website statistics Never Tell Our Business to Strangers: A Memoir - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Never Tell Our Business to Strangers: A Memoir

Availability: Ready to download

When Jennifer Mascia is five years old, the FBI comes for her father. At that moment Jenny realizes that her family isn’t exactly normal. What follows are months of confusion marked by visits with her father through thick glass, talking to him over a telephone attached to the wall. She and her mother crisscross the country, from California to New York to Miami and back aga When Jennifer Mascia is five years old, the FBI comes for her father. At that moment Jenny realizes that her family isn’t exactly normal. What follows are months of confusion marked by visits with her father through thick glass, talking to him over a telephone attached to the wall. She and her mother crisscross the country, from California to New York to Miami and back again. When her father finally returns home, months later, his absence is never explained—and Jenny is told that the family has a new last name.  It’s only much later that Jenny discovers that theirs was a life spent on the lam, trying to outrun the law. Thus begins the story of Jennifer Mascia’s bizarre but strangely magical childhood. An only child, she revels in her parents’ intense love for her—and rides the highs and lows of their equally passionate arguments. They are a tight-knit band, never allowing many outsiders in. And then there are the oddities that Jenny notices only as she gets older: the fact that her father had two names before he went away—in public he was Frank, but at home her mother called him Johnny; the neat, hidden hole in the carpet where her parents keep all their cash. The family sees wild swings in wealth—one year they’re shopping for Chanel and Louis Vuitton at posh shopping centers in Los Angeles, the next they’re living in one room and subsisting on food stamps.   What have her parents done? What was the reason for her father’s incarceration so many years ago? When Jenny, at twenty-two, uncovers her father’s criminal record during an Internet search, still more questions are raised. By then he is dying of cancer, so she presses her mother for answers, eliciting the first in a series of reluctant admissions about her father’s criminal past. Before her mother dies, four years later, Jenny is made privy to one final, riveting confession, which sets her on a search for the truth her mother fought to conceal for so many years. As Jenny unravels her family’s dark secrets, she must confront the grisly legacy she has inherited and the hard truth that her parents are not—and have never been—who they claimed to be. In the face of unimaginable tragedy, Jenny will ultimately find an acceptance and understanding just as meaningful and powerful as her parents’ love. In a memoir both raw and unwavering, Jennifer Mascia tells the amazing story of a life lived—unwittingly—with criminals. Full of great love and enormous loss, Never Tell Our Business to Strangers will captivate and enthrall, both with its unrelenting revelations and its honest, witty heart.  


Compare

When Jennifer Mascia is five years old, the FBI comes for her father. At that moment Jenny realizes that her family isn’t exactly normal. What follows are months of confusion marked by visits with her father through thick glass, talking to him over a telephone attached to the wall. She and her mother crisscross the country, from California to New York to Miami and back aga When Jennifer Mascia is five years old, the FBI comes for her father. At that moment Jenny realizes that her family isn’t exactly normal. What follows are months of confusion marked by visits with her father through thick glass, talking to him over a telephone attached to the wall. She and her mother crisscross the country, from California to New York to Miami and back again. When her father finally returns home, months later, his absence is never explained—and Jenny is told that the family has a new last name.  It’s only much later that Jenny discovers that theirs was a life spent on the lam, trying to outrun the law. Thus begins the story of Jennifer Mascia’s bizarre but strangely magical childhood. An only child, she revels in her parents’ intense love for her—and rides the highs and lows of their equally passionate arguments. They are a tight-knit band, never allowing many outsiders in. And then there are the oddities that Jenny notices only as she gets older: the fact that her father had two names before he went away—in public he was Frank, but at home her mother called him Johnny; the neat, hidden hole in the carpet where her parents keep all their cash. The family sees wild swings in wealth—one year they’re shopping for Chanel and Louis Vuitton at posh shopping centers in Los Angeles, the next they’re living in one room and subsisting on food stamps.   What have her parents done? What was the reason for her father’s incarceration so many years ago? When Jenny, at twenty-two, uncovers her father’s criminal record during an Internet search, still more questions are raised. By then he is dying of cancer, so she presses her mother for answers, eliciting the first in a series of reluctant admissions about her father’s criminal past. Before her mother dies, four years later, Jenny is made privy to one final, riveting confession, which sets her on a search for the truth her mother fought to conceal for so many years. As Jenny unravels her family’s dark secrets, she must confront the grisly legacy she has inherited and the hard truth that her parents are not—and have never been—who they claimed to be. In the face of unimaginable tragedy, Jenny will ultimately find an acceptance and understanding just as meaningful and powerful as her parents’ love. In a memoir both raw and unwavering, Jennifer Mascia tells the amazing story of a life lived—unwittingly—with criminals. Full of great love and enormous loss, Never Tell Our Business to Strangers will captivate and enthrall, both with its unrelenting revelations and its honest, witty heart.  

