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Hittite Warