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Overhearing the Gospel: Preaching and Teaching the Faith to Persons Who Have Already Heard ([Lyman Beecher lectures)

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Overhearing the Gospel


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Overhearing the Gospel

30 review for Overhearing the Gospel: Preaching and Teaching the Faith to Persons Who Have Already Heard ([Lyman Beecher lectures)

  1. 4 out of 5

    John Majors

    Craddock analyzes Kierkegaard's approach to communication: indirect vs. direct speech. Kierkegaard believed indirect to be the best (such were parables and narratives and even Jesus' very appearance on earth - God in human flesh is an indirect way for God to approach) - yet it requires much wisdom. So much to like and admire in this book. Would have given it a 5/5 if it weren't for the last few chapters - his actual sermon examples of his attempt to illustrate these principles were a complete bor Craddock analyzes Kierkegaard's approach to communication: indirect vs. direct speech. Kierkegaard believed indirect to be the best (such were parables and narratives and even Jesus' very appearance on earth - God in human flesh is an indirect way for God to approach) - yet it requires much wisdom. So much to like and admire in this book. Would have given it a 5/5 if it weren't for the last few chapters - his actual sermon examples of his attempt to illustrate these principles were a complete bore. Which makes sense after reading the rest of the book (Craddock predicted they would be). It's a short read worth taking the time to pick up.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Ron

    While this book is about preaching, it also has lots of practical advice on your day to day life. The author clearly loves Soren Kierkegaard and has numerous references to him and bases the book off of Kierkegaard quote: There is no lack of information in a Christian land; something else is lacking, and this is something which the one cannot directly communicate to the other. To do the book justice, you should read it. One of the premises is that people don't want to be preached at (to) but should While this book is about preaching, it also has lots of practical advice on your day to day life. The author clearly loves Soren Kierkegaard and has numerous references to him and bases the book off of Kierkegaard quote: There is no lack of information in a Christian land; something else is lacking, and this is something which the one cannot directly communicate to the other. To do the book justice, you should read it. One of the premises is that people don't want to be preached at (to) but should be interested in hearing your stories and get caught up. This is similar to Jesus and the parables. The thought is that people should "overhear" your sermon (life) as you are talking to God rather than preaching to them. The book ends with three sermons. The one on the Rich Man and Lazarus is definitely worth a read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Steve Long

    When I finished this immensely helpful book, I decided that this is one to read every year. I love both the preaching and writing of the late Fred Craddock.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Henry Sturcke

    Even though it's a few decades old, well worth reading, since his diagnosis is unfortunately still accurate and his prescription helpful. I was fascinated by the way he interacted with Kierkegaard in his analysis, which revised my opinion of the gloomy Dane. One drawback: I was not able to access the endnotes via the hyperlinks. This feature seems to work in other Kindle books, so perhaps this is a problem with the coding of the electronic file. [review first posted on Amazon.com] Even though it's a few decades old, well worth reading, since his diagnosis is unfortunately still accurate and his prescription helpful. I was fascinated by the way he interacted with Kierkegaard in his analysis, which revised my opinion of the gloomy Dane. One drawback: I was not able to access the endnotes via the hyperlinks. This feature seems to work in other Kindle books, so perhaps this is a problem with the coding of the electronic file. [review first posted on Amazon.com]

  5. 4 out of 5

    Seth Pierce

    An exceptional, and challenging, read applying Kierkegaard's concept of indirect communication to homiletics. Well worth a couple reads. The only shortfall is when he gives you three of his sermon mss to illustrate the concepts he breaks a few rules he encourages the reader to follow, and his outlines along with mss would be been more helpful. Goof stuff. An exceptional, and challenging, read applying Kierkegaard's concept of indirect communication to homiletics. Well worth a couple reads. The only shortfall is when he gives you three of his sermon mss to illustrate the concepts he breaks a few rules he encourages the reader to follow, and his outlines along with mss would be been more helpful. Goof stuff.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Doug

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kent Little

  8. 5 out of 5

    Steve Farson

  9. 4 out of 5

    Albert

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Wallace

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rob

  12. 4 out of 5

    John Collings

  13. 5 out of 5

    Henry

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jessica

  15. 5 out of 5

    Glen

  16. 4 out of 5

    Zach Hollifield

  17. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Attwood

  18. 5 out of 5

    Marie Mallory

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tim Marks

  20. 4 out of 5

    Troy Borst

  21. 5 out of 5

    Bob

  22. 4 out of 5

    Lorine Hopkins

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mark Adams

  24. 4 out of 5

    Elizabeth Hornsby

  25. 5 out of 5

    J.T.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pastor Matt

  28. 5 out of 5

    Brian Hughes

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michael

  30. 4 out of 5

    Larry

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