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Green Days by the River (Caribbean Writers Series)

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A novel about a boy on the edge of adult responsibilities, this is the story of Shell - a Trinidadian boy wtho moves to a new village and meets two girls.


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A novel about a boy on the edge of adult responsibilities, this is the story of Shell - a Trinidadian boy wtho moves to a new village and meets two girls.

30 review for Green Days by the River (Caribbean Writers Series)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nalini

    I read this book as a part of my Literature class, and I loved every minute I spent with it. The book casts an enlightening spin on a story so enthralling, you have to read it again, and again and again. Its a 5 star simply for being a Caribbean book that I loved :p

  2. 4 out of 5

    BookOfCinz

    With the impending release of the movie, "Greens Days by the River" I decided to re-read the book, seeing that I completely forgot exactly what happened. I am happy I took the time I re-read this book, having read it 15years go, most if not all of the book felt completely new. The first time I did read the book I remembered being curious about the country Trinidad and Tobago- where the novel is set. Fast forward to 2018 and I am living in said country. When you are living in a country where the With the impending release of the movie, "Greens Days by the River" I decided to re-read the book, seeing that I completely forgot exactly what happened. I am happy I took the time I re-read this book, having read it 15years go, most if not all of the book felt completely new. The first time I did read the book I remembered being curious about the country Trinidad and Tobago- where the novel is set. Fast forward to 2018 and I am living in said country. When you are living in a country where the book you're reading is set, it is an entirely different experience- for me, a good one. Michael Anthony captures the life of a teenager growing up in Mayaro and I absolutely could not get enough. Looking forward to seeing the movie.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kim M-M

    Set in Trinidad, he describes in sweet details, about life in the island. The plot revolves around a boy who falls in love with a popular girl and all the drama it entails. It follows him through some years as he grows into early adulthood, and his experiences of being young, loss, and love... and of course blackmail :) An enjoyable book though nothing seems to turn out quite right.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chiv

    Recently reread this book and I just loved it even more. This was one of my favorite school assigned books. I'm so happy I read this book. Intriguing plot and I love the symbolism in the book :) Recently reread this book and I just loved it even more. This was one of my favorite school assigned books. I'm so happy I read this book. Intriguing plot and I love the symbolism in the book :)

  5. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Gamboa

    This is my second and last book that I will ever read by Michael Anthony. In the last couple of years, I've taken an interest in Caribbean literature. While looking up books by Trinidadian authors, I found Michael Anthony, whose novels are highly regarded. However, I have noticed that the great reviews come from people who read him years ago while they were in school, so they are more like "nostalgic memories" rather than "factual reviews". I started off with "The Year In San Fernando", which, w This is my second and last book that I will ever read by Michael Anthony. In the last couple of years, I've taken an interest in Caribbean literature. While looking up books by Trinidadian authors, I found Michael Anthony, whose novels are highly regarded. However, I have noticed that the great reviews come from people who read him years ago while they were in school, so they are more like "nostalgic memories" rather than "factual reviews". I started off with "The Year In San Fernando", which, while it's an interesting look at city life through the eyes of a country boy, I thought the writing style was rather monotonous. It's a good book with two stories juxtaposed along, where the sense of place and Trinidadian life come alive on every page. Like I said, I didn't really like the writing style, and the overuse of the word "strange", but it motivated me to give another one of his books a try: "Green Days By the River". The writing style in "Green Days By the River" is definitely more engaging and flowing than in "The Year In San Fernando". Again, the word "strange" is used very often, which for me is very vague because it could mean anything, but I found myself reading chapter after chapter without even noticing. My respect for Mr. Anthony and his skill at giving a sense of place and Trinidadian culture. This time, the story is set in Mayaro, and Mr. Anthony's description of "the bush" takes you right there among the fruit trees, the birds and the Ortoire river. A chapter that I really enjoyed was the one about Shell's last experience with the Tobago dogs, where the tension and apprehension are built up very skillfully. However, my problem with this book is that, while parts of the story are very detailed, other parts are completely omitted. While planting vegetables and drinking, to name a couple, receive great attention, other moments in Shell's life, which are crucial, are almost completely ignored. Why is that? At some point, I thought that I had missed reading some chapters because it's assumed that we, the readers, know about this. I would have liked to know about those moments previous and after becoming a man; about what he went through with his father, whom he considered his "chum" and with whom he had a very open and meaningful relationship, and how he and his mother faced this crucial event in their lives. I didn't like the way the ending was plotted. The Shell we thought we knew turned out to be a whole different person. Sure, this can happen in real life, but, again, why is this character evolution being omitted from the story? All in all, I wouldn't say it's a bad book and. Again, I consider that it is worth being read just for the descriptions of town life and the bush alone. However, the plot goes from trite –this is another coming of age story– to uneven.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cindy McKenzie

