivated me to learn more and pursue success. I think that this book could benefit salesmen and non-salesmen alike. Basically, anyone who deals with people can benefit from reading through it. But it is definitely intended for salesmen.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brandi

    This book has some okay tips on networking and risk management. However, the language can be somewhat unprofessional at times. It also completely dismisses support staff, which can be a huge mistake in sales. It's also a very self-congratulatory text. The author thinks highly of himself, I get it. He should reconsider his own advice on arrogance. This book has some okay tips on networking and risk management. However, the language can be somewhat unprofessional at times. It also completely dismisses support staff, which can be a huge mistake in sales. It's also a very self-congratulatory text. The author thinks highly of himself, I get it. He should reconsider his own advice on arrogance.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Allyson Stallman

    A lot used car salesman, little academic and empirical backing. More of a Little Red Book of Jeff Gitomer.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Linda Faulkner

    Excellent - this is a MUST-read for all business people.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Rihab Harmessi

    Excellent book. Principles of Sales and meeting is the objective is no different from reaching life purpose or setting goals and achieving them. It is simple, if you have what it takes to be successful at convincing, negociating and sellling. Then you simply have it! the necessary skills to meet your goals.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Zachary Wrightsman

    For sure a good book a lot of good information in it. I learned a lot for my first read through. It is most definitely a book you will need to read over and over unless you’re already a master sales person.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Francisco Ramires

    Jeffrey Gitomer promised a lot. I did not find a lot more than in a general sales-related website available to the public. Besides, most of the recommendations and approaches lack evidence or practical examples. If you're looking for a real sales book get a copy of "Never split the difference", or even "Blink" for a more detailed description of the scientific-side of how humans respond to different triggers. Jeffrey Gitomer promised a lot. I did not find a lot more than in a general sales-related website available to the public. Besides, most of the recommendations and approaches lack evidence or practical examples. If you're looking for a real sales book get a copy of "Never split the difference", or even "Blink" for a more detailed description of the scientific-side of how humans respond to different triggers.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Teri Temme

    Second time around - it always gets better!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Anna Marie Robertson

    Entertaining.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Erdem

    I am a bit confused about how to rate this book. If you are in car sales, it’s 4-5 stars. If you are in any kind of complex sales, it’s at most 2 stars.

  21. 5 out of 5

    sarah semark

    I loathed this book so much it took me nearly three full years to read it—mostly because I got to the bit that said "I'm not going to be politically correct" and threw it away in disgust/annoyance/come on, really? You're not edgy for saying this, you're just a jerk who can't recognise how you've benefitted from the systemic oppression of other people, and you feel like it's beneath you to be thoughtful and considerate of others. This book is, in a nutshell, why people hate salespeople. They're pu I loathed this book so much it took me nearly three full years to read it—mostly because I got to the bit that said "I'm not going to be politically correct" and threw it away in disgust/annoyance/come on, really? You're not edgy for saying this, you're just a jerk who can't recognise how you've benefitted from the systemic oppression of other people, and you feel like it's beneath you to be thoughtful and considerate of others. This book is, in a nutshell, why people hate salespeople. They're pushy, they listen to self-help tapes in their car, they buy into their own nonsense, and everything is a line aimed at pushing you to make them rich. It's Glengarry Glen Ross in book format. It's super cheesy. There are listicles everywhere. It feels like it was written and illustrated in 1984, and I'm sort of shocked it was actually 30 years later than that. It buys into the idea of a meritocracy like nobody's business, which tracks if you're a straight white dude who's largely unaware of how your own privilege. "Just work harder, and then things will work out for you" really does work. ("My boss won't buy my a laptop."/"They sell laptops at the computer store.") Apparently, we're all just lazy slobs who spend too much time watching television, and that's why we're not successful salespeople. Good to know. Also, it's a red flag when all the inspirational/successful people you reference are straight white dudes. Double that when they're Donald Trump and Thomas Edison, both total psychopaths riding on the coattails of people with actual skills and talents. Why did I loop back to this? Honestly, it's partly because I'm just trying to revisit my abandoned reads list (apparently I've been reading Sexus since 2013), and because it's a pretty short read, and maybe I'd be able to glen something from it to make it worthwhile. Strangely, by the end I kind of felt like I did. I stopped hating it quite so much. It's all stuff I kind of already knew—use testimonials, focus on solving people's needs, implement humour and creativity, build your personal brand—but I suppose it was nice to have validated, even if in an anecdotal sort of way. There's a great bit at the very end where he emails some hot-shot saleswoman, and she seems like a boss. Can we get her to write a book instead? I might be able to read that in less than a year, maybe.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ben Love

    Every year or so I’ll dig out a book on sales or selling and force myself to read it. Being a massive advocate of permissive marketing, I struggle to “get” sales – especially the interruptive type. Reading this type of book isn’t so much to let me learn sales as empathize with salespeople. This little red book, I’m told, is a classic. Now having read it, I kinda wish all sales people would read it too. It kicks off with “people hate being sold to, but they LOVE to buy”. Okay – I’m buying that. Th Every year or so I’ll dig out a book on sales or selling and force myself to read it. Being a massive advocate of permissive marketing, I struggle to “get” sales – especially the interruptive type. Reading this type of book isn’t so much to let me learn sales as empathize with salespeople. This little red book, I’m told, is a classic. Now having read it, I kinda wish all sales people would read it too. It kicks off with “people hate being sold to, but they LOVE to buy”. Okay – I’m buying that. The rest of the book points out all the bad things sales people do and gives a very solid right way to follow. Lots of good psychology (which I personally think is great – I can’t help but feel sales is only a psychological pursuit) and “do the right thing” philosophies. It’s a little cheesy, but overall it is a good book. While I’ll never be in sales (I just don’t roll that way), I think I can now be of more value to the salespeople around me.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    This was a great read. Gitomer writes an easy to understand manual on sales and what you need to do to be the best. One thing I had to get beyond is the style the book is written in, which sort of looks like one of those sprawling, hokey internet ads. Still, when I got around the presentation and into the meat of the material, I found there was a tremendous amount of value in the book. Two things about the binding. First, Gitomer included a built in ribbon bookmark- which I adore. Unfortunately, This was a great read. Gitomer writes an easy to understand manual on sales and what you need to do to be the best. One thing I had to get beyond is the style the book is written in, which sort of looks like one of those sprawling, hokey internet ads. Still, when I got around the presentation and into the meat of the material, I found there was a tremendous amount of value in the book. Two things about the binding. First, Gitomer included a built in ribbon bookmark- which I adore. Unfortunately, he also used a rough cloth cover that distracted me while I was trying to read. It was uncomfortable to hold the book for long periods of time, which is a shame because I didn't want to stop reading it!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    Mr. Gitomer is probably one of the best sale people AND motivational leaders writing books today. I bought this book because it looked good and I am always looking for little tidbits of information to share with the sales people I work with...because I have told myself for years I am NOT a salesperson. By the time I was done reading this book I was ready to hit the bricks and show people how it was done. VERY MOTIVATIONAL! I think this book is a great kick in the pants for anyone who thinks that t Mr. Gitomer is probably one of the best sale people AND motivational leaders writing books today. I bought this book because it looked good and I am always looking for little tidbits of information to share with the sales people I work with...because I have told myself for years I am NOT a salesperson. By the time I was done reading this book I was ready to hit the bricks and show people how it was done. VERY MOTIVATIONAL! I think this book is a great kick in the pants for anyone who thinks that they are in a slump or for the kid fresh out of school starting his first sales position. Great-Great Stuff.

  25. 4 out of 5

    MsSmartiePants ...like the candy...