30 review for Never Tell Our Business to Strangers: A Memoir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    This is not a book for people who look to the Godfather and the Sopranos for cultural insight into Italian-Americans. Instead, this is a very well thought out book about a daughter coming to terms with her imperfect parents, largely after their deaths. By piecing together family conversations, and through her own research, Jennifer Mascia is able to understand her parents simply as adults rather than as her own mother and father. A major strength - Mascia explains her grief at both parents' deat This is not a book for people who look to the Godfather and the Sopranos for cultural insight into Italian-Americans. Instead, this is a very well thought out book about a daughter coming to terms with her imperfect parents, largely after their deaths. By piecing together family conversations, and through her own research, Jennifer Mascia is able to understand her parents simply as adults rather than as her own mother and father. A major strength - Mascia explains her grief at both parents' deaths better than I've read in some self-help books on grieving. Mascia puts forth in the prologue a scenario she says she wishes were true - both parents alive and healthy, her Jewish mother cooking a huge Sunday dinner for her Italian father and herself, all the while engaging in light-hearted ribbing. Thus she sets forth the point of the book - as she says herself, the past is in the past. Rather than feeling betrayed by the life her parents led, and ultimately led her through, Mascia comes to terms with their choices. As for weaknesses, the only one I'd even consider is that Mascia seemed to have a bit of a problem wrapping the story up - by this I mean there were a few pages I skipped in the last chapter. The writing throughout is evocative and meaty, with emotions resting on the surface. But, I don't want to portray this as a heavy, weepy tome about the sins of the father. Sure, there are some frank portrayals of disfunctional family life, but Mascia interlaces these brilliantly with conversations with friends in which she deconstructs her family's actions. We as readers are brought into Mascia's thought process. It's a very intimate book, for sure. Mascia also does a brilliant job of making dark situations seem light, while refusing to sugar-coat any of her parents actions, whether criminal or simply mean-spirited. Overall a very good read, and a quick one at that. Finally, I'm not hiding the review for spoilers because the point of the book isn't that her parents die - it's that she learns to understand how they lived.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    This true tale of one woman's childhood on the run from her parents' criminal activities is deeply personal and poignant in parts, though ultimately the narrative voice kept me from sinking completely into the story. Jennifer Mascia, whose life was shaped by the activities of her parents and a past she didn't learn about until after her father's death, is certainly exorcising her fair share of demons here, and rightfully so. I definitely felt for the lonely child so caught up in her parents dram This true tale of one woman's childhood on the run from her parents' criminal activities is deeply personal and poignant in parts, though ultimately the narrative voice kept me from sinking completely into the story. Jennifer Mascia, whose life was shaped by the activities of her parents and a past she didn't learn about until after her father's death, is certainly exorcising her fair share of demons here, and rightfully so. I definitely felt for the lonely child so caught up in her parents dramas, though I thought the book itself could have been more tightly edited. It does get repetitive in places, and seemingly builds toward narrative peaks that then somehow are revealed as only plateaus. I also didn't appreciate Mascia's moments of self-loathing when she speaks of wearing size 14/16 pants; it was off-putting and didn't seem to fit into the narrative. Though Mascia herself seems to have forgiven her parents for her unconventional upbringing, it is hard for the reader to do the same. Though her parents undoubtedly loved her, they certainly seemed to love themselves more, and gave little to no thought to the impact their actions would have on their young impressionable child. Well-written and even conversational in parts, this book certainly highlights the seamy side of life in the Mafia while demonstrating the painful effect parents can have on their children. Raw in parts, this memoir is nevertheless painfully honest- a solid offering from a novice writer.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    There are many memoirs currently available to read but how many people can say that their father was wanted by the FBI and who used to be a business associate with Joey Gallo, a big time mobster before the Gotti family. Author and nighttime news assistant of the New York Times, Jennifer Mascia calls this life. When Jennifer was a little girl, she can remember a time when the FBI came to arrest her father right before Christmas. Jennifer asked her mother’s boss if this was real and her mother’s b There are many memoirs currently available to read but how many people can say that their father was wanted by the FBI and who used to be a business associate with Joey Gallo, a big time mobster before the Gotti family. Author and nighttime news assistant of the New York Times, Jennifer Mascia calls this life. When Jennifer was a little girl, she can remember a time when the FBI came to arrest her father right before Christmas. Jennifer asked her mother’s boss if this was real and her mother’s boss responded that this was not real and they were filming a movie. Though, Jennifer wanted so hard to believe him, Jennifer knew that what was happening was for real. Due to her father’s involvement with drugs, mobsters and shooting someone, Jennifer and her family were always on the move. They live in California, Florida, and New York. Even with all of the things Jennifer’s father did, he was still a good father to Jennifer and her mother. People can change. I read this book in one sitting. I found it fascinating that I couldn’t stop reading. For the short time I was reading this book, I felt like I was part of Jennifer’s family. Part of this was due to the family pictures included throughout this memoir. Jennifer’s father was a nice guy. I am not usually a fan of memoirs but I was a fan of this one. So glad that Ms. Mascia decided to go ahead and share about her family and childhood unlike the title of this book…Never Tell Our Business to Strangers.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michelle

    2.5 stars. Once again a memoir for which reviews and cover copy oversell certain aspects. I was expecting this to be about a unknowing girl plunked in the middle of Sopranos set; her parents are mobsters but she hasn't a clue. That is not this book. For the first 1/3-1/2 all I kept thinking was "this guy was nothing more than a con man." Think tax evasion, credit fraud, and identity theft. It was shades of Glass Castle but far less compelling. It does turn out the father is connected (as opposed 2.5 stars. Once again a memoir for which reviews and cover copy oversell certain aspects. I was expecting this to be about a unknowing girl plunked in the middle of Sopranos set; her parents are mobsters but she hasn't a clue. That is not this book. For the first 1/3-1/2 all I kept thinking was "this guy was nothing more than a con man." Think tax evasion, credit fraud, and identity theft. It was shades of Glass Castle but far less compelling. It does turn out the father is connected (as opposed to "made") and definitely engaged in some gangster-like activity, but this was all before the daughter was born. It just had a much less emotional impact when she found out after the fact. But given she found out about extraneous siblings randomly at some point in her childhood, she had to know her parents hid things from her. And the way the realizations unfolded at the end "told" instead of "showed." Think lots of long conversations. It was almost boring to read even though it was some very major stuff. That said, this was a fast read and the relationship the author has/had with her parents is very endearing even in its dysfunction. Just proves what I believe: it's actually not that hard to be a good parent. Being there for your children pretty much covers it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Tom Armstrong

    This book contains a few really well written sentences, but overall it's not worth the time. A few initial impressions: 1) It would be easy to cut at least 100 pages out of the this book without harming the story 2) The cover copy completely oversells what this book is about. At heart, it's a story about a young woman struggling to understand who she is and (view spoiler)[ to deal with the loss of her parents (hide spoiler)] . It's just not about life on the run from the mob or the authorities 3) Th This book contains a few really well written sentences, but overall it's not worth the time. A few initial impressions: 1) It would be easy to cut at least 100 pages out of the this book without harming the story 2) The cover copy completely oversells what this book is about. At heart, it's a story about a young woman struggling to understand who she is and (view spoiler)[ to deal with the loss of her parents (hide spoiler)] . It's just not about life on the run from the mob or the authorities 3) The author is not terribly sympathetic. She comes across as whiny and entitled far too often.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

