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Can television shows like Desperate Housewives, popular songs like Shaggy′s It Wasn′t Me, advertisements for Samuel Adams beer, and films such as Harry Potter help us understand rhetorical theory and criticism? The Rhetorical Power of Popular Culture is chock full of familiar examples like these to make rhetorical theory and criticism accessible, relevant, and meaningful t Can television shows like Desperate Housewives, popular songs like Shaggy′s It Wasn′t Me, advertisements for Samuel Adams beer, and films such as Harry Potter help us understand rhetorical theory and criticism? The Rhetorical Power of Popular Culture is chock full of familiar examples like these to make rhetorical theory and criticism accessible, relevant, and meaningful to readers. Author Deanna Sellnow offers a step-by-step introduction to rhetorical theory and criticism by focusing on the powerful roles TV programs, advertisements, music, comics, and movies play in persuading us on what to believe and how to behave. Key Features Clarifies theoretical concepts using a broad range of familiar examples from TV, film, music, advertisements, and comics Proposes a consistent step-by-step approach to conducting a rhetorical analysis of popular culture texts focused on describing, interpreting, and evaluating Engages readers in the hands-on process of popular cultural criticism with end-of-chapter sample essays and challenge exercises Fosters critical thinking and retention of key concepts by encouraging readers to actively apply concepts through Applying What You′ve Learned boxes embedded in each chapter Intended Audience This pragmatic book makes an excellent text for courses exploring the intersections of popular culture, communication, sociology, and identity. It is a must-have for anyone interested in examining the powerfully persuasive rhetorical messages that pervade our daily lives.


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Can television shows like Desperate Housewives, popular songs like Shaggy′s It Wasn′t Me, advertisements for Samuel Adams beer, and films such as Harry Potter help us understand rhetorical theory and criticism? The Rhetorical Power of Popular Culture is chock full of familiar examples like these to make rhetorical theory and criticism accessible, relevant, and meaningful t Can television shows like Desperate Housewives, popular songs like Shaggy′s It Wasn′t Me, advertisements for Samuel Adams beer, and films such as Harry Potter help us understand rhetorical theory and criticism? The Rhetorical Power of Popular Culture is chock full of familiar examples like these to make rhetorical theory and criticism accessible, relevant, and meaningful to readers. Author Deanna Sellnow offers a step-by-step introduction to rhetorical theory and criticism by focusing on the powerful roles TV programs, advertisements, music, comics, and movies play in persuading us on what to believe and how to behave. Key Features Clarifies theoretical concepts using a broad range of familiar examples from TV, film, music, advertisements, and comics Proposes a consistent step-by-step approach to conducting a rhetorical analysis of popular culture texts focused on describing, interpreting, and evaluating Engages readers in the hands-on process of popular cultural criticism with end-of-chapter sample essays and challenge exercises Fosters critical thinking and retention of key concepts by encouraging readers to actively apply concepts through Applying What You′ve Learned boxes embedded in each chapter Intended Audience This pragmatic book makes an excellent text for courses exploring the intersections of popular culture, communication, sociology, and identity. It is a must-have for anyone interested in examining the powerfully persuasive rhetorical messages that pervade our daily lives.

30 review for The Rhetorical Power of Popular Culture: Considering Mediated Texts

  1. 5 out of 5

    Erika

    Pretty good book with detailed descriptions. It had some flaws in the feminism chapter with the word choice and explanations. I feel like that needs to be updated or adjusted so that it doesn't sound so political. Pretty good book with detailed descriptions. It had some flaws in the feminism chapter with the word choice and explanations. I feel like that needs to be updated or adjusted so that it doesn't sound so political.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Monica (is working the heck out of

    In the Rhetorical Power of Popular Culture: Considering Mediated Texts, author Deanna D. Sellnow posits a, not entirely new but nonetheless, important theory of the text, one that admits the nontraditional text to the arena of analysis, rhetoric and argumentation. The book examines the messages and controversies that, in “mediated texts,” or “the everyday objects, actions, and events we experience through a media channel (e.g., movies, TV programs, songs, comic strips, advertisements), may influ In the Rhetorical Power of Popular Culture: Considering Mediated Texts, author Deanna D. Sellnow posits a, not entirely new but nonetheless, important theory of the text, one that admits the nontraditional text to the arena of analysis, rhetoric and argumentation. The book examines the messages and controversies that, in “mediated texts,” or “the everyday objects, actions, and events we experience through a media channel (e.g., movies, TV programs, songs, comic strips, advertisements), may influence us to believe and behave in certain ways” (n.pg). “Mediated popular culture texts,” she explains, “communicate to and for us regarding what we believe we ought to and ought not to believe and do during every waking moment” (n.pg). Explicit in her explication of the “mediated text” (n.pg) is the notion that the text, as it has traditionally been defined, is not and should not be regarded as the most important site and source of meaning. Non-traditional texts should not be precluded from the classroom but subjected to traditional modes of analysis and evaluation. Critics of non-traditional texts in the writing class assert that such readings neither facilitate the teaching of college writing nor provide students with sufficient models of rhetoric and argumentation. More importantly, such texts negate the cognitive processes and intellectual engagement that traditional texts demand. This source supports my contention that non-traditional texts can and should function alongside thesis-based articles in the writing class. Sellnow’s assertion that nontraditional, "mediated popular culture texts” (n.pg) generate ongoing, critical conversations and require of "readers" a different but, nonetheless, academically significant mode of critical thinking and rhetorical analysis. Sellnow’s contribution to conversations about what constitutes rhetoric are essential to this project. Her discussion of the rhetorical power that inheres in formative, non-traditional units of discourse explicitly challenges traditional definitions of appropriate reading. The author defines and explicates various rhetorical lenses through which students can analyze and critique a text, effectively invalidating the notion that only nonfictional and thesis-based texts are emblematic of rhetorical significance and worthy of analysis and critique.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ebony

    This is a lovely textbook. With the exception of TMI from Sellnow's private life, it's accessible and interesting. It's probably a better text than Foss for teaching rhet crit because it's so applicable to everyday undergraduate lives. Even I learned something, but I would not assign the sample essays. They are super unsophisticated. I wouldn't want my students to read them and think I had lowered my expectations. This is a lovely textbook. With the exception of TMI from Sellnow's private life, it's accessible and interesting. It's probably a better text than Foss for teaching rhet crit because it's so applicable to everyday undergraduate lives. Even I learned something, but I would not assign the sample essays. They are super unsophisticated. I wouldn't want my students to read them and think I had lowered my expectations.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Miranda

    WGS 255: Gender & Pop Culture

  5. 4 out of 5

    Pre Stanley

  6. 4 out of 5

    Vicki

  7. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

  8. 4 out of 5

    Beth Anne Finley

  9. 4 out of 5

    McKayla

  10. 4 out of 5

    Danielle Demuth

  11. 5 out of 5

    Josephine

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Mata

  14. 4 out of 5

    Brittney Martinez

  15. 5 out of 5

    Frank Ly

  16. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

  17. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Baker

  18. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kit

  20. 4 out of 5

    Amy J

  21. 4 out of 5

    Kristen

  22. 4 out of 5

    S.R. Toliver

  23. 4 out of 5

    Katie Detwiler

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lloyd Romano

  25. 4 out of 5

    Janine

  26. 5 out of 5

    Elaina Richards

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bennett W.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Karolina

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ellie

  30. 4 out of 5

    I

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