    I read this book in school in 80s and I loved it. I used to long for Literature class so I can lime between the pages with Shellie and Rosalie. It's a book I will have to reread. It's been years! I read this book in school in 80s and I loved it. I used to long for Literature class so I can lime between the pages with Shellie and Rosalie. It's a book I will have to reread. It's been years!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dania

    I want to read the book

  8. 5 out of 5

    Mike Steven

    Not really one for me. I read it because it's a potential text to be studied on the GCSE English Literature paper and I've marked it for years but this is the first time anyone had bothered to answer questions on it - usually people select the far superior 'Of Mice and Men'. Nevertheless, I bought it and read it so I would be fully informed when marking scripts and I have to say that the novel was persistently disappointing throughout. The author uses the technique of 'omission' (or so the candid Not really one for me. I read it because it's a potential text to be studied on the GCSE English Literature paper and I've marked it for years but this is the first time anyone had bothered to answer questions on it - usually people select the far superior 'Of Mice and Men'. Nevertheless, I bought it and read it so I would be fully informed when marking scripts and I have to say that the novel was persistently disappointing throughout. The author uses the technique of 'omission' (or so the candidates tell me) - which basically means he doesn't write about the best bits. The plot basically centres around a year in the life of a fifteen year old boy - although he doesn't seem to have a birthday in this time. He goes through all the basic coming of age moments - he can't decide which girl he fancies most, he gets a job, he stops throwing stones at cashews, his Dad becomes ill and he becomes the man of the house, he loses his virginity, he gets drunk, he buys some long trousers - and yet with all of these things going on Anthony never actually describes anything of any interest until the final three chapters when the father of one of his girls gets even. Maybe it's deliberate. Maybe the candidates are correct and Anthony is cleverly using 'omission'. Maybe by not describing the key events the writer is making some kind of point. However, for me, it was a little frustrating and just seemed like he built up tension towards an event and then missed out the best bits. I've given it two stars on the basis that I can appreciate that, as a piece of literature and as a representation of a culture, it does have some worth. It's not one I'd read for fun though.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Salazar

    Green Days By The River was a great coming of age story. The characters seemed very similar to how boys and girls would be at that time; enjoying simple country life but still being guided by their hormone. I love a good twist, and that certainly happened at the end of the book, in two of Shell's major relationships. Poor Shell was blindsided. His attitude after everything was arranged was a little strange to me; however, I understood he was not thinking of himself. Green Days By The River was a great coming of age story. The characters seemed very similar to how boys and girls would be at that time; enjoying simple country life but still being guided by their hormone. I love a good twist, and that certainly happened at the end of the book, in two of Shell's major relationships. Poor Shell was blindsided. His attitude after everything was arranged was a little strange to me; however, I understood he was not thinking of himself.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Ramona Chanderballi

    I read this book in high school and it's one of those coming of age stories that you don't quite appreciate till in your late teens.For the most part,the writing is comforting and relatable(I'm from the Caribbean) but loses you in some parts. The morals are strong and thought provoking. It's as if you're looking into the lives of your grandparents or parents as they faced tough decisions about love and the life they hoped to lead one day. I read this book in high school and it's one of those coming of age stories that you don't quite appreciate till in your late teens.For the most part,the writing is comforting and relatable(I'm from the Caribbean) but loses you in some parts. The morals are strong and thought provoking. It's as if you're looking into the lives of your grandparents or parents as they faced tough decisions about love and the life they hoped to lead one day.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Devon

    I read this book when I was very young, and re-read as a teenager, with vastly different interpretations. Any teenager can relate to the experiences of Shell, as he moves into early adulthood. This book also showcases some of the rural aspects of Trinidad, which most people never see.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Freeman

    you have to read this book. It's wonderful and the author had a sense of Caribbean description. you have to read this book. It's wonderful and the author had a sense of Caribbean description.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Dale Allan