    I enjoyed this memoir about a woman who grew up with criminal parents that were just parents to her. After her death she found out the extent of their involvement and their secrets. She goes to therapy to deal with what she learned. A brave, honest, fascinating account.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    This book has two running motifs: love and secrecy. These motifs are interconnected through a well thought-out and incredibly written story about a young girl turned woman and her struggles of figuring out of truth of her father's criminal past (being a drug dealer and a murderer on multiple accounts). When Mascia finally finds the answers, her life spirals and takes the rollercoaster on an emotional rollercoaster as they travel from sunny Orange County, California living the in the lap of luxur This book has two running motifs: love and secrecy. These motifs are interconnected through a well thought-out and incredibly written story about a young girl turned woman and her struggles of figuring out of truth of her father's criminal past (being a drug dealer and a murderer on multiple accounts). When Mascia finally finds the answers, her life spirals and takes the rollercoaster on an emotional rollercoaster as they travel from sunny Orange County, California living the in the lap of luxury to Long Island living in poverty, to the hospitals where both her parents die. The book is a tear-jerker, a comedy, and an accurate depeiction of life. Though it has an ironic title, its a very good read!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Deb

    This started out as just another story of one more dysfunctional family in the US. The more I read this book, the more I became involved in the family dynamics and the love that evolved in this family. Thank you Jennifer Mascia for sharing your story with us. Even though your parents had their many issues, your book made enjoy being with your family. Growing up I thought my family was the only crazy family there was. In my 48 years of life, I've learned that many other families dealt with a lot This started out as just another story of one more dysfunctional family in the US. The more I read this book, the more I became involved in the family dynamics and the love that evolved in this family. Thank you Jennifer Mascia for sharing your story with us. Even though your parents had their many issues, your book made enjoy being with your family. Growing up I thought my family was the only crazy family there was. In my 48 years of life, I've learned that many other families dealt with a lot bigger issues and it makes my family problems seem small in comparison.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alissa

    I'm not sure why I read this. It was recommended from somewhere and I can't remember where now which frustrates me. It was an ok memoir. I felt there was too much minutia about the early days and kept being surprised that there was more to write about. I could've easily cut 100 pages from the narrative. I'm not sure why I read this. It was recommended from somewhere and I can't remember where now which frustrates me. It was an ok memoir. I felt there was too much minutia about the early days and kept being surprised that there was more to write about. I could've easily cut 100 pages from the narrative.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kara

    I'm done with this book. It's boring. Really, really boring. I'm halfway through, and the Big Mystery has been revealed. I can only assume the rest of the book is about the author building her life in New York while bursting into tears every 2 pages. I feel bad that I don't like it, since it's her actual life, but this really would have made a better magazine article than a 400 page memoir. I'm done with this book. It's boring. Really, really boring. I'm halfway through, and the Big Mystery has been revealed. I can only assume the rest of the book is about the author building her life in New York while bursting into tears every 2 pages. I feel bad that I don't like it, since it's her actual life, but this really would have made a better magazine article than a 400 page memoir.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Fran

    This book could have used a harsh editor that would have cut the length by at least 200 pages. There was a bit of an interesting story in there somewhere, but you had to get through a bunch of repetitive nonsense to get there.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kristin

    the worst ever; couldn't finish. not a good writer and not really an interesting story. memoir of a girl / woman who grows up with parents she doesn't realize are life-long criminals. sounded kind of interesting but WASN'T! the worst ever; couldn't finish. not a good writer and not really an interesting story. memoir of a girl / woman who grows up with parents she doesn't realize are life-long criminals. sounded kind of interesting but WASN'T!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Becky C.

