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Spider-Man Noir

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With great power, there must also come great responsibility - and when those in power abuse it, it's the people's responsibility to remove them. The year is 1933, and New York City is not-so-secretly run by corrupt politicians, crooked cops, big businesses... and suave gangland bosses like New York's worst, the Goblin. But when a fateful spider-bite gives the young rabble- With great power, there must also come great responsibility - and when those in power abuse it, it's the people's responsibility to remove them. The year is 1933, and New York City is not-so-secretly run by corrupt politicians, crooked cops, big businesses... and suave gangland bosses like New York's worst, the Goblin. But when a fateful spider-bite gives the young rabble-rouser Peter Parker the power to fight the mobster who killed his Uncle Ben, will even that be enough? It's a tangled web of Great Depression pulp, with familiar faces like you've never seen them before! By "Hardboiled" David Hine, Fabrice "The Spider" Sapolsky, and Carmine "Carbine" Di Giandomenico! Collects Spider-Man Noir #1-4.


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With great power, there must also come great responsibility - and when those in power abuse it, it's the people's responsibility to remove them. The year is 1933, and New York City is not-so-secretly run by corrupt politicians, crooked cops, big businesses... and suave gangland bosses like New York's worst, the Goblin. But when a fateful spider-bite gives the young rabble- With great power, there must also come great responsibility - and when those in power abuse it, it's the people's responsibility to remove them. The year is 1933, and New York City is not-so-secretly run by corrupt politicians, crooked cops, big businesses... and suave gangland bosses like New York's worst, the Goblin. But when a fateful spider-bite gives the young rabble-rouser Peter Parker the power to fight the mobster who killed his Uncle Ben, will even that be enough? It's a tangled web of Great Depression pulp, with familiar faces like you've never seen them before! By "Hardboiled" David Hine, Fabrice "The Spider" Sapolsky, and Carmine "Carbine" Di Giandomenico! Collects Spider-Man Noir #1-4.

30 review for Spider-Man Noir

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Ever since I saw Spider-Man Noir in the Spiderverse movie I was like... OMG I have to read up on ALL of them. It wasn't a hard decision and I certainly don't regret it. It's the middle of the Great Depression and the ugly streets are just getting uglier. Familiar names have different backstories and it all fits nicely into a gun-toting, corrupt city of nasty sorts and bleeding hearts and you can guess who keeps on bleeding. I had a big grin on my face the entire time I read this. It's total retro Ever since I saw Spider-Man Noir in the Spiderverse movie I was like... OMG I have to read up on ALL of them. It wasn't a hard decision and I certainly don't regret it. It's the middle of the Great Depression and the ugly streets are just getting uglier. Familiar names have different backstories and it all fits nicely into a gun-toting, corrupt city of nasty sorts and bleeding hearts and you can guess who keeps on bleeding. I had a big grin on my face the entire time I read this. It's total retro goodness. :)

  2. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    Spider-Man Noir is my first comic out of the Marvel Noir lineup. I gotta say, I loved it. The story sets itself in 1933 during the big depression era, where people with power such as the mayor, cops and politicans are not really playing by the book. It's a much darker take on the beloved web slinger. This Peter Parker is more vengeful, and he uses guns? Dope! I really liked how they utilized Ben Urich as Peter's mentor in this. Even by himself he was a pretty good character in it. My only criticis Spider-Man Noir is my first comic out of the Marvel Noir lineup. I gotta say, I loved it. The story sets itself in 1933 during the big depression era, where people with power such as the mayor, cops and politicans are not really playing by the book. It's a much darker take on the beloved web slinger. This Peter Parker is more vengeful, and he uses guns? Dope! I really liked how they utilized Ben Urich as Peter's mentor in this. Even by himself he was a pretty good character in it. My only criticism with the book that the ending felt a little bit anticlimactic. Verdict: Overall, great writing and great artwork. It gets 4.5 stars out of 5

