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Pedagogy of Democracy: Feminism and the Cold War in the U.S. Occupation of Japan

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Pedagogy of Democracy re-interprets the U.S. occupation of Japan from 1945 to 1952 as a problematic instance of Cold War feminist mobilization rather than a successful democratization of Japanese women as previously argued. By combining or "using" three fields of research - occupation, Cold War, and postcolonial feminist studies - and examining occupation records and other Pedagogy of Democracy re-interprets the U.S. occupation of Japan from 1945 to 1952 as a problematic instance of Cold War feminist mobilization rather than a successful democratization of Japanese women as previously argued. By combining or "using" three fields of research - occupation, Cold War, and postcolonial feminist studies - and examining occupation records and other archival sources, Koikari argues that postwar gender reform was part of the Cold War containment strategies that undermined rather than promoted women's political and economic rights. Koikari suggests that American and Japanese women leaders both participated in as well as resisted the ruling dynamics of race, gender, class, sexuality, and nation. Thus, Pedagogy of Democracy sheds new light on the complex and contradictory implications of Western feminist interventions in Asia. By applying a postcolonial feminist framework to American gender reform in the Cold War Asia-Pacific context - a subject hitherto understudied among feminist scholars - Pedagogy of Democracy reveals both the similarities and the differences between imperial feminisms in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.


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Pedagogy of Democracy re-interprets the U.S. occupation of Japan from 1945 to 1952 as a problematic instance of Cold War feminist mobilization rather than a successful democratization of Japanese women as previously argued. By combining or "using" three fields of research - occupation, Cold War, and postcolonial feminist studies - and examining occupation records and other Pedagogy of Democracy re-interprets the U.S. occupation of Japan from 1945 to 1952 as a problematic instance of Cold War feminist mobilization rather than a successful democratization of Japanese women as previously argued. By combining or "using" three fields of research - occupation, Cold War, and postcolonial feminist studies - and examining occupation records and other archival sources, Koikari argues that postwar gender reform was part of the Cold War containment strategies that undermined rather than promoted women's political and economic rights. Koikari suggests that American and Japanese women leaders both participated in as well as resisted the ruling dynamics of race, gender, class, sexuality, and nation. Thus, Pedagogy of Democracy sheds new light on the complex and contradictory implications of Western feminist interventions in Asia. By applying a postcolonial feminist framework to American gender reform in the Cold War Asia-Pacific context - a subject hitherto understudied among feminist scholars - Pedagogy of Democracy reveals both the similarities and the differences between imperial feminisms in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

16 review for Pedagogy of Democracy: Feminism and the Cold War in the U.S. Occupation of Japan

  1. 5 out of 5

    machinaheart

    Interesting, intersectional and filled with topical anecdotes, Koikari paints a diverse and multifaceted picture of women in the centre of the American Occupation of Japan.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Alice Jennings

    I don't remember this book very well, but I do know I enjoyed it. I don't remember this book very well, but I do know I enjoyed it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Daigo Shima

  4. 4 out of 5

    Fredrick D.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Leo Mckenzie

  6. 5 out of 5

    Maria

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jen

  8. 4 out of 5

    Raquel

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kyle

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nadine

  11. 5 out of 5

    Cassie

  12. 4 out of 5

    kimberly partner

  13. 5 out of 5

    julia

  14. 5 out of 5

    Krzysiek (Chris)

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eskil

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kendall Williams

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