    I listened to this and it was very hard to stick with it until the end (18 parts). I definitely liked the first half better than the second half. It's an interesting story but it just seemed to go on far too long. I listened to this and it was very hard to stick with it until the end (18 parts). I definitely liked the first half better than the second half. It's an interesting story but it just seemed to go on far too long.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    An interesting biography giving insight to how one can love someone who is capable of terrible things.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    The better part of me says that this book has value because it's about the struggle of a woman growing up to realize that the parents she idolized and loved are not perfect, as are none of us, while also finding out that they have lived immoral, criminal lives, and the dichotomy between her love for them and her disgust at their actions. Warning - spoilers ahead, but it's too much to add spoiler tags for every other sentence. That's the better part of me. The rest of me almost gave up on this bo The better part of me says that this book has value because it's about the struggle of a woman growing up to realize that the parents she idolized and loved are not perfect, as are none of us, while also finding out that they have lived immoral, criminal lives, and the dichotomy between her love for them and her disgust at their actions. Warning - spoilers ahead, but it's too much to add spoiler tags for every other sentence. That's the better part of me. The rest of me almost gave up on this book about 150 pages in. Jennifer spends a lot of time talking about her young life, about how much she loved her father, about what a great guy he was, and how luxuriously they lived, buying clothing and home items on credit cards, their amazing life in the California sunshine. How her dad was a charismatic, wonderful man, and her mom was a well-educated, brilliant, philosophical woman. Except. All those shiny new possesions were purchased on credit cards that the parents had no intention of paying. The great mystery of why dad was nabbed by the FBI right in front of her. How she cried, alllllll the time, often "hysterically". How dad leaves town to start over, leaving Jennifer and her mom to live in a room in a friend's house. The brother and sisters she never knew she had. The bankruptcies. Mom sitting around smoking and reading in her bathrobe buying more and more stuff and not working while the family fell further apart financially. The screaming fights between all of them. The aunt who lives in the lap of luxury on the salary of a restaurant manager. The financial scheming and fraud. As Jennifer gets older, she starts to realize that things aren't adding up, and through years of investigation, she finds out that her father was a drug-dealing murderer, her mother aided and abetted him in some of his crimes, the aunt was his conspirator in selling cocaine, that her wonderful father was a low-life, cheating, murderous mafia "connected" criminal thug. Jennfer vacillitates between her love for her dad and disgust and horror at his actions. She also expresses admiration for her parents' penchant for larceny. She has moments of complete selfishness, understandable after how she has been raised. She finds out her parents met when her father was in prison and her mother was having an affair with a married man. Real peaches, huh? As many other reviewers have said, this book needed a good edit. It was just far too long. Even after all of that content, I still didn't have a grasp of who her father was, or how he turned out the way he did, other than a charming, narcissistic criminal. She had access to people who knew him "when", but spent most of her time on his criminal activities. The main thing, I guess, is that her parents were awful people, a detriment to society, but she loved them, helped care for them when they were sick, and apparently has turned out ok.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Caitlyn

    I listened to the audiobook and it’s a long one and I’m amazed people say they can read it in one sitting. It is interesting and holds ones attention. I got this audiobook from the library and didn’t know much about the book other than mafia ties and it was available right then. I was expecting a bit more of a true crime book. I don’t think I was expecting the memoir I got. I’d say the book centers around Jennifer’s tight family bond. As she grows older she learns her beloved father was a mafia I listened to the audiobook and it’s a long one and I’m amazed people say they can read it in one sitting. It is interesting and holds ones attention. I got this audiobook from the library and didn’t know much about the book other than mafia ties and it was available right then. I was expecting a bit more of a true crime book. I don’t think I was expecting the memoir I got. I’d say the book centers around Jennifer’s tight family bond. As she grows older she learns her beloved father was a mafia hit man and drug pusher. Oddly her childhood seems fairly typical despite this and she’s known the wider for years .i wasn’t expecting an emotional tear jerker on the deaths of parents and loss of childhood and family. She describes these experiences well and it’s very relatable even if your parents aren’t murderers or enablers of murderers.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Terri