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    **2020 Update** On December 12th, I sat down with my new tablet to read this through my Marvel Unlimited subscription. It wasn't until I finished it and went to mark it as read on Goodreads that I saw I had read and reviewed this in 2013. I had absolutely no memory of this story and I think I enjoyed it more this time than the last. **Original 2013 Review** It’s 1932 and corruption rules the streets of New York City. From the mayor to the police force, everyone’s got their hands deep in the pockets **2020 Update** On December 12th, I sat down with my new tablet to read this through my Marvel Unlimited subscription. It wasn't until I finished it and went to mark it as read on Goodreads that I saw I had read and reviewed this in 2013. I had absolutely no memory of this story and I think I enjoyed it more this time than the last. **Original 2013 Review** It’s 1932 and corruption rules the streets of New York City. From the mayor to the police force, everyone’s got their hands deep in the pockets of organized crime. Following the murder of popular socialist Ben Parker, his widow May takes up where he finished off – criticizing those in power and urging the downtrodden to rise against their oppressors. Their adopted nephew Peter, enraged over his Uncle Ben’s murder, looks to photographer Ben Ulrich as a mentor, someone who can potentially bring about real change. While observing a heist with Ulrich, Peter is bitten by an unknown breed of spider which of course, leads to his acquiring his powers. Rigging up a costume using Ben’s uniform from The Great War, Peter becomes Spider-Man. With a means to fight The Goblin and his cronies, Parker aims to bring balance to a struggling Big Apple. Earlier this year I had read Neil Gaiman’s Marvel 1602 – a story in which an alternate origin and timeline is presented for the heroes of the Marvel universe. With Spider-Man: Noir, a similar experiment is attempted by placing ol’ Web-Head back in time, all the way back to depression-era New York City. The latter works a lot better, or at least I enjoyed it more. I enjoyed the visual style of Carmine Di Giandomenico as he crafted the dark and gritty atmosphere that the story required. Throughout the story you've got a speakeasy nightclub filled with city officials and gangsters alike, rampant drug use and brutal violence set against the backdrop of the dead of winter. Can’t get much more bleak than that. While you've still got J. Jonah Jameson running The Daily Bugle, there are a few spins on classic villains like The Vulture, Kraven and The Green Goblin that keep things interesting. Overall, I enjoyed it. Despite the fact that it’s presenting itself as noir in the early 1930s rather than the standard of the forties and fifties, it has enough of the classic elements to make use of the genre effectively. While it’s not my favorite spin on a classic character, it’s a quick read that has me interested in grabbing the second volume.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Albert

    Spider-Man Noir by David Hine is a very welcome addition to the Spider-man Universe. Part of the Noir line that ran through Marvel in 2009, Spider-Man Noir tells the tale of young Peter Parker and his life in the gritty streets of New York in the 1930s. Streets that controlled by the Goblin and his mob of ex-circus freaks, like Kraven the animal trainer and the cannibal known as the Vulture. Parker works the streets with his Aunt May, defending and fighting for worker's rights. His Uncle Ben Park Spider-Man Noir by David Hine is a very welcome addition to the Spider-man Universe. Part of the Noir line that ran through Marvel in 2009, Spider-Man Noir tells the tale of young Peter Parker and his life in the gritty streets of New York in the 1930s. Streets that controlled by the Goblin and his mob of ex-circus freaks, like Kraven the animal trainer and the cannibal known as the Vulture. Parker works the streets with his Aunt May, defending and fighting for worker's rights. His Uncle Ben Parker recently murdered, Peter is filled with righteous anger against the criminal element controlling his city. Peter is befriended by the reporter Ben Ulrich and Speakeasy owner, Felicia Hardy. But then Ulrich is also killed and Peter Parker must find a way to stand up against the Goblin and his Gang. He must become the Spider-Man. Hine does a wonderful job of turning Peter and May into crusading do-gooders. The Spider-man as he is embodied here is a Sam Spade type, dry humor and gun toting as he begins to learn of the powers he has attained. But it is with the Goblin and the Vulture that Hine has done a truly unique and masterful job. They are darker and deadlier then anything they were portrayed as in the regular comic line. The scene of the Vulture eating the body of Ben Parker is gruesome and the comic reader has a definite Dorothy moment. No Toto, you are not in Kansas anymore. The Spider-Man Noir was a four issue set in 2009, with a sequel set soon after. It could however, have gone on much longer. Peter is different here. The pain and loss he suffers creates in him a much darker and much more bitter Spider-man. It is a character that is worth further life. Hopefully Marvel will figure that out but unless there is a heavy marketing opportunity, they probably won't. Spider-man fans owe it to themselves to pick this one up, no to complete a collection but for a glimpse at a darker and far more realistic Peter Parker. Look it up.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    It's the winter of 1932 and millions across America are without employment and starving in shanty towns in the cities. May and Peter Parker are socialists, trying to energise the people into a revolution until they come across Norman "The Goblin" Osborn's thugs who stomp on Peter. Ben Urich, photographer for the Daily Bugle takes pity on Peter and shows him how the city operates behind the scenes. That's when Peter decides to take things into his own hands and goes down to the docks one night to It's the winter of 1932 and millions across America are without employment and starving in shanty towns in the cities. May and Peter Parker are socialists, trying to energise the people into a revolution until they come across Norman "The Goblin" Osborn's thugs who stomp on Peter. Ben Urich, photographer for the Daily Bugle takes pity on Peter and shows him how the city operates behind the scenes. That's when Peter decides to take things into his own hands and goes down to the docks one night to see Osborn's thugs transporting goods meant for the Metropolitan Museum, one of them a sacred Spider God monument... The "Noir" series has been pretty average really which was why I was surprised by how good this one was. The story is well written and involves you from the start with the not-so-obvious choice for main character, Ben Urich, as we get introduced to the famous characters in their newly imagined settings. There were a couple of curveballs in the plot, enough to keep me sitting up as I read and which I didn't see coming. I wondered if David Hine would give Peter his spider powers but if he didn't then Peter would just be a hooded vigilante with a gun. The final confrontation between Peter and Norman, while surprising in one sense, wasn't as strong a conclusion as the story itself merited. Carmine di Giandomenico's artwork is excellent throughout. The action scenes feel very fluid and the character's expressions are subtle but clear. I also really liked his design for Spidey. Hine takes a few liberties with Spidey, for one he's a killer, and for two he's not the cheery, quipping hero we all know and love, more a sullen, almost miserable, man with a chip on his shoulder and the world on his back. But then I suppose that's why it's called "Noir". Also there's no Mary-Jane or Gwen Stacy so maybe that's why he's so angry, but there's another "Spiderman Noir" book which probably has one or both of those characters in so maybe Peter does cheer up a bit in that. Overall, the best in the "Noir" series and a pretty good Spiderman book to boot. I enjoyed reading it and loved the artwork, I heartily recommend it to Spiderfans everywhere.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    First of the Marvel Noir where there were actual superpowers involved. Good integration of the Goblin, the Vulture, Kraven, the Enforcers, and the Black Cat.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Coming into this volume my only exposure to the "Noir" incarnation of Spidey was Nic Cage's delightfully over the top portrayal in the Into the Spider-Verse film. Imagine my surprise and delight, therefore, to discover that, at least in this incarnation, the character plays it very straight and amps up the Depression-Era Angst to the eleventh notch on his RCA Wireless set. Befitting the "Noir" genre, this is not your adorable "Newsies" 1933 NYC. Instead there are shanty towns, dope pushers, corrup Coming into this volume my only exposure to the "Noir" incarnation of Spidey was Nic Cage's delightfully over the top portrayal in the Into the Spider-Verse film. Imagine my surprise and delight, therefore, to discover that, at least in this incarnation, the character plays it very straight and amps up the Depression-Era Angst to the eleventh notch on his RCA Wireless set. Befitting the "Noir" genre, this is not your adorable "Newsies" 1933 NYC. Instead there are shanty towns, dope pushers, corrupt-as-hell politicians and police and, naturally, Angels with Filthy Souls-style mobsters who aren't at all disinclined from rubbing someone out. Enter unexpected initial protagonist, Daily Bugle photog and roving reporter...Ben Urich? who proceeds to befriend and mentor a certain youngster by the name of Peter Parker as he navigates the seedy underbelly of New York, including Felicia Hardy's speakeasy. I won't reveal much more, you will see for yourself just how this one shakes down but don't think for a second it's the story you already knew! Preach, Comrade Parker!

