website statistics Dorm Room Dealers: Drugs And The Privileges Of Race And Class - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Dorm Room Dealers: Drugs And The Privileges Of Race And Class

Availability: Ready to download

Why do affluent, upwardly mobile college students - who have everything to lose and little to gain - choose to sell drugs? Why do law enforcement officers largely overlook drug dealing on college campuses? With rich, lively details, A. Rafik Mohamed and Erik Fritsvold deliver unprecedented insight into the world of college drug dealers - and offer an important corrective t Why do affluent, upwardly mobile college students - who have everything to lose and little to gain - choose to sell drugs? Why do law enforcement officers largely overlook drug dealing on college campuses? With rich, lively details, A. Rafik Mohamed and Erik Fritsvold deliver unprecedented insight into the world of college drug dealers - and offer an important corrective to the traditional distorted view of the US drug trade as primarily involving poor minorities. Drawing on three years of fieldwork at a predominately white private university, their exceptional ethnography skillfully explores issues of deviance, race, and stratification in the US war on drugs.


Compare

Why do affluent, upwardly mobile college students - who have everything to lose and little to gain - choose to sell drugs? Why do law enforcement officers largely overlook drug dealing on college campuses? With rich, lively details, A. Rafik Mohamed and Erik Fritsvold deliver unprecedented insight into the world of college drug dealers - and offer an important corrective t Why do affluent, upwardly mobile college students - who have everything to lose and little to gain - choose to sell drugs? Why do law enforcement officers largely overlook drug dealing on college campuses? With rich, lively details, A. Rafik Mohamed and Erik Fritsvold deliver unprecedented insight into the world of college drug dealers - and offer an important corrective to the traditional distorted view of the US drug trade as primarily involving poor minorities. Drawing on three years of fieldwork at a predominately white private university, their exceptional ethnography skillfully explores issues of deviance, race, and stratification in the US war on drugs.

46 review for Dorm Room Dealers: Drugs And The Privileges Of Race And Class

  1. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

    One of the authors of this book was the professor of a college course my daughter took, and this book was one of the required readings. As mother of college kids, it looked interesting and it was. Some parts were a bit dry and repetitive. However, it raised good points about how white, middle/upper middle class college students are able to deal in high volume of marijuana and prescription drugs because they don’t fit the stereotype of a typical drug dealer, nor do they suffer the same consequenc One of the authors of this book was the professor of a college course my daughter took, and this book was one of the required readings. As mother of college kids, it looked interesting and it was. Some parts were a bit dry and repetitive. However, it raised good points about how white, middle/upper middle class college students are able to deal in high volume of marijuana and prescription drugs because they don’t fit the stereotype of a typical drug dealer, nor do they suffer the same consequences if they are, in fact, caught.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Tiny Pants

    The professor I TA'd for during the fall assigned excerpts from this, and I thought it seemed really interesting -- sadly though, I may as well have stuck with the excerpts. While I understand that with a study like this there are a lot of concerns with confidentiality and protecting subjects, this book is so thin and repetitive that I'm not clear why they bothered with the six years of ethnographic research. I mean really? You needed to spend that much time sitting around in dorm rooms and apar The professor I TA'd for during the fall assigned excerpts from this, and I thought it seemed really interesting -- sadly though, I may as well have stuck with the excerpts. While I understand that with a study like this there are a lot of concerns with confidentiality and protecting subjects, this book is so thin and repetitive that I'm not clear why they bothered with the six years of ethnographic research. I mean really? You needed to spend that much time sitting around in dorm rooms and apartments watching college kids buy pot and Adderall just, you know, for this? I really wanted some rich detail and description, and instead I got a very surface-level account of this illicit drug culture. I mean, for sure the authors do make several interesting points about the privileges of race and class that their subjects enjoy, comparing these both with statistics about drug use and incarceration in the U.S., and also with some of the literature on criminology. That said, this read like a bad dissertation draft. Clunky writing, poor copy editing, and fistfuls of sociological literature haphazardly stuck in there. I really, really wanted to like this book, but it just didn't get the job done for me.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Billy Burchfield

    This is a highly ineffective book. Those in college sheltered enough not to already know the information within will gain some interesting insights into the drug culture of the modern university, but nothing more. Most people will have already guessed many of the study's findings and will find the book extremely monotonous. This is a highly ineffective book. Those in college sheltered enough not to already know the information within will gain some interesting insights into the drug culture of the modern university, but nothing more. Most people will have already guessed many of the study's findings and will find the book extremely monotonous.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Katrina

    An interesting look at college drug dealers and the privilege that lets them off. It's an academic book, so the style is somewhat dry in places, but engaging and fascinating. An interesting look at college drug dealers and the privilege that lets them off. It's an academic book, so the style is somewhat dry in places, but engaging and fascinating.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  6. 4 out of 5

    Robert Mecchi

  7. 4 out of 5

    Austin

  8. 5 out of 5

    Denele

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey

  10. 4 out of 5

    Haley Pratt

  11. 5 out of 5

    Katy Carnell

  12. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

  14. 4 out of 5

    Reuvenc

  15. 4 out of 5

    Phoebe

  16. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jake H

  18. 5 out of 5

    Brandon Moskun

  19. 5 out of 5

    Katie

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sierra Jiminez

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lynn

  22. 5 out of 5

    Asmod Karki

  23. 4 out of 5

    Pierre Levesque

  24. 5 out of 5

    Amasa

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ross Aikins

  26. 4 out of 5

    Elias

  27. 4 out of 5

    Molly Driscoll

  28. 4 out of 5

    Mollie Sullivan

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mary

  30. 5 out of 5

    D

  31. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  32. 4 out of 5

    Mallory

  33. 4 out of 5

    Day

  34. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

  35. 4 out of 5

    arieswym

  36. 5 out of 5

    Afshan

  37. 4 out of 5

    Arjun

  38. 5 out of 5

    Cake Shorts

  39. 4 out of 5

    Sierra

  40. 4 out of 5

    Elyse

  41. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Cummings

  42. 4 out of 5

    Daniel Perez

  43. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

  44. 5 out of 5

    Brittanyrochelle

  45. 4 out of 5

    Phil French

  46. 5 out of 5

    Sam

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.