    This was a lot of words. Not this many were needed to tell this story. Perhaps this should have been a magazine article. A book of this length should really explore what it means to have a father who is a drug dealer (alongside her aunt and with her mother's help) and a murderer. Instead we get an account of childhood with excruciating detail. In the end, I'm left trying to figure out why she loved this people so much. As is she. This was a lot of words. Not this many were needed to tell this story. Perhaps this should have been a magazine article. A book of this length should really explore what it means to have a father who is a drug dealer (alongside her aunt and with her mother's help) and a murderer. Instead we get an account of childhood with excruciating detail. In the end, I'm left trying to figure out why she loved this people so much. As is she.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Nicole

    Though it was not written in a style I normally read, this work was well thought out, and equal parts objective and subjective. Having grown up in similar circumstances, I deeply appreciated the author’s difficulty with separating the father she loved and the killer she knew him to be. Very interesting read.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mylinda

    2.5 stars. Not bad, just slow and draggy.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    DNF at 43%. I really enjoyed the first 20%, but got tired with the long chapters and sloggy middle.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rosa

    Did you ever want a book to end? I didn’t stop because I thought it would get better. It never did.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    Got bogged down in the middle. TMI. Could have been edited to make it shorter.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Courtney Furye

    Never tell our business to strangers is a book written by Jennifer Mascia who wrote a book in the times about discovering her father,John was a killer and a drug dealer for the mafia. I thought it would be an interesting read, the title sounds cool. The book was in my opinion boring I felt like I was reading the same thing over and over again. Even though I thought The book was kinda boring that didn't stop me from Finding the main character Jennifer to be a very forgiving and understand Persson Never tell our business to strangers is a book written by Jennifer Mascia who wrote a book in the times about discovering her father,John was a killer and a drug dealer for the mafia. I thought it would be an interesting read, the title sounds cool. The book was in my opinion boring I felt like I was reading the same thing over and over again. Even though I thought The book was kinda boring that didn't stop me from Finding the main character Jennifer to be a very forgiving and understand Persson making me think of her not only as the main character but as the best character. Jennifer throughout the book after finding out about her dad's criminal past found a way to understand and forgive him which is something i'm not sure I would be able to do if I was in her position. That part in the book where Jennifer found out about her dad past I would have to say is my favorite part as well as the only part I really enjoyed when reading. That part of the book where Jennifer finds out about her dad's criminal past was in the beginning of the book chapter 1 where it starts of with Jennifer talking about when she was five years of age and the F.B.I came to her family's house in search for her father. While Jen's dad was being handcuffed for all his wrong doing by the F.B.I Jennifer’s mother and her friend instead of telling her the truth and being honest about the things that was going on continuously lied and said to her “no honey”when she asked if her dad was really being arrested . Instead of honesty Jen’ mom and her mom’s friend chose to lie to her saying “ it's not real” ( what the family friend said). What I don't understand is why they wanted to cover up what the father has done, why didn’t they just tell Jen what was going on yeh Jen would of been definitely upset but at least Jen would of had one last thing to be upset about, she wouldn't of had to deal with her moms lies. I would not recommend this book . To me this book just dragged on so I would change how the book was written. The book should of been cut in half because to me the middle of the book was her just talking about things that didn’t really need to be added it wasn't necessary. The beginning of the book and the ending was good but the middle was not important and shouldn't of been written,about 100 pages should of been cut then I think I would of enjoyed the story more. After reading the book I found myself learning something despite the fact that I really didn't enjoy the book all that much. what I learned was that everybody has their secret another thing I learned was that it takes a real amazing person to forgive after being lied to and hurt as much as Jennifer has been throught the book. This was a book that had a great beginning and ending but towards the middle seemed to lack and need to be changed up. The book never tell our business to strangers wasn't the best but wasn't the worst book I have ever read, would I read it again probably not and I wouldn't recommend it but that's just my opinion and you're entitled to yours read it if you want.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Ladysatel