  8. 4 out of 5

    logankstewart

    I've been a Spider-Man fan for most of my life. There's just something about that smart-mouthed Peter Parker and the villains he faces. Spider-man Noir is a familiar story of how Peter Parker becomes Spider-Man, but set in the backdrop of 1933 in struggling America. The Goblin runs the city, holding in his hand corrupt officials and policemen. Parker gets a job at the Daily Bugle to pay for college, and while he's working, he comes across evidence that can put the Goblin away. But, of course, th I've been a Spider-Man fan for most of my life. There's just something about that smart-mouthed Peter Parker and the villains he faces. Spider-man Noir is a familiar story of how Peter Parker becomes Spider-Man, but set in the backdrop of 1933 in struggling America. The Goblin runs the city, holding in his hand corrupt officials and policemen. Parker gets a job at the Daily Bugle to pay for college, and while he's working, he comes across evidence that can put the Goblin away. But, of course, things happen a bit differently than planned. I really enjoyed this comic series. The collection was short (4 comics) and easy to read. The art was mostly pretty cool, especially the noir styled Spider-Man. The story was familiar, but still entertaining. Overall, if you're a Spider-Man fan, then I easily recommend this brief series to you.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aya

    After seeing Spider-man:into the spider-verse yesterday, I was really hyped up I needed to see those characters within their stories. luckily, I started with Spider-man Noir. The SAME old story of how Peter Parker became Spider-man, except It isn't. Not the same story in many ways. We even have to Ben deaths in there. Everything on 1932's New York is dark and Creepy in it's own way, though, it's a very good take on the old story. After seeing Spider-man:into the spider-verse yesterday, I was really hyped up I needed to see those characters within their stories. luckily, I started with Spider-man Noir. The SAME old story of how Peter Parker became Spider-man, except It isn't. Not the same story in many ways. We even have to Ben deaths in there. Everything on 1932's New York is dark and Creepy in it's own way, though, it's a very good take on the old story.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Juho Pohjalainen

    Successfully maintains the core aspects of the character and the setting, while moving it almost a century into the past. We still have skyscrapers to climb and swing by. Pretty dark at places, though.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brylliams

    Definitely a prequel to what we see in Into the Spider-Verse, but it was definitely a solidly written title. Not a huge fan of the art, but it works for the subject matter.

