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Bloggers on the Bus: How the Internet Changed Politics and the Press

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From the author of Lapdogs comes an intriguing examination of the world of the blogosphere as a place where political journalists—and politicians—can reach out to a niche online audience that may have been turned off by traditional media channels. Following in the bestselling tradition of Timothy Crouse’s classic book The Boys on the Bus, Bloggers on the Bus explores how t From the author of Lapdogs comes an intriguing examination of the world of the blogosphere as a place where political journalists—and politicians—can reach out to a niche online audience that may have been turned off by traditional media channels. Following in the bestselling tradition of Timothy Crouse’s classic book The Boys on the Bus, Bloggers on the Bus explores how the blogosphere has revolutionized and empowered progressive political campaigning. Liberal politicking has been radically impacted by these grassroots (or "netroots") efforts, influencing the candidates and how campaigns are conducted. Using the 2008 presidential campaign as a compelling backdrop, Boehlert colors Bloggers on the Bus with character sketches of the people who are pioneering the major shift in today’s media. He describes how years before YouTube, a former pro rock saxophonist changed blogging forever by figuring out how to post television clips online. And perhaps most famously, a sixty-something Oakland housewife and Huffington Post volunteer managed to snag one of the biggest scoops of the Democratic Primary—Obama’s closed-door "bitter" comments. Engagingly written and indisputably relevant, Bloggers on the Bus studies the unprecedented coverage, heated controversy, and major innovations that have emerged out of the political blogosphere.


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From the author of Lapdogs comes an intriguing examination of the world of the blogosphere as a place where political journalists—and politicians—can reach out to a niche online audience that may have been turned off by traditional media channels. Following in the bestselling tradition of Timothy Crouse’s classic book The Boys on the Bus, Bloggers on the Bus explores how t From the author of Lapdogs comes an intriguing examination of the world of the blogosphere as a place where political journalists—and politicians—can reach out to a niche online audience that may have been turned off by traditional media channels. Following in the bestselling tradition of Timothy Crouse’s classic book The Boys on the Bus, Bloggers on the Bus explores how the blogosphere has revolutionized and empowered progressive political campaigning. Liberal politicking has been radically impacted by these grassroots (or "netroots") efforts, influencing the candidates and how campaigns are conducted. Using the 2008 presidential campaign as a compelling backdrop, Boehlert colors Bloggers on the Bus with character sketches of the people who are pioneering the major shift in today’s media. He describes how years before YouTube, a former pro rock saxophonist changed blogging forever by figuring out how to post television clips online. And perhaps most famously, a sixty-something Oakland housewife and Huffington Post volunteer managed to snag one of the biggest scoops of the Democratic Primary—Obama’s closed-door "bitter" comments. Engagingly written and indisputably relevant, Bloggers on the Bus studies the unprecedented coverage, heated controversy, and major innovations that have emerged out of the political blogosphere.

30 review for Bloggers on the Bus: How the Internet Changed Politics and the Press

  1. 5 out of 5

    Tom Bevilacqua

    As a bit of an armchair blogger, I was noticeable intrigued by this book which profiled the role of blogger and the blogosphere played in shaping politics starting in and about 2004 (if not a little bit before). Boehlert does a good job of touching on most of the primary and essential aspects of the blogosphere, as well as the biggest blogs (a great deal of attention is paid to DailyKos, and rightfully so). The most interesting, or surprising, part is the ways in which he details how Obama seeme As a bit of an armchair blogger, I was noticeable intrigued by this book which profiled the role of blogger and the blogosphere played in shaping politics starting in and about 2004 (if not a little bit before). Boehlert does a good job of touching on most of the primary and essential aspects of the blogosphere, as well as the biggest blogs (a great deal of attention is paid to DailyKos, and rightfully so). The most interesting, or surprising, part is the ways in which he details how Obama seemed to remain distant from the blogosphere while most bloggers supported him. What I think Boehlert fails to recognize is that the setup of the blogosphere doesn't require a candidate's endorsement or reaction, because that is the way it's supposed to be. Also, Boehlert chooses not to emphasize, and merely mentions it in a passing manner, that Obama did directly address bloggers by calling on a HuffingtonPost blogger at a press conference. But Boehlert definitely provides a clear and accurate portrayal of the blogosphere, its relationship to the Democratic Party and the role it plays in politics overall. If you are interested in politics and political coverage, or if you are an avid blogger or blog reader (like me), then you should give this book a read.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Pascal Lapointe