    The author of this story was five years old when she saw her father arrested by the FBI and taken away for months. After her father returned, her mother told her he was arrested by mistake. The FBI had been looking for someone else with the same name. As she continued to grow up she began to realize her family was not like other families. They moved often, sometimes into a nice house and sometimes into a low rent apartment. Her parents never used a bank. They would hide their money under the car The author of this story was five years old when she saw her father arrested by the FBI and taken away for months. After her father returned, her mother told her he was arrested by mistake. The FBI had been looking for someone else with the same name. As she continued to grow up she began to realize her family was not like other families. They moved often, sometimes into a nice house and sometimes into a low rent apartment. Her parents never used a bank. They would hide their money under the carpeting. When she began to question what was happening her mother would tell her not to worry. But Jennifer Mascia the author knew she was being lied to and determined to find out what really was going on. During the years to adulthood and through college she began to piece together pieces of her parents lives to find out they were not the people they represented themselves to be. As her father lay dying he confessed he had once killed a man. Jennifer's search for the truth intensified. Her mother became ill and she began to tell her daughter more about the family secrets. However, to fully understand her parents after her mother died Jennifer turned to remaining members of the family and others who had known them. What she discovered was shocking. Yet in spite of what she discovered she still loved her parents. A fascinating story about one person's search for the truth.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    Jennifer Mascia knew her family was different when the FBI came to arrest her father when she was 5 years old. What followed was years moving from place to place, blowing through credit cards and money like it was nothing and lots of fighting between everyone. But, there was also a lot of love - Jennifer was the only child of her parents, although her father had 3 other children from a previous marriage. So, Jennifer was doted on by both her parents and she helped them both when a few years apar Jennifer Mascia knew her family was different when the FBI came to arrest her father when she was 5 years old. What followed was years moving from place to place, blowing through credit cards and money like it was nothing and lots of fighting between everyone. But, there was also a lot of love - Jennifer was the only child of her parents, although her father had 3 other children from a previous marriage. So, Jennifer was doted on by both her parents and she helped them both when a few years apart they were each diagnosed with lung cancer that would eventually kill them. Only after both her parents were dead did Jennifer find out the REAL story of her parents and the huge secrets they both hid. I was a little dissapointed with this book overall, the last few chapters were the best - that was when she was really finding out the truth about her parents. Their life was so dysfunctional so a lot of the book is recaps of the fighting, moving, money problems, etc. Overall interesting, but not as good as I hoped.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Paige

    I'll admit it, I laughed and I cried at times throughout this book because the clinques can be true to almost any family. It's a memoir by Jennifer Mascia, who tells the story of her childhood, learning of her family's secrets, betrayals and the ability to move past it knowing that you were loved. Not alot of people can say that their father was wanted by the FBI and was a business associate with Joey Gallo, a big time mobster even before the Gotti family. Early on, you can sense that the author I'll admit it, I laughed and I cried at times throughout this book because the clinques can be true to almost any family. It's a memoir by Jennifer Mascia, who tells the story of her childhood, learning of her family's secrets, betrayals and the ability to move past it knowing that you were loved. Not alot of people can say that their father was wanted by the FBI and was a business associate with Joey Gallo, a big time mobster even before the Gotti family. Early on, you can sense that the author misses her parents and tries to honor them by explaining that they tried to shelter her and did the best they could. (While, much of the time, it is not flatterhing) It starts at a young age when she first sees her father being arrested, carries on as they family moves endless times and why, her mother explains, that while her fathers name is "Johnny", the family is going to call him "Frankie" just for a little while. While some of the stories are a little too long, it's an interesting read from a family members perspective.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Giselle