    It really gives you the nostalgia feel of old Trinidad.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Coraline

    high school was more tollerable with this as a literature book

  15. 5 out of 5

    Breanne Mc Ivor

    I read one of the original copies of this book, printed in 1967!!! And it is also a classic of Trinidadian literature. Many Trinis read this book in school but I never read it... until I had to interview the author after the movie came out. I scrambled to borrow this book and your girl read it in one night because the prose just flows. Our narrator is Shellie, a Trini boy who moves with his parents to a new village and there meets two girls. One is Rosalie Ghidaree, whose father lets Shellie help o I read one of the original copies of this book, printed in 1967!!! And it is also a classic of Trinidadian literature. Many Trinis read this book in school but I never read it... until I had to interview the author after the movie came out. I scrambled to borrow this book and your girl read it in one night because the prose just flows. Our narrator is Shellie, a Trini boy who moves with his parents to a new village and there meets two girls. One is Rosalie Ghidaree, whose father lets Shellie help on his land down by the river. But while Shellie is tacitly accepted as a potential husband for Rosalie, he is also attracted to the cheerful and more accessible Joan. Meanwhile, Shellie's father becomes very sick. And poor Shell must confront these crises as he begins to understand adult responsibilities. The author really steps back and lets Shell do all the talking. Issues like race relations in Trinidad or sexual discovery are simply presented from his perspective. The author trusts us enough to come to our own conclusions and doesn't feel the need to beat us over the head by saying AND THE POINT OF THIS STORY IS... "As I waited for the bus to come I slowly grew possessed by the thoughts of Joan. Joan meant Sangre Grande to me and Sangre Grande meant Joan. I kept thinking of her as she had been on Discovery Day. I was seeing her exactly as she looked then, with the ribbon in her hair, and with the blue silky dress - with the waist pulled in tightly because she was fat. She was not fat, really, but a little plump and, girls were always trying to make their waists look as slim as possible." Fun fact that I learnt when interviewing the author: his schoolmaster once said of Michael and another student as they were preparing to take an exam, "These are my dullest boys. Boys - if you pass, I will pass through a keyhole." The schoolmaster never passed through a keyhole but Michael Anthony did pass and go on to be one of T&T's most recognizable writers.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Neelam Babul

    A remarkably engaging book about Shell, a young boy who has to grow into a man bearing the responsibility of earning a living and casting aside his dreams to support his mother in looking after had s sick father. Along with this, he also experiences love and attraction to two beautiful girls. The sweet innocent love presented in the book will tug at your heart and Shell's journey will most definitely carve a special place within your heart. A remarkably engaging book about Shell, a young boy who has to grow into a man bearing the responsibility of earning a living and casting aside his dreams to support his mother in looking after had s sick father. Along with this, he also experiences love and attraction to two beautiful girls. The sweet innocent love presented in the book will tug at your heart and Shell's journey will most definitely carve a special place within your heart.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Khadine

    Green Days is a lovely coming of age tale A wonderful story with a surprise towards the end. Anthony is a skillful writer and I read every page with glee as I imagined where Shell's "adventures" would lead him. I definitely recommend. Only about 220 pages long and a great summer read Green Days is a lovely coming of age tale A wonderful story with a surprise towards the end. Anthony is a skillful writer and I read every page with glee as I imagined where Shell's "adventures" would lead him. I definitely recommend. Only about 220 pages long and a great summer read

  18. 4 out of 5

    Dwight Phoenix

    Yes. I am one for Nostalgia. This book is among the many that lead me to want to be an author. I loved how it drew me in and came alive, setting my imagination ablaze. The teenage crushes and love tales brought me back. The unfortunate events also gave that splash of reality, adding more life to the emotional fiction. As I said, it's all memory for me. I am a little biased here. Yes. I am one for Nostalgia. This book is among the many that lead me to want to be an author. I loved how it drew me in and came alive, setting my imagination ablaze. The teenage crushes and love tales brought me back. The unfortunate events also gave that splash of reality, adding more life to the emotional fiction. As I said, it's all memory for me. I am a little biased here.

  19. 4 out of 5

    R.A. Bentinck

    Read this in 1990 as part of my reading for CXC literature and I love love love it. The storyline lit up my teenage imagination

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sherylann Joseph

    👍 It was a great read. First book like this I have read and would love a part two to it.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Darcy Hoover

    A charming and innocent story that carries me back to the days of my youth. Living in Trinidad and Tobago now, I identify with the scenery and cultures that this tale portrays.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Aurora Gayle

    A beautiful Caribbean story about young love! A must read!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Liam Jones

    I still have this book. I am going to read it again!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Dandre Johnson

    It so exciting

  25. 5 out of 5

    Naomi bailey

    Really nice book

  26. 5 out of 5

    JayJackson

    Best book ever. My imagination ran wild on this one.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Julia Alfred

    Lovely read.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kayla Sorzano

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Good book

  29. 4 out of 5

    Glen Philip

    Excellent Read Read this book in secondary school(2000) and again in 2020.Love it.Will get a copy for my son. As a Caribbean girl I can relate a lot to this story.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jamoy

    I love this book

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