    Make that: Currently Re-Reading! It's so good, I've got to listen again! Eeeeesh...a little harsh, but what the heck? It's great advice! You know, you've probably heard all of this before, however, if you're a life long learner like me, you seek to relearn and enforce concepts from a variety of sources. The guy's pretty entertaining as well. Read it twice. Really great the second time since I'm accustomed to his style of speaking and emphasis on the important stuff. He is really right on. You just Make that: Currently Re-Reading! It's so good, I've got to listen again! Eeeeesh...a little harsh, but what the heck? It's great advice! You know, you've probably heard all of this before, however, if you're a life long learner like me, you seek to relearn and enforce concepts from a variety of sources. The guy's pretty entertaining as well. Read it twice. Really great the second time since I'm accustomed to his style of speaking and emphasis on the important stuff. He is really right on. You just have to get beyond his style of communication. Check his attitude at the beginning and focus on the content. That's the real important part.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Carlos Rendon

    My favorite part of this book talks about how a lifestyle comes to be. You can think of your lifestyle as the sum of your actions. Philosophy drives your attitude, which drives your actions, which in turn produce your lifestyle. If you don't like your lifestyle you should not just consider your actions but also your attitude and philosophy. If your philosophy is poor you will have a poor attitude and you will take poor actions and end up with a poor lifestyle. I also like the Jeffrey is fully awar My favorite part of this book talks about how a lifestyle comes to be. You can think of your lifestyle as the sum of your actions. Philosophy drives your attitude, which drives your actions, which in turn produce your lifestyle. If you don't like your lifestyle you should not just consider your actions but also your attitude and philosophy. If your philosophy is poor you will have a poor attitude and you will take poor actions and end up with a poor lifestyle. I also like the Jeffrey is fully aware that we often know what is best for us, yet we do not decide to act on this information. We must strive to better ourselves and this is a difficult but worthwhile journey to make.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Natalie W

    This book is great. Against every bone in my body, I'm leaving it unfinished. You say, "Why? After all, you gave it 5 stars!" I know. But I'm not in sales at the moment. This book provides TONS of techniques, tricks, and resources for selling. I've already used several of the suggestions for personal networking and when helping a friend get their business off the ground. If you are in sales, this should absolutely be in your repertoire. I have a feeling it will be an indespensible reference tool This book is great. Against every bone in my body, I'm leaving it unfinished. You say, "Why? After all, you gave it 5 stars!" I know. But I'm not in sales at the moment. This book provides TONS of techniques, tricks, and resources for selling. I've already used several of the suggestions for personal networking and when helping a friend get their business off the ground. If you are in sales, this should absolutely be in your repertoire. I have a feeling it will be an indespensible reference tool for me.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Urja

