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Pastoral Ministry: How to Shepherd Biblically

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Encouraging, insightful, and challenging, Pastoral Ministry is designed for a new generation of shepherds who seek to lead with the passion of the apostles. Written by MacArthur and his colleagues at The Master's Seminary, this guide outlines the biblical priorities essential to effective ministry. Other contributors include: Richard L. Mayhue, James F. Stitzinger, Alex D. Encouraging, insightful, and challenging, Pastoral Ministry is designed for a new generation of shepherds who seek to lead with the passion of the apostles. Written by MacArthur and his colleagues at The Master's Seminary, this guide outlines the biblical priorities essential to effective ministry. Other contributors include: Richard L. Mayhue, James F. Stitzinger, Alex D. Montoya, James M. George, Irvin A. Busenitz, James E. Rosscup, Donard G. McDougall, Robert L. Thomas, David C. Deuel, George J. Zemek, and S. Lance Quinn.


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Encouraging, insightful, and challenging, Pastoral Ministry is designed for a new generation of shepherds who seek to lead with the passion of the apostles. Written by MacArthur and his colleagues at The Master's Seminary, this guide outlines the biblical priorities essential to effective ministry. Other contributors include: Richard L. Mayhue, James F. Stitzinger, Alex D. Encouraging, insightful, and challenging, Pastoral Ministry is designed for a new generation of shepherds who seek to lead with the passion of the apostles. Written by MacArthur and his colleagues at The Master's Seminary, this guide outlines the biblical priorities essential to effective ministry. Other contributors include: Richard L. Mayhue, James F. Stitzinger, Alex D. Montoya, James M. George, Irvin A. Busenitz, James E. Rosscup, Donard G. McDougall, Robert L. Thomas, David C. Deuel, George J. Zemek, and S. Lance Quinn.

30 review for Pastoral Ministry: How to Shepherd Biblically

  1. 5 out of 5

    Javier Jara Bao

    Buen libro, de esta serie el que más me ha gustado. Da en el clavo en mi hos aspectos. Me gusta su perspectiva más práctica para presentar varios temas.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Klimek

    John MacArthur in his book Rediscovering Pastoral Ministry covers the whole gambit addressing the calling of God, prayer, personal priorities, worship, study, preaching, outreach, discipleship, training, ordination and a host of other essential responsibilities in Pastoral ministry. MacArthur explains the importance of having accountability relationships: first to God; then to one’s home environment—wife and children; third, to co-laborers and friends; fourth to the pulpit, using the discipline o John MacArthur in his book Rediscovering Pastoral Ministry covers the whole gambit addressing the calling of God, prayer, personal priorities, worship, study, preaching, outreach, discipleship, training, ordination and a host of other essential responsibilities in Pastoral ministry. MacArthur explains the importance of having accountability relationships: first to God; then to one’s home environment—wife and children; third, to co-laborers and friends; fourth to the pulpit, using the discipline of study as a corrective force in one’s life; and fifthly, godly, devout men from other churches. MacΑrthur explains that the Lord’s Supper is an anticipatory celebration of the Lord’s imminent return (p. 356). I will certainly bring this out next time I am asked to lead a communion service. I appreciate Montoya’s explanation on the important role of Leadership in the life and mission of the church (p. 281); and it is sobering to think that the Pastor is the one who is called to provide ultimate leadership for the church irrespective of church polity (p. 282). It was good to be reminded that leadership in the church is different from leadership in the world (p. 287). This is particularly important for me remember, having worked in the corporate world for several years. Contrary to the corporate world, one doesn’t measure success in ministry based on the results but on faithfulness (p. 287 cf. 1 Cor 4:2). Following our Savior, the Pastor is to exercise servant leadership. The seven leadership qualities are particularly helpful for personal evaluation and striving: decision-making, self-discipline, communication, skills, amenable, inspirational, lead (p. 290–296). This is an excellent resource for Pastors—one that needs to be read often.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Michael Pagan