  12. 4 out of 5

    47Time

    It's a nice change to move the classic formula into the 30's when the Prohibition is active and gangs are running the city. The characters' personalities are different enough to warrant a read for Spidey fans. There is also the slightly archaic vocabulary and the architecture and dress of the age, but few other 30's themes are explored. Fans will easily recognize each character's drive, though they lean more of the violent side, so that shouldn't be unfamiliar to them. Non-Spidey-fans may not en It's a nice change to move the classic formula into the 30's when the Prohibition is active and gangs are running the city. The characters' personalities are different enough to warrant a read for Spidey fans. There is also the slightly archaic vocabulary and the architecture and dress of the age, but few other 30's themes are explored. Fans will easily recognize each character's drive, though they lean more of the violent side, so that shouldn't be unfamiliar to them. Non-Spidey-fans may not enjoy it since they lack the frame of reference, but it's still a fun story if you ever want to see how a superhero with a 30's mindset can dismantle a gang. New York is being run by the Osborn the Goblin's gang. Citizens and officials alike know not to mess with him, but Ben Parker still does it and pays with his life. His nephew Peter wants revenge, but is too young and inexperienced to do anything about it. The journalist Urich takes the boy under his wing to allow him to strike a blow at the Goblin's image. Using the press they try to get the people to rise up against Osborn in a city plagued with poverty, corruption and fear. (view spoiler)[While investigating a tip on his own, Parker witnesses a bunch of the Goblin's thugs carry a box full of exotic spiders. One of them bites Peter and gives him the spectacular powers Spider-Man is known for. Urich is killed by Jonah Jameson when the former wanted to release some incriminating pictures about men the Goblin has killed. He already had the evidence against Osborn hidden with Felicia Hardy, the owner of a bar and speakeasy. She passes the information onto Parker who continues the fight against Osborn's organization with a more hands-on approach until the Goblin is killed. (hide spoiler)]

  13. 5 out of 5

    Travis Duke

    a well thought out and well executed graphic novel from start to finish. I will admit I am not a huge spiderman fan but I am a crime noir fan so I gave it a shot. I loved the darker 1930s take on Parker. It was actually more dark and disturbing then I initially hoped for. The writing is gritty and unapologetic. I like that Hine didn't hold back and we see Peter evolve into spider man but in a very dark way challenging him with life vs death punishment. The art was graphic and also didnt hold bac a well thought out and well executed graphic novel from start to finish. I will admit I am not a huge spiderman fan but I am a crime noir fan so I gave it a shot. I loved the darker 1930s take on Parker. It was actually more dark and disturbing then I initially hoped for. The writing is gritty and unapologetic. I like that Hine didn't hold back and we see Peter evolve into spider man but in a very dark way challenging him with life vs death punishment. The art was graphic and also didnt hold back. some of the death panel with Kraven and vulture are pretty gruesome but I loved it. I thought all the characters played a crucial part including black cat and Osborn even Aunt May had a pivotal part with peter that was really well done. I had a hard time finding fault here, really enjoyed it.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Václav

    I like remakes of something into different setting. Wild west, sci-fi, historical, and so... And I like noir in general. So I really like the noir remakes. This one is good. Good enough. The drawing and colouring is fine, half line between "usual" and "noiry". The story is taking it from very beginning - Peter becoming Spider-man, so there is no need to push forward a super-powers too much. There are better Spideys, there are better noir-remakes, but altogether this is good. I would recommend es I like remakes of something into different setting. Wild west, sci-fi, historical, and so... And I like noir in general. So I really like the noir remakes. This one is good. Good enough. The drawing and colouring is fine, half line between "usual" and "noiry". The story is taking it from very beginning - Peter becoming Spider-man, so there is no need to push forward a super-powers too much. There are better Spideys, there are better noir-remakes, but altogether this is good. I would recommend especially to the Spidey & noir fans.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Gav451

