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Reflections: Memoirs of Japanese American Women in Minnesota

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5 review for Reflections: Memoirs of Japanese American Women in Minnesota

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    John Nobuya Tsuchida worked with 14 Japanese-American women from Minnesota to document their experiences as American citizens who, with their parents and siblings, were removed from their homes and placed in American-style concentration camps during World War II. Because each woman is allowed to fully tell her story, and many had similar backgrounds or were at the same camps, there is repetition. That tempts one to skips paragraphs, but there is value in the repetition. Over and over, we learn h John Nobuya Tsuchida worked with 14 Japanese-American women from Minnesota to document their experiences as American citizens who, with their parents and siblings, were removed from their homes and placed in American-style concentration camps during World War II. Because each woman is allowed to fully tell her story, and many had similar backgrounds or were at the same camps, there is repetition. That tempts one to skips paragraphs, but there is value in the repetition. Over and over, we learn how this incarceration took everyone by surprise -- even considering previous civil rights violations such as those that prevented their families from owning property. Many found that the U.S. government had been collecting information about their families for years -- thus the speed at which they were rounded up and taken to compounds that had obviously been prepared for them with careful, long-term planning. Although these gentle women put a positive spin on their experiences and their subsequent opportunities for work and education outside of the camps, it is chilling to read about the mass hysteria that was either ignored, encouraged, or created among the American populace by the government. I don't think we can say, "Well, that was 1942; that can't happen again." Some of their experiences are in our daily news: looking different from the majority population, having an unfamiliar culture and faith, and being immigrants. I recommend this book. It is an engaging way to learn more about the internment camps and American racism.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Doll

  3. 5 out of 5

    Melon109

  4. 5 out of 5

    Vicky Mckay

  5. 5 out of 5

    Selena

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