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Victoria And Disraeli: The Making Of A Romantic Partnership (Cassell Biographies)

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40 review for Victoria And Disraeli: The Making Of A Romantic Partnership (Cassell Biographies)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Quirkyreader

    This was a well written side by side biography of Benjamin Disraeli and Queen Victoria. And, with the new book about her and series on the BBC and PBS it is a perfect time to focus on the people who helped Queen Victoria get through the days without her beloved Albert. Disraeli was a dandy and writer of his time who latter developed into an elder statesman, who helped with making Victoria's realm into an empire. But we all unfortunately know what has happened with the empire and its side effects This was a well written side by side biography of Benjamin Disraeli and Queen Victoria. And, with the new book about her and series on the BBC and PBS it is a perfect time to focus on the people who helped Queen Victoria get through the days without her beloved Albert. Disraeli was a dandy and writer of his time who latter developed into an elder statesman, who helped with making Victoria's realm into an empire. But we all unfortunately know what has happened with the empire and its side effects which still resonate today. This book is a good introduction to this fascinating era of politics and monarchy of the middle and late 19th century. Hopefully this book inspires others to learn more about Disraeli and his times.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Adam Cherson

    I rate this book a 3.56 on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being best. Disraeli is another in the long list of historical figures whose conversion from Judaism is rewarded with high office. In this book we learn that Disraeli had trouble with hearty meals and eschewed dinner parties: "He could not digest the obligatory gigantic meals." There are good examples of Victoria's rhetoric: Upon being importuned to open parliament after the death of Albert she says: "The Queen must say that she feels very bitter I rate this book a 3.56 on a scale of 1 to 5 with 5 being best. Disraeli is another in the long list of historical figures whose conversion from Judaism is rewarded with high office. In this book we learn that Disraeli had trouble with hearty meals and eschewed dinner parties: "He could not digest the obligatory gigantic meals." There are good examples of Victoria's rhetoric: Upon being importuned to open parliament after the death of Albert she says: "The Queen must say that she feels very bitterly the want of feeling of those who ask the Queen to go to open Parliament...why this wish should be of so unreasonable and unfeeling a nature as to long to witness the spectacle of a poor widow, nervous and shrinking, dragged in deep mourning ALONE in STATE as a Show where she used to go supported by her husband to be gazed at, without delicacy of feeling, is a thing she cannot understand, and never could wish her bitterest foe exposed to.' There are certainly hints of the Churchill to come here. Disraeli seems to have been a wishy-washy politician at heart: “His religious beliefs, like his political, were hazy, eccentric, inconsistent... he once airily dismissed the entire controversy about Darwin's Origin of the Species by declaring that he was 'on the side of the Angels'.” An interesting early example of crony capitalism: 4,000,000 pounds to purchase minority shares of Suez Canal were loaned to Disraeli by Baron Lionel de Rothschild, who ate grapes as Montagu Corry, Disraeli's secretary, made him the proposal. Is seems that sexual politics was already being played in those days: Disraeli is supposed to have made sexual innuendos against Gladstone, his political arch-rival, surrounding the latter's activities reforming prostitutes and pornography.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Stephen R Goodman

    Fascinating and entertaining Not an impartial historical study; but certainly informative, entertaining and fascinating portrait of two powerful figures of the British empire at its peak.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Karen

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ely Cohen

  6. 4 out of 5

    marianna

  7. 5 out of 5

    Naomi Tiscione

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen Wells

  9. 5 out of 5

    One_maxwell

  10. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Adde

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lynn Smith

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rosie Richey

  13. 5 out of 5

    Maureen

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

  15. 4 out of 5

    Martin E. Weinstein

  16. 4 out of 5

    Paul Fillingim

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cindy

  18. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jake

  20. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Casey Moran

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rita L. Woods

  22. 4 out of 5

    Mandy Clark

  23. 5 out of 5

    Diane Vermette

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lynne McLawhorn

  25. 5 out of 5

    Ken Johnson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Raúl

  27. 4 out of 5

    Shawn Mooney (Shawn The Book Maniac)

  28. 5 out of 5

    Barbara (The Bibliophage)

  29. 5 out of 5

    Heidi Childers

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  31. 4 out of 5

    Ella

  32. 5 out of 5

    Carol

  33. 5 out of 5

    Sem

  34. 5 out of 5

    J

  35. 5 out of 5

    Fivewincs

  36. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

  37. 5 out of 5

    Diana

  38. 5 out of 5

    Jeannie

  39. 5 out of 5

    Shrilakhshmi

  40. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia Curran

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