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book was so bad it's hard to know where to even begin. So I'll just list the top 10 things that come to mind. 1. I had to force myself to read it, which is never a good sign. 2. From the synopsis it sounds like it'll be exciting and full of scandal. It's not exciting in the least. 3. I really did not care for the main girl AT ALL. 4. Does she have to cry every 5 seconds? 5. Her actions should tell us things rather than her words, for example, we don't just gather that she's always wanted to be a This book was so bad it's hard to know where to even begin. So I'll just list the top 10 things that come to mind. 1. I had to force myself to read it, which is never a good sign. 2. From the synopsis it sounds like it'll be exciting and full of scandal. It's not exciting in the least. 3. I really did not care for the main girl AT ALL. 4. Does she have to cry every 5 seconds? 5. Her actions should tell us things rather than her words, for example, we don't just gather that she's always wanted to be a journalist, she just all of a sudden says 'mom, I'm going to work at the New York Times!' as if that's her mom's dying wish. Where in the world did that come from? I had no idea. 6. Should someone really be so proud of the mob work her parents were involved in? It's creepy. 7. Her parents were awful, awful people. I don't care about them either. 8. She really shouldn't be bragging all over town that her dad killed people, it's really not cool. 9. Why does she have to tell us every detail of her parents dying? It was very uncomfortable. 10. I was just bored.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book was not at all what I was expecting from the publisher's synopsis, and that was a huge disappointment This book is not about a girl's life with a father in the Mafia, it was 400 pages of her finding out that her dad was in the Mafia before she was born. Throughout her childhood, during which she went to private school and was a cheerleader, she had no idea her father was a criminal. While his life may have been interesting (not that we know), hers certainly was not. There are several i This book was not at all what I was expecting from the publisher's synopsis, and that was a huge disappointment This book is not about a girl's life with a father in the Mafia, it was 400 pages of her finding out that her dad was in the Mafia before she was born. Throughout her childhood, during which she went to private school and was a cheerleader, she had no idea her father was a criminal. While his life may have been interesting (not that we know), hers certainly was not. There are several issues I had with this book. It was way, way to long and could have used some serious editing. At no time do you get a sense of Jennifer and who she is. The only thing I can tell you about her personality after reading this book is that she cries. A lot. She doesn't show you anything with her writing, she tells you. The writing was poor, it could have been at least half as long, and above all, it was just plain boring.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Meg

    This book was written as an attempt for the author to cope with her parents' deaths. Although her parents did live interesting lives (her father was associated with mob activities), the narration by their daughter is frustrating if you expect this to be a biography of their lives. Mascia simply doesn't have enough adult perspective and information to be able to provide a biography. At one point she actually consults a forensic psychoanalyst to posthumously shrink her parents, and a good chunk of This book was written as an attempt for the author to cope with her parents' deaths. Although her parents did live interesting lives (her father was associated with mob activities), the narration by their daughter is frustrating if you expect this to be a biography of their lives. Mascia simply doesn't have enough adult perspective and information to be able to provide a biography. At one point she actually consults a forensic psychoanalyst to posthumously shrink her parents, and a good chunk of the book is spent reading newspaper articles she discovered. Really anyone with similar resources could have learned much of the same information. If you go into it expecting a memoir of her grief (a la Didion's Year of Magical Thinking), you will probably enjoy it more. In this respect, it probably does a good job conveying the loss that very young adults experience when they lose a parent.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brady

    It's not Mob Wives, which I guess is what I was expecting. Honestly, through most of the book I kept wondering why she bothered to publish it. It's so very very personal, her own struggle to discover who her parents really were and to deal with her grief at their deaths. This wasn't to me the story of a Mob Princess (not that she claims to be. Maybe the book's marketers screwed up) but really the story of a child of addicts, from a family of broken people. She doesn't offer easy answers, or much It's not Mob Wives, which I guess is what I was expecting. Honestly, through most of the book I kept wondering why she bothered to publish it. It's so very very personal, her own struggle to discover who her parents really were and to deal with her grief at their deaths. This wasn't to me the story of a Mob Princess (not that she claims to be. Maybe the book's marketers screwed up) but really the story of a child of addicts, from a family of broken people. She doesn't offer easy answers, or much hope, beyond her own survival, which for now seems like enough for her. Technically, the book would be stronger if it was organized a little better. Mascia takes the reader on her own journey from naive child to adult searching for the truth, so events are jumbled and often repeated. So no spoilers here really, because the book spoils itself.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...