    It was the spider-verse film that introduced me to this version of Spiderman. That was an unexpectedly great film which I went to see with my 2 boys, a wonderful piece of animation. One of the better films of the year when compared with all the films I saw. It has real heart, if you have not tried it, you should. I have not kept up with Spiderman over the years so have no idea about the Multiverse and all of the ins and outs of this very old character but I am now catching up a little bit digital It was the spider-verse film that introduced me to this version of Spiderman. That was an unexpectedly great film which I went to see with my 2 boys, a wonderful piece of animation. One of the better films of the year when compared with all the films I saw. It has real heart, if you have not tried it, you should. I have not kept up with Spiderman over the years so have no idea about the Multiverse and all of the ins and outs of this very old character but I am now catching up a little bit digitally. I have no idea how this fits into cannon, I have no idea about the inception of this story so I approached it as a stand alone. [Spiderman was my entry point to American Comics and comics generally as a young child. We did not have much when I was little but on one of our rare holidays my Dad bought me about 6 collected issues of the classics and for about 6 months and read and re-read them. They were a joy to me and while it is now passe it was really true that the ordinariness of Peter Parker was a wonder to the 7 year old me. I also forever remember certain iconic images within the panels to this day. Never underestimate the power of a well written or well drawn comic.] I liked it. I liked it a lot. The setting worked, the way they framed Aunt May as an idealistic communist agitator was a brilliantly utilised plot devise without is going on too long. There are twists and turns in the tale. Betrayals and double takes that you do not expect. The Origin story works as well, it may still be a little silly but they changed it enough to mean that within its own terms it does still stand up. The design and art of the period feels spot on. It was a joy to read. Again the digital format was an ideal way of reading this. I have said this before but digital comics has been a revelation. There are deals and offers out there that mean I am able to catch up on all sorts of stuff I never would have thought of reading. It is an unexpected pleasure to once again read graphic novels among the books I am reading and varying the style and types of reading I undertake keeps it all fresh for me. Back to Spiderman Noir though. It was a great introduction. Who knows, I may pick some more of them up in due course.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Roxana Chirilă

    A pretty cool interpretation of Spider-Man, now with pretty ugly drawings (sorry, Carmine Di Giandomenico, I just hate the style). It's the 1930's and the city is an almost Gotham-like mess of criminals and corrupt politicians working together against the interest of the common man, with the Goblin in charge. Young Peter lives with his aunt May, who is a socialist demanding more for people, which lands her on the wrong side of the city's 'finest'. His uncle Ben died in a horrendous murder not lon A pretty cool interpretation of Spider-Man, now with pretty ugly drawings (sorry, Carmine Di Giandomenico, I just hate the style). It's the 1930's and the city is an almost Gotham-like mess of criminals and corrupt politicians working together against the interest of the common man, with the Goblin in charge. Young Peter lives with his aunt May, who is a socialist demanding more for people, which lands her on the wrong side of the city's 'finest'. His uncle Ben died in a horrendous murder not long before the comic started. Peter's taken through town by Ben Urich, a journalist who shows him the underbelly of the world they live in and teaches him a thing or two about photography, so Peter can pay for college. During a bit of personal investigating, though, Peter comes into contact with a supernatural spider which transforms him in a pretty horrifying sequence. This Spider-Man feels like someone older than the usual Peter Parker, and he doesn't hold back from using a gun (although he seems to give that up by the end). The story is dark and gritty, and I think it could have used a couple of extra issues and more development, but it works and, for once, I don't feel like I've accidentally started in the middle of a series again.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Stubo

    A great dive into a pulp Spidey adventure involving some creative reimagined versions of the Spidey cast. The Goblin runs a New York City empire that seems nigh on impossible to topple with no one dare trying. Enter Peter Parker. A young political activist fighting for the rights of the common people. With Aunt May’s Soapbox and Uncle Ben’s moralistic teachings being a propellant for our new gunslinging hero: Spider-Man Noir. The story contains some interesting beats, some grizzly turns for a Sp A great dive into a pulp Spidey adventure involving some creative reimagined versions of the Spidey cast. The Goblin runs a New York City empire that seems nigh on impossible to topple with no one dare trying. Enter Peter Parker. A young political activist fighting for the rights of the common people. With Aunt May’s Soapbox and Uncle Ben’s moralistic teachings being a propellant for our new gunslinging hero: Spider-Man Noir. The story contains some interesting beats, some grizzly turns for a Spider-Man comic and is not shy of verging on to the dark side which I found fresh. Some moments genuinely come as a surprise either due to twists or the sheer brutal nature showcased. For mature readers and long time fans of Spider-Man or first time readers looking for an alternative version of the webhead that releases some of the constraints of superhero tropes. Pick it up. Would not recommend for kids.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ronald

    OK, this could have been better. I liked the reporter better flaws and all, the book tries to trick you into thinking Peter is not a Spider. Speaking of origin stories, did we need the Spider Noir origin again? Can comics (or comic book movies) not just move on from origin and get to storytelling? Do better Marvel.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Glenn Rolfe

    Very cool GN. I can't wait to track down some more of these. Spider-Man set in the early '30s, all the bad guys are from the Freak Show, Goblin is awesome and The Vulture is fucking vicious. I was totally in on this one, man. It says it's books 1 so, I'm gonna look for more. Very cool GN. I can't wait to track down some more of these. Spider-Man set in the early '30s, all the bad guys are from the Freak Show, Goblin is awesome and The Vulture is fucking vicious. I was totally in on this one, man. It says it's books 1 so, I'm gonna look for more.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Portray a beloved superhero as a red-diaper communist, zero stars should be an option. .

