website statistics Herman Melville and the American Calling: The Fiction After Moby-Dick, 1851-1857 - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Herman Melville and the American Calling: The Fiction After Moby-Dick, 1851-1857

Availability: Ready to download

Oriented by the new Americanist perspective, this book constitutes a rereading of Herman Melville's most prominent fiction after Moby-Dick. In contrast to prior readings of this fiction, William V. Spanos's interpretation takes as its point of departure the theme of spectrality precipitated by the metaphor of orphanage--disaffiliation from the symbolic fatherland, on the o Oriented by the new Americanist perspective, this book constitutes a rereading of Herman Melville's most prominent fiction after Moby-Dick. In contrast to prior readings of this fiction, William V. Spanos's interpretation takes as its point of departure the theme of spectrality precipitated by the metaphor of orphanage--disaffiliation from the symbolic fatherland, on the one hand, and the myth of American exceptionalism on the other--that emerged as an abiding motif in Melville's creative imagination. This book voices an original argument about Melville's status as an "American" writer, and foregrounds Melville's remarkable anticipation and critique of the exceptionalism that continues to drive American policy in the post-9/11 era.


Compare

Oriented by the new Americanist perspective, this book constitutes a rereading of Herman Melville's most prominent fiction after Moby-Dick. In contrast to prior readings of this fiction, William V. Spanos's interpretation takes as its point of departure the theme of spectrality precipitated by the metaphor of orphanage--disaffiliation from the symbolic fatherland, on the o Oriented by the new Americanist perspective, this book constitutes a rereading of Herman Melville's most prominent fiction after Moby-Dick. In contrast to prior readings of this fiction, William V. Spanos's interpretation takes as its point of departure the theme of spectrality precipitated by the metaphor of orphanage--disaffiliation from the symbolic fatherland, on the one hand, and the myth of American exceptionalism on the other--that emerged as an abiding motif in Melville's creative imagination. This book voices an original argument about Melville's status as an "American" writer, and foregrounds Melville's remarkable anticipation and critique of the exceptionalism that continues to drive American policy in the post-9/11 era.

22 review for Herman Melville and the American Calling: The Fiction After Moby-Dick, 1851-1857

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ann Marie

  2. 5 out of 5

    Edward Sargisson

  3. 4 out of 5

    Paolo

  4. 5 out of 5

    Moira Russell

  5. 4 out of 5

    Hugh

  6. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

  7. 5 out of 5

    Christoph

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Poeppel

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ross Pusey

  10. 4 out of 5

    Taylor

  11. 5 out of 5

    Benjy

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chris

  13. 5 out of 5

    John Millard

  14. 4 out of 5

    Lee Stewart

  15. 4 out of 5

    Ayman Fadel

  16. 5 out of 5

    LPenting

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kusaimamekirai

  18. 4 out of 5

    mark mendoza

  19. 4 out of 5

    George

  20. 5 out of 5

    Hamis Juma

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn Sheehan

  22. 4 out of 5

    Phiip J

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.