    It's MacArthur (and crew), so some is good and some not so much. Anything Scripture speaks on explicitly, he's good on. Anything you have to draw inferences on, he's a biblicist and probably hasn't thought through quite enough. Chapter 2, on the history of pastoral ministry, is pretty appalling—heretical sects are baptized and legitimate growth within the church catholic's understanding is minimized. In addition, he makes claims (e.g. all pastors must have only believing children and must have n It's MacArthur (and crew), so some is good and some not so much. Anything Scripture speaks on explicitly, he's good on. Anything you have to draw inferences on, he's a biblicist and probably hasn't thought through quite enough. Chapter 2, on the history of pastoral ministry, is pretty appalling—heretical sects are baptized and legitimate growth within the church catholic's understanding is minimized. In addition, he makes claims (e.g. all pastors must have only believing children and must have no significant sin within their past) which he contradicts in later sermons, so the book isn't necessarily even representative of MacArthur's views.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Timothy

    This book is separated into 22 chapters each focusing on different aspects. It's a broad overview of pastoral ministry. It is quite general but covers the important points. This would be a good place to start to see the scope of pastoral ministry and different issues related to it. The chapters are written by different authors and so it does feel a bit scattered in places. Some chapters give more practical advise while others go down to the Greek to argue a specific viewpoint. This book is separated into 22 chapters each focusing on different aspects. It's a broad overview of pastoral ministry. It is quite general but covers the important points. This would be a good place to start to see the scope of pastoral ministry and different issues related to it. The chapters are written by different authors and so it does feel a bit scattered in places. Some chapters give more practical advise while others go down to the Greek to argue a specific viewpoint.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Bro. Austin McCormick

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This book was given to me by one of my dear brothers in Christ, and Pastoral mentor, Bro. Mike Brown. This book has been a great encouragement to me and reveals the full spectrum of pastoral ministry. I highly recommend to any Pastor/Youth Pastor/Minister. This book would also be helpful for church members to read, if you would like to get a glimpse at the struggles that your Senior Pastor goes through to serve the Lord!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael Beck

    This book is a must read for any pastor/elder currently in or hopes to be in ministry. MacArthur and the TMS faculty bring much insight from their many decades of pastoral experience. If you want a biblically based idea of ministry, (in an age where pastors are expected to be something other than what Scripture says,) read this book.

  7. 5 out of 5

    L. R. Bouligny Bouligny

    The church of the 21st century is plagued by many attacks—those from without and those from within. Those that come from within are usually birthed from an inadequate view of Scripture. This can be seen most clearly in the way that churches organize their leadership. The world system has corrupted how the church views everything from membership to administration, and it is the job of the Pastor to lead Christ’s church in a God-honoring way without being influenced by the fleeting methodology of The church of the 21st century is plagued by many attacks—those from without and those from within. Those that come from within are usually birthed from an inadequate view of Scripture. This can be seen most clearly in the way that churches organize their leadership. The world system has corrupted how the church views everything from membership to administration, and it is the job of the Pastor to lead Christ’s church in a God-honoring way without being influenced by the fleeting methodology of men. The twenty-two chapters that make up this volume are geared to shed some light on the need for a strong shepherd who can lead the people of God. The book wisely begins with answering the question, What is a pastor? It proceeds to not only answer this question from a biblical viewpoint, but also spends a chapter examining this role throughout church history—where the church has gotten it right, and where she has veered way off course. The next section seeks to examine what is required of the man who is to achieve this task. Since the Scripture puts much importance on the character of the one who is to lead, so too does Pastoral Ministry. How is a man to be who is a leader? What are the qualifications, and how will he know if this calling pertains to him? These questions are answered and given the necessary attention they deserve. There is even a chapter explaining the process of ordination, which was extremely helpful. Following this is a look into the personal life of a pastor. His prayer life, his devotional life, his study time, and even how his home is to be run. I personally found the chapter on prayer by Donald G. McDougall extremely relevant and helpful when it comes to the responsibility of organizing prayer within the church body. He emphasizes that prayer is not secondary to the ministry, but it is the ministry. Churches who do not hold prayer in high esteem will have little power in the world, and stifle the growth of members of the body, as they will find other activities to supplement what should be time set aside for prayer. The remaining 9 chapters are devoted to the different aspects or “perspectives” or pastoral ministry. Everything from worship to discipling to the observing of ordinances. One chapter in particular that really stood out to me was the chapter called “Outreaching” by Dr. Montoya. A very practical and helpful look at how the church can be a light in the community, which included some useful ways on how to interact with the surrounding culture. Is the pastor really responsible for leading the people in evangelism? This helpful chapter answers this question in the affirmative, and gives a biblical basis as to why. One last chapter that was helpful was by John Macarthur on ordinances within the church. He provided some great insight into the Lord’s supper and how it was tied into the Passover meal, as well as some key texts on the frequency of this memorial and how the church should view this event. The section on baptism was equally helpful and a good refresher on the mandate to “make disciples of all nations, baptizing them…” (Matt 28:19). Finally, the question and answer portion, which was a transcript from a live chapel session, raised some important issues to which pastors must be made aware. Macarthur answers these questions being backed by 36 years of experience, and sheds some light on a variety of issues pertinent to the work of the ministry. Overall, a very helpful book that will be useful to many men who are either in the ministry already, or those who are possibly considering the call.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Brian