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Botello

    Artwork was well done. The nice noir twist on the story added a darker dimension to it, breaking most habits of a Spider-Man novel with gritty, bleak and violent tones. The story sought out to be its own unique outlier, depending on the noir backdrop to breathe different and grittier characters pertaining to that era and it's "film noir" genre. Look forward to reading the rest of the noir story. Artwork was well done. The nice noir twist on the story added a darker dimension to it, breaking most habits of a Spider-Man novel with gritty, bleak and violent tones. The story sought out to be its own unique outlier, depending on the noir backdrop to breathe different and grittier characters pertaining to that era and it's "film noir" genre. Look forward to reading the rest of the noir story.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    This was a really enjoyable read, but a handful of things kept it from being a 4 or 5 for me. First, I should say that the story was handled well, and the Spiderman universe was adeptly transferred to Depression-Era America. Norman "The Goblin" Osborn was a mob leader, and several other classic villains were geeks from circus sideshows that became his thugs--and the Vulture is suddenly creepy, which is interesting. HOWEVER, all this focus on, you know, good story telling, meant that there wasn't This was a really enjoyable read, but a handful of things kept it from being a 4 or 5 for me. First, I should say that the story was handled well, and the Spiderman universe was adeptly transferred to Depression-Era America. Norman "The Goblin" Osborn was a mob leader, and several other classic villains were geeks from circus sideshows that became his thugs--and the Vulture is suddenly creepy, which is interesting. HOWEVER, all this focus on, you know, good story telling, meant that there wasn't as much Spider-Action as I'd like to see. Spidey's design is neat, but you hardly see it, and his combat style isn't really defined. I mean, he carries a GUN here, and while it's clear that he eventually probably decided against that tactic, that means that we never really see him in action in any definable way. Second, I liked the art, but it could have been a little more "noir-ish." Frank Miller doesn't really fit Spiderman well, but something closer to his style would have been nice. Even going full black and white (or mostly, with select splashes of color) would have been good--a sort of homage to the old noir films. Finally, this is a collection of a 4-part miniseries. In other words, it's just too short! More story would have allowed the well-conceived ideas to be fleshed out better, and therefore feel less sudden. The ending is somewhat abrupt and leaves some things unresolved (not in a good way). Also, more story would allow for more Spider-Action. Some might criticize the darkness of the story (it's more Batman-like), but I didn't mind. That said, I wouldn't have complained about some well-placed humor, which is of course the trademark of the character and is naturally somewhat conspicuous in its absence. Hopefully, Marvel will revisit this story arc, and perhaps consider changing the artist in the process. I would definitely pick up another trade paperback of this type.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Warner

    I loved Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. It introduced me to some Spider-People I never knew before and I wanted to get to know them better immediately. So, when I saw Noir at the library, I yanked that thing off the shelf and took it home. Yeahhhh this isn't what I was hoping it would be. In the Spider-Verse film, Spider-Man Noir is a lovingly crafted caricature of the hard-boiled detective, complete with a desire to let a match burn his fingers just so he can feel something. The character fou I loved Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse. It introduced me to some Spider-People I never knew before and I wanted to get to know them better immediately. So, when I saw Noir at the library, I yanked that thing off the shelf and took it home. Yeahhhh this isn't what I was hoping it would be. In the Spider-Verse film, Spider-Man Noir is a lovingly crafted caricature of the hard-boiled detective, complete with a desire to let a match burn his fingers just so he can feel something. The character found in this comic is... well there's some grit to the story, but it's off base. Either Spider-Man Noir evolved and was perfected in later comics or the filmmakers of Spider-Verse came up with a better interpretation of the character and his world. Black Cat, Felicia Hardy, is the only thing in the comic which feels genuine. The rest is old-timey and period relevant, but not in touch with the best of what makes noir tick. Sure, there's the reporter with a needle in his arm, the hoodlums beating up the innocent, and the corrupt newspaperman, but these feel like attempts to match the mold. It's gritty and mean but it's doesn't play as genuine or entertaining. There's something missing. The black & white art of the alternate covers, shown at the TPB's back, suggest something closer to what I was hoping the comic would be. Oh well. I hope we see more of Spider-Man Noir on the silver screen but I'm not sure I'm gonna be back for more comics if this is what they're like.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Sesana