    « Rien de tout ceci ne serait arrivé sans Internet. » On a souvent entendu cette phrase depuis 15 ans, et souvent c'était très exagéré. Mais les récits que rassemble Bloggers on the Bus sont inspirants : du ti-cul de 20 ans passionné de politique qui passait ses journées devant son ordinateur jusqu’à la retraitée de 61 ans qui s’est pointée à des dizaines d’assemblées partisanes, les blogueurs de gauche -libéraux au sens US du terme, progressistes- ont joué un rôle important dans la dernière cam « Rien de tout ceci ne serait arrivé sans Internet. » On a souvent entendu cette phrase depuis 15 ans, et souvent c'était très exagéré. Mais les récits que rassemble Bloggers on the Bus sont inspirants : du ti-cul de 20 ans passionné de politique qui passait ses journées devant son ordinateur jusqu’à la retraitée de 61 ans qui s’est pointée à des dizaines d’assemblées partisanes, les blogueurs de gauche -libéraux au sens US du terme, progressistes- ont joué un rôle important dans la dernière campagne présidentielle. Bien mieux organisés que leurs comparses conservateurs, souvent vindicatifs et surtout, terriblement intelligents, les Atrios, Huffington Post, Firedoglake et autres Hullabaloo, sont allés là où les journalistes (qui suivaient la campagne depuis les autobus des candidats, d'où le titre), ne sont jamais allés. Ils ont tantôt réseauté des électeurs désabusés, tantôt embarrassé des commentateurs pontifiants de la télé. Les amateurs de politique américaine apprécieront ce livre, qui offre une photographie des coulisses qui leur avait échappé jusqu’ici.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Randy

    I've been reading the blogs for about ten years now. Have been reading some of them like Glenn Greewald since almost the beginning. This book has a lot of "inside baseball." For an avid blog reader it's a must. Good info on all my favorites. I think it would also be interesting for a non (political) blog reader. Boehlert is an engaging writer who tells the story of how progressive/liberal/left wing blogs came to prominence to rival right wing talk radio and significantly affected the 2004 and 20 I've been reading the blogs for about ten years now. Have been reading some of them like Glenn Greewald since almost the beginning. This book has a lot of "inside baseball." For an avid blog reader it's a must. Good info on all my favorites. I think it would also be interesting for a non (political) blog reader. Boehlert is an engaging writer who tells the story of how progressive/liberal/left wing blogs came to prominence to rival right wing talk radio and significantly affected the 2004 and 2008 elections. There are many interesting stories in the book. One of the most interesting tells how local bloggers vetted Sarah Palin for the rest of the country. Highly recommend.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brad

    The book was clearly written in the heat of the moment and document a movement as if it changed the world... And in some ways it did. But the whole thing feels a bit one-sided and biases, and paints incomplete pictures of the campaign, political blogosphere, and almost makes it sound like the tea party movement that followed would have been impossible. Still, there are some good stories mixed in, and as a tech blogger, it was interesting reading the tales of bloggers of a different breed.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Edward Branley

    Boehlert does a splendid job of documenting the rise of liberal bloggers as an influential part of political campaigns in this book. As an active member of the Daily Kos community (www.dailykos.com) during the "Hillary-Obama War of 2008," it was interesting to read a more dispassionate account of all the activity. With print media dying more and more daily, the emergence of bloggers and on-line reporters as celebrity writers retire and/or fade away makes for fascinating reading. Boehlert does a splendid job of documenting the rise of liberal bloggers as an influential part of political campaigns in this book. As an active member of the Daily Kos community (www.dailykos.com) during the "Hillary-Obama War of 2008," it was interesting to read a more dispassionate account of all the activity. With print media dying more and more daily, the emergence of bloggers and on-line reporters as celebrity writers retire and/or fade away makes for fascinating reading.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Greg Otto

    An interesting account on how the liberal blogosphere had its growing pains over the past decade.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sean

    A highly readable, thrilling account of the nascent netroots and its coming of age in the 2008 elections.

  8. 4 out of 5

    A.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Linda

  10. 5 out of 5

    Livia

  11. 5 out of 5

    Christopher

  12. 5 out of 5

    Richard

  13. 4 out of 5

    Micah

  14. 4 out of 5

    TEELOCK Mithilesh

  15. 4 out of 5

    Karl Frisch

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jon

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kendra Srebro

  18. 5 out of 5

    Maya

  19. 5 out of 5

    Andy Caffrey

  20. 5 out of 5

    Nick Lawton

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andrea Rosen

  22. 5 out of 5

    Barry

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ranhel

  24. 4 out of 5

    David Knopf

  25. 5 out of 5

    miranda

  26. 4 out of 5

    Frankie

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brandon

  28. 5 out of 5

    Isaac Josephson

  29. 5 out of 5

    Hayley Henriksen

  30. 5 out of 5

    Lyle Richardson

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