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. In the Little Red Book of Selling, Jeffery Gitomer proposes his 12.5 principles on how sales work as they do. Throughout the novel, each principle collectively targets an audience of salespeople and presents them with the overarching question of what drives people to buy certain products over others. In solving this question, Gitomer argues that the attitudes of a seller are what drive success. Focusing on both a buyer and seller based approach, Gitomer helps the reader understand how to increas In the Little Red Book of Selling, Jeffery Gitomer proposes his 12.5 principles on how sales work as they do. Throughout the novel, each principle collectively targets an audience of salespeople and presents them with the overarching question of what drives people to buy certain products over others. In solving this question, Gitomer argues that the attitudes of a seller are what drive success. Focusing on both a buyer and seller based approach, Gitomer helps the reader understand how to increase sales and develop a relationship between the seller and buyer, increasing long term sales. To begin his book, Gitomer presents the question of why people buy. He analyzes trends in consumer buying behavior beyond just the basics and concludes that “liking is the single most important element” of selling. (Gitomer 7). He supports this claim by expressing that although customers consider the price and value of the product, the seller relationship is far more important to a buyer. By having a likeable and trustworthy sales rep, consumers are most likely to be convinced into purchasing their products as well as more likely to come back for future purchases. After emphasizing the importance of a seller buyer relationship, Gitomer begins listing his 12.5 theories of selling, based on his personal experiences. Out of all the principles, the three that stood out the most to support his argument on the attitude of the seller were principle 3, principle 4, and principle 7. The third principle is about personal branding in sales. In simpler terms it states that’s it’s “not about who you know; it’s who knows you” (Gitomer 54). Gitomer, throughout this chapter, emphasizes the importance of personal branding and getting your name out there. When a seller not only engages a buyer in the product but also expressed him/herself through a product, more sales are likely to be made. With this said, he believes that prospective consumers have to buy the salesperson before they move forward to buying the product, all coming back to the main idea of developing a strong seller-buyer relationship. Following along with the third principle, the fourth principle is about value and relationship as opposed to price. Gitomer admits that weighing in the price is a big consideration in making a purchase, however it is not one of the most important aspects of purchasing. Rather he gives importance to value for the customer more specifically appealing to the likings of the consumer. Value should also be considered in terms of lifetime use of a product rather than just in terms of making a sale, because no one really wants to buy a temporary product. Along with value, Gitomer places importance on the relationship, yet again, between the buyer and seller, but this time expresses this relationship in terms of customer life time value. Contrary to the idea that price is the most important aspect of a sale, Gitomer argues that value and relationship are far more important than the price tag in this chapter. The seventh principle discusses how to engage a prospect in order to sway their opinion in favor of a product. Gitomer places the importance of questioning in this theory as he believes they set the tone for sales. By doing so, you make yourself seem like a credible source of information, eliminate any possible competition, and get to know the buyer on a personal level, in turn closing a sale. Aside from being a convincing sales rep, Gitomer believes that if you can engage a customer through questioning you can possibly have them convince themselves in buying products. Although targeting sales, Gitomer book applies to those in both the business world and everyday life. He expresses that fault does not fall at the feet of the consumer of the seller but rather at the attitudes they both have going into a sale. He states that whining and complaining won’t get you anywhere but embracing flaws and working on them will get you far. He also says that in selling one should take risks because the outcomes can be beneficial. This applies to the real world because a bad attitude won’t get you anywhere but having a positive one will. Also the idea of taking risks is very applicable because trying new things will help you succeed in anything you do as opposed to cowardly sitting back and following a single routine and not pushing boundaries. I would rate this novel a 4.5 out of 5 stars because his personal experiences help build the credibility of the source. Many of his thoughts are hard to grasp at first, but re-reading the pages and principles creates a deeper understanding of his points. Although some of his thoughts may appear to be biased, his confidence in his principles helps make them understandable to all. Not concealing the truth behind his responses or sugar coating anything he writes about makes his ideas very relatable and believable. Having Gitomer speak from his own experiences, exposes the true reality of how sales work from a person who has benefitted and learned from making them. thoughts on developing customer relationships have been very applicable to myself because when a seller is engaging, I find myself more inclined into a buying that product as opposed to a sales rep who seems uninterested. Overall Gitomer ideas are very straight forward and very relatable to both the business world and life in general. I highly recommend this novel to anyone interested in behaviors of buyers and sellers, even of you are not a sales rep.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    Poorly written Maybe there’s some good info here but it’s hard to get past the immature formatting (stupid cartoons, lots of bold caps) and bad writing (incomplete sentences, missing punctuation, etc.) Also I’d love to know who this guy is. Yeah, he’s an author. Yeah, he’s a speaker. But what does he sell? Besides himself. Lastly, his chapter on humor was embarrassing. He’s not funny. But he’s clearly impressed with himself and thinks he is. He seemed like just another phony salesman to me.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    Great book on what you need to do to improve your ability to sell. Principles of life-long learning: Start with a positive attitude Listen to Audio tapes Read books Attend live seminars Spend 30 minutes a day learning something new Practice what you've learned as soon as you learn it and I loved the quote "Remember, you can't just waltz in and sell something-first you've got to lick his face for a few minutes" Great book on what you need to do to improve your ability to sell. Principles of life-long learning: Start with a positive attitude Listen to Audio tapes Read books Attend live seminars Spend 30 minutes a day learning something new Practice what you've learned as soon as you learn it and I loved the quote "Remember, you can't just waltz in and sell something-first you've got to lick his face for a few minutes"

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