    Transports the familiar Spider-Man mythos to Depression-era America. It can be very, very dark (Uncle Ben's fate being the prime example. Peter and Aunt May have become passionate social crusaders, which is nice to see. An interesting take, but nothing terribly exciting. Transports the familiar Spider-Man mythos to Depression-era America. It can be very, very dark (Uncle Ben's fate being the prime example. Peter and Aunt May have become passionate social crusaders, which is nice to see. An interesting take, but nothing terribly exciting.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Lahn

    Another great retelling of the Spider-Man story with a great twist.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie

    Peter Parker is unrecognizable. Everything else is good.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Tom Kepler

    I was browsing at my good old local public library and wanting to try something new. On the way to the fiction section, walking down the central aisle, I passed the small graphic novel collection and thought, "Why not?" I had looked at the graphic novels before but hadn't pulled the trigger and checked one out. Why not try one? I chose a thin book on a subject that I was familiar with and picked up Spider-Man Noir. The graphic novel's text author and goodreads self-reviewer posted the following b I was browsing at my good old local public library and wanting to try something new. On the way to the fiction section, walking down the central aisle, I passed the small graphic novel collection and thought, "Why not?" I had looked at the graphic novels before but hadn't pulled the trigger and checked one out. Why not try one? I chose a thin book on a subject that I was familiar with and picked up Spider-Man Noir. The graphic novel's text author and goodreads self-reviewer posted the following blurb: "With great power, there must also come great responsibility - and when those in power abuse it, it's the people's responsibility to remove them. The year is 1933, and New York City is not-so-secretly run by corrupt politicians, crooked cops, big businesses . . . and suave gangland bosses like New York's worst, the Goblin. But when a fateful spider-bite gives the young rabble-rouser Peter Parker the power to fight the mobster who killed his Uncle Ben, will even that be enough? It's a tangled web of Great Depression pulp, with familiar faces like you've never seen them before!" As anyone can see, the novel's 2009 storyline is familiar and aligned to the familiar characters and events in the Spider-Man movies. However the noir aspect provides a darker and more gritty feel to the novel, captured not so much by the storyline but by the art. The pictured illustrations are literally or visually more dark than many comic books I've read. Spider-Man packs a pistol and wears a costume compiled from old, iconic wardrobe styles of the 1930s--leather bomber helmet, motorcycle goggles, trench coat, and heavy clothes of natural fiber. He can still spit the web, though, and fly through the air with spiderese. My Conclusions 1) I found the graphic art of the novel interesting in the depiction of the times, the tone. The illustrations provided powerful and interesting images that concretized the novel's world view. 2) The graphic aspect of the novel didn't help me with the storyline. I do just fine reading a novel that is all text and with no illustrations. The pictures in my head, built through author description of character and setting and my imagination, are the real canvas upon which a textual novel is revealed. 3) There's nothing wrong with a new experience, though, and I enjoyed the read. 4) The comic book "bubble" dialogue and description in this graphic novel were in tiny letters. Some I read by just attending closely, and for some of the novel I pulled out a magnifying glass to read. The size of the text was just small enough to require just enough effort that I was pulled away from the storyline in order to deal with the physical experience of reading. So do I recommend the graphic novel? Sure! I experienced no epiphanies, though. It was pretty much what I expected, just smaller than I expected.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Provstgaard

    Really fun reimagining! A darker Spider-man set in an elsewhere time of the U.S. depression in the 1930's. Uh, yeah cool! I've always been a fan of elsewhere reimagined stories. With a pretty big character like Spider-man I was pretty interested, and I have got to say they did a great job. Now of corse things are going to be rushed. Such as origins, motivations, back story and more when you dive into these types of stories because they are designed for people who are familiar with the original st Really fun reimagining! A darker Spider-man set in an elsewhere time of the U.S. depression in the 1930's. Uh, yeah cool! I've always been a fan of elsewhere reimagined stories. With a pretty big character like Spider-man I was pretty interested, and I have got to say they did a great job. Now of corse things are going to be rushed. Such as origins, motivations, back story and more when you dive into these types of stories because they are designed for people who are familiar with the original story. All those elements were there and yes they were quick in this book but they were done well in my opinion. So many parallels to the Spider-man Marvel universe as we know it but with that 1930's theme. The Green Goblin, Norman Osborne. His minions of the Sinister Six such as Doc. Oc, The Vulture and even Kraven appear. Plus maybe more widely known character from Daredevil is a Bugle reporter named Ben Urich. Black Cat, Aunt May, Jameson, the gang is all here. It was really cool to see who these characters would be in an earlier time. Circus freaks to social activists. Night club owners to a respectable news paper editor. Some these characters stayed the same while others took on a different role all while staying true to who they are as we know them. I appreciated the different take on Uncle Ben's role and influence on Peter Parker. Although different it was still fresh and unique. And in doing so it shaped Peter to be a rougher version of Spider-man than we are familiar. With a darker costume from his Uncles war uniform paints a different and darker picture of Spidey than a modern day version would ever be pushed too. With the weight of the depression and crime running wild in his neighborhood, so much that his Uncle was murdered is what gives us this over the edge Spider-man. He is willing to kill and balance the scales of justice with his rage of losing his Uncle. This was a great story and unique enough to int to see more. The artwork wasn't really my favorite but it seemed to fit with in a dark and grittier time. There were parts that I felt were a little too cheesy or unrealistic but they were important parts for Peter's growth within a short amount of time. There may have been parts that were passed over quicker than I thought necessary but all together a great book with our favorite wall crawler.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Collin Henderson

