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Essays and English Traits (Harvard Classics, #5)

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This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.


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This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern This scarce antiquarian book is a facsimile reprint of the original. Due to its age, it may contain imperfections such as marks, notations, marginalia and flawed pages. Because we believe this work is culturally important, we have made it available as part of our commitment for protecting, preserving, and promoting the world's literature in affordable, high quality, modern editions that are true to the original work.

57 review for Essays and English Traits (Harvard Classics, #5)

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lancelot Schaubert

    For the past few years, I’ve been systematically reading through the Harvard Classics in numerical order. Finished Emerson sometime in December and I can say I was pleasantly surprised. As is the case with many of the HVCs, this one was another anthology. Gratefully, it featured only one author so I didn’t have to pretend there’s some thematic unity in the whole kit. So Emerson. He is the quintessential American voice. I’m not saying I like that or hate that – I’m not making an evaluative statemen For the past few years, I’ve been systematically reading through the Harvard Classics in numerical order. Finished Emerson sometime in December and I can say I was pleasantly surprised. As is the case with many of the HVCs, this one was another anthology. Gratefully, it featured only one author so I didn’t have to pretend there’s some thematic unity in the whole kit. So Emerson. He is the quintessential American voice. I’m not saying I like that or hate that – I’m not making an evaluative statement whatsoever. I’m saying after you read Emerson, everything from Dale Carnegie to Ernest` Hemmingway makes sense. You suddenly find yourself understanding the roots of self-help culture, of the American idea of genius and individuality, of our obsession with nature and the variegated influences we pull from at any moment – our grab-bag of culture that created the beat poets and the idea of “cross-training.” Emerson is the quintessential American voice, love him or hate him, take him or leave him. And honestly, I liked most of him. About 80% of his thoughts and paragraphs had me raving for days. The other 20% was bull on the level of many well-intentioned intellectuals who use clever words and convoluted observations to justify their flawed life choices. Was that firm enough? Because I meant to be firmer… That said, I don’t feel like I was fully pulling from the classics I’ve read until I read Emerson. Specifically in his article on Shakespeare, he delves into how a genius finds himself standing in the river of man. I even wrote a song about this bit and shared the quote with other songwriters who considered doing the same. Honestly, this is going to sound arrogant or presumptuous or whatever, but I don’t care because it’s honest and there are people out there who are going to find themselves feeling the exact same way, so I’m about to say what I’m about to say for them, not those who would call me arrogant – I’ve found myself often looking for a mentor in nonprofit or writing or business work in my life, for family counsel or for friendship. In Emerson – and recently through some obscure Lewis – I’m realizing that I wasn’t truly looking for a niche mentor to help me with a niche market or sector in my life. Instead, I was looking for a master, a yogi, a rabbi whom I could follow for a decade and learn everything he knows – preferably one well-schooled in the dead languages and classics, a Christian, and a prolific writer. When in despair I’ve found myself both too obscure (or inept) to attract such a mentor and too often surrounded by specialists rather than medieval or romantic minds, I instead have taken solace in the classics. Emerson, in this process, has shown me how the greats have always stood in the river of men and found their uniqueness as the specific intersection of all of the classic ideas out there. So this one taught me that I need to finish the set, come hell or high water. And Robert Burn’s poetry in volume 6 is honestly a bit of both.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Don Stanton

    Easily one of the Top 10 books I have ever read. I found contained within its pages profound statements that I could not find a single argument against. I spent a month reading this book as I found myself, after marking it up and writing notes in the margins, putting the book down for days as I would read and reread certain passages multiple times and then pondered the impact those passages. This book has had a serious impact on my life, clarifying concepts known by well educated people, but set t Easily one of the Top 10 books I have ever read. I found contained within its pages profound statements that I could not find a single argument against. I spent a month reading this book as I found myself, after marking it up and writing notes in the margins, putting the book down for days as I would read and reread certain passages multiple times and then pondered the impact those passages. This book has had a serious impact on my life, clarifying concepts known by well educated people, but set to word with whole new visions of the human condition. I certainly recommend this book to everyone.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    My first from RWE, and not my last. I was reminded of the report from de Tocqueville on America. Highly recommended!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Pastor Greg