    The subtitle of this work is "How to Shepherd Biblically," which is well-fitting to the purpose and content. MacArthur and the men of the Seminary address various issues of ministry ranging from the Lord's Table to staff meetings, from discipleship to pastoral relationships, and from preaching to worship. The book is divided into four sections with an average of 4-5 chapters per section: I. Biblical Perspectives II. Preparatory Perspectives III. Personal Perspectives IV. Pastoral Perspectives Each ch The subtitle of this work is "How to Shepherd Biblically," which is well-fitting to the purpose and content. MacArthur and the men of the Seminary address various issues of ministry ranging from the Lord's Table to staff meetings, from discipleship to pastoral relationships, and from preaching to worship. The book is divided into four sections with an average of 4-5 chapters per section: I. Biblical Perspectives II. Preparatory Perspectives III. Personal Perspectives IV. Pastoral Perspectives Each chapter begins with biblical data and a theological framework on the topic being addressed followed by practical application. A sampling of statements from the opening chapter, entitled "Rediscovering Pastoral Ministry," gives a flavor of the thrust of the book: "The real contrast in competing ministry models is not the traditional versus the contemporary, but rather the scriptural compared to the unscriptural" (4). Mayhue argues that the right approach to ministry is "a redemptively centered, God-focused, biblically defined, and scripturally prioritized ministry" (4). "The statements of this chapter are not a call for a user-friendly church, a culturally ignorant church, or a seeker insensitive church. We have no desire to 'unchurch the unchurched' or to promote an irrelevant dinosaur of a church. On the other hand, neither do we want to substitute the latest theories in sociology and psychology for the truth of theology. We do not want to confuse the common sense benefit of demographic statistics and analysis of culture with the far more important understanding of God's will for the church, both for Christians and non-Christians. We ardently desire to let the important consideration of God and His revealed will in Scripture be the major focus" (13). The only drawback of the book is that it is written by eleven men. That becomes clear about a quarter of the way through the book. There lacks a cohesiveness throughout due to the various and differing thoughts/ideas of the authors. Often the men would contradict each other or would repeat an idea in a strinkingly similar phrase as another author. If you can put that weakness aside (which was difficult for me to do), you men will find it a good read overall.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Patrick S.