    Full disclosure, I'm pretty sure this is the ssme book I read. But I have no say of knowing because I don't speak French. Anyways, this is a very gritty and often very violent take on Spider-Man. Green goblin is now a crime Lord. The vulture is now a geek, with rows of sharp teeth that he uses to nasty effect. Many other Spider-Man antagonists appear in darker versions of themselves, and most of all is alderman himself, who wears all black and straight up shoots a few guys. Let's go through the s Full disclosure, I'm pretty sure this is the ssme book I read. But I have no say of knowing because I don't speak French. Anyways, this is a very gritty and often very violent take on Spider-Man. Green goblin is now a crime Lord. The vulture is now a geek, with rows of sharp teeth that he uses to nasty effect. Many other Spider-Man antagonists appear in darker versions of themselves, and most of all is alderman himself, who wears all black and straight up shoots a few guys. Let's go through the stpries contained in this volume one at a time. Spider-Man noir: a darker origin story where Peter parker is trying to save up for college by working with a photographer for the daily bugle. His uncle ben was mauled by a a pack of dogs after going after some of the more well known criminals in the city. There are plenty of twists and turns here, with some genuinely nasty violence. It doesn't do much to rewrite the origin story but is still entertaining enough. Eyes without a face: a sequel story where this time Peter uncovers a sleeper cell of Nazi experiments in new York. This one is okay, although the juxtaposition of Nazi ideals and experiments against super villain shenanigans is probably a little tasteless. Sets up for another story that presumably never got wrotten since it's not in this collection. Edge of spiderverse #1: an improved art style tells a story of noir being dragged into a conflict involving a dimension hopping scuba diver. That has the potential to be insane. I wouldn't know though, since that storyline isn't in here. There is an okay arc involving a Peter who turns into an actual spider though which is bizarre. Spider geddon Spider-Man noir video comic: more crossover shenanigans as noir and co fight the shocker. Rather unremarkable. Overall an okay collection with some strangely perfunctory bonus stuff.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mohan Vemulapalli

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Spider-Man Noir is a grim yet hopeful tale set in the darkest days of the Great Depression. The novel lays out a landscape of corruption, loss and hopelessness in which Peter Parker becomes becomes the fist, if not voice, of the oppressed. Under the tutelage of Ben Urich, Peter documents the dismal conditions the poor and desperate residents of NYC are forced to endure by a corrupt and indifferent system. Peter eventually realizes that his photography, powerful though it is, will not cause the s Spider-Man Noir is a grim yet hopeful tale set in the darkest days of the Great Depression. The novel lays out a landscape of corruption, loss and hopelessness in which Peter Parker becomes becomes the fist, if not voice, of the oppressed. Under the tutelage of Ben Urich, Peter documents the dismal conditions the poor and desperate residents of NYC are forced to endure by a corrupt and indifferent system. Peter eventually realizes that his photography, powerful though it is, will not cause the social change he seeks due to the extensive corruption. After an incident with a magical spider artifact Peter creates a combat suit out of his uncle Ben's wartime aviator uniform and begins to take apart the mafia organization run by Norman Osborne. This is a fairly simple retelling of the Spider-Man origin tale. However, it stands out as a creative and unique version. In particular, familiar characters are given a unique twist to become new and refreshing at the same time that they are deeply true to the original. Thus Peter and Aunt may become both reformers and revolutionaries. Felicia Hardy, is portrayed as the slightly older, jaded owner of the Black Cat speakeasy. Norman Osborne becomes a mob boss served by former carnival performers such as Kraven the Hunter and the Vulture. Other characters such as Jonah Jameson and Ben Urich vary less from their original portrayals but resonate more deeply and profoundly on an emotional level than usual. As a final note, this book depicts intense violence, cannibalism and several disturbing death scenes. Most adult readers of action oriented graphic novels will be used to far worse, but this probably not appropriate for most readers below the age of middle school

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