    One of my least favorite books that I've ever read. I think most people read and quote Emerson so they can sound intelligent. If you don't get Emerson then you're just not "deep". This man was a lost soul. His view of the world was anti-Christian and anti-Biblical. His writings were meaningless tripe most of the time. I found myself speaking to Emerson aloud and saying, "What in the WORLD does that even mean?" I had flashbacks of interviews with Charles Manson as I tried to make sense of much of One of my least favorite books that I've ever read. I think most people read and quote Emerson so they can sound intelligent. If you don't get Emerson then you're just not "deep". This man was a lost soul. His view of the world was anti-Christian and anti-Biblical. His writings were meaningless tripe most of the time. I found myself speaking to Emerson aloud and saying, "What in the WORLD does that even mean?" I had flashbacks of interviews with Charles Manson as I tried to make sense of much of Emerson's "essays". After Emerson blathers on, I find myself wanting to play that viral video clip featuring Adam Sandler as Billy Madison as he is told: "What you have just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever heard. At no point, in your rambling incoherent response were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone in this room is now dumber for having listened to it. .. God have mercy on your soul." That's Emerson. So, why 2 stars? One, because as unpleasant as it was, reading Emerson is important for the purpose of having having a point of reference as he is quoted from time to time. Two, because he occasionally says something worth reading.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ridgewalker

    I got the Harvard Classics from my dads library when he passed earlier this year. The first book I read was Emerson. I liked this book, though not as much as I had hoped. Emerson is a deep thinker, well thought out, and well expressed for someone in the 19th century. For me the writing style took some immersion to get acclimated to though. At nearly 500 pages this happened soon enough. I like Emerson's view of the common man and his faith in the value of hard work. I liked his description of lif I got the Harvard Classics from my dads library when he passed earlier this year. The first book I read was Emerson. I liked this book, though not as much as I had hoped. Emerson is a deep thinker, well thought out, and well expressed for someone in the 19th century. For me the writing style took some immersion to get acclimated to though. At nearly 500 pages this happened soon enough. I like Emerson's view of the common man and his faith in the value of hard work. I liked his description of life in England in the mid 1800's. I got as much value from the discipline of reading him though as I did from reading him.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Essays and English Traits by RW Emerson.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Peter J.

    This was a good, though at times rambling work. It started off very strongly.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Patrick Johnson

  9. 5 out of 5

    Paul

  10. 4 out of 5

    Brian

  11. 4 out of 5

    Holly

  12. 4 out of 5

    Welshofer

  13. 4 out of 5

    Lauren Barrett

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rich

  15. 4 out of 5

    Lilani Masters

  16. 4 out of 5

    Joseph Downey

  17. 4 out of 5

    Christian

  18. 4 out of 5

    Fred Kiesche

  19. 4 out of 5

    Elden Griggs

  20. 4 out of 5

    Christine Uyehara

  21. 4 out of 5

    Morgana

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Paul

  23. 5 out of 5

    Mwmosley

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andre

  25. 4 out of 5

    Michael Jepson

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Thomas

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mohamed

  28. 4 out of 5

    Drew Walsh

  29. 5 out of 5

    G.G. Galt

  30. 5 out of 5

    Brendan

  31. 4 out of 5

    Epworth Library

  32. 4 out of 5

    David

  33. 5 out of 5

    Keith

  34. 4 out of 5

    Kevin

  35. 4 out of 5

    Dawson

  36. 5 out of 5

    Dee Renee Chesnut

  37. 5 out of 5

    Vazir Singh

  38. 4 out of 5

    nalasbang

  39. 4 out of 5

    Pamela

  40. 4 out of 5

    Angela Randall

  41. 5 out of 5

    Bonnie

  42. 4 out of 5

    J. Michael

  43. 4 out of 5

    Mwmosley

  44. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  45. 5 out of 5

    Ami

  46. 5 out of 5

    Steve

  47. 4 out of 5

    Mrpretzel

  48. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

  49. 5 out of 5

    Beksko

  50. 4 out of 5

    Thomas Schreiber

  51. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  52. 5 out of 5

    Austin Riley

  53. 5 out of 5

    David Redden

  54. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Woodall

  55. 5 out of 5

    The Hoffman

  56. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer

  57. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

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