    I am usually a fan of most of MacArthur's writings (this one is a collaboration with other authors as well) but this was the book where I most disagreed with the writings or was left with a lot more questions. First of all, this book is a decent book for those looking to go into ministry. It is not really good enough for a current pastor or someone a bit more mature than college-age. It's a good introduction book and covers the needed points for holding the office of pastor. This book is very unde I am usually a fan of most of MacArthur's writings (this one is a collaboration with other authors as well) but this was the book where I most disagreed with the writings or was left with a lot more questions. First of all, this book is a decent book for those looking to go into ministry. It is not really good enough for a current pastor or someone a bit more mature than college-age. It's a good introduction book and covers the needed points for holding the office of pastor. This book is very underwhelming. For a book with MacArthur's name attached to it I expected a lot more out of it. For example, when on the two chapters on prayer there are claims made to the fact of "pray for God's provision when deciding to undertake a project. Yes, very true. But there is no "and then"! And then, try and do it and see if you fail? How long do you wait for answer? Do you listen for a voice, a feeling, a "coincidental" contact from someone? Pray for God's provision when making a decision. Agreed! But if you're in a church meeting, do you wait? Make a decision that doesn't seem like sin? Bring it up only to come back in a month to see if prayer was answered? Would have loved to have some examples. Another big area that seemed very odd was when MacArthur pretty much states that if you were chosen for ministry God would bless you by ensuring your kids would be saved. A previous chapter talked about making sure you were indeed called to the ministry and not just something you want to do. A logical conclusion is that if you become a preacher and honestly felt God's calling but your kids didn't end up being saved than you were never called and your ministry work was in vain. Again, some claims are made and Scripture is given but these questions that arise naturally from these claims go unattended. I came away from this book thinking that while the parts talked about were good and there wasn't too much in disagreement, some questions weren't covered or answered at all and generalizations were made too easily and quickly. A very disappointing read and now I have a few more questions as a result of a MacArthur book rather than answers. Final Grade - C

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brendyn

    I'm a Church of Christ Minister, and so for those of you who know the differences in my theology and John MacArthur's we have the potential to disagree with things like what Baptism means. Even so, this book was a great study to read and understand my calling. It did speak against Catholicism (the truth) regarding infant baptism. If you are just starting in ministry (as I am) or seasoned in the ministry, this is a great book to study to gain different views and wisdom from others in being the un I'm a Church of Christ Minister, and so for those of you who know the differences in my theology and John MacArthur's we have the potential to disagree with things like what Baptism means. Even so, this book was a great study to read and understand my calling. It did speak against Catholicism (the truth) regarding infant baptism. If you are just starting in ministry (as I am) or seasoned in the ministry, this is a great book to study to gain different views and wisdom from others in being the under shepherd for the Great Shepherd.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Micah Lugg

    Good resource for . . . well, pastoral ministry. Nothing too ground breaking. Because of the assortment of contributors, the book repeated itself in several places and it did not have a compelling flow. Surprisingly, it did not have a chapter on biblical counseling. I believe this weakens the argument for counseling in the church. By the admission, the authors are sending the message that it is not a part of the pastoral responsibilities.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    I don't agree with every perspective of every contributor, but this should be mandatory reading for anyone considering pastoral ministry or eldership within the Church. It was comprehensive, brutally honest, and in ten years of ministry experience I've found the contributors had a realistic assessment of the dangers, hardships, and blessings of serving Christ's church. I don't agree with every perspective of every contributor, but this should be mandatory reading for anyone considering pastoral ministry or eldership within the Church. It was comprehensive, brutally honest, and in ten years of ministry experience I've found the contributors had a realistic assessment of the dangers, hardships, and blessings of serving Christ's church.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lacedric Williams

    I suggest this book to every Pastor or inspiring Pastor. This is a great book on Pastoral Leadership. God has called us to feed the sheep. This books walk you through the expectations and some best practices to accomplish this.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Hamblin

    Nothing earth-shattering but a great reminder of what the bible says those in ministry are to be and do. Especially strong were the chapters on pastoral ministry in history, the call to ministry, and the chapter on leading. Recommend for any current or potential pastor or elder.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    0575

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    Loved this book! There were one or two chapters that were a tad boring however. Those were not written by Macarthur.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Wesley Kavanagh

    Great resource for pastors.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Sean McGowan

    Good book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    I can not believe I read all of this book except the last chapter and then let it sit on my shelf for over a year. It is a valuable resource for Pastors.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tim Senter

    Good read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dr. Z

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dustin

  23. 5 out of 5

    James Payton

  24. 5 out of 5

    David

  25. 4 out of 5

    Opoku Tevin

  26. 4 out of 5

    Trevin Ascher

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  28. 4 out of 5

    D Joseph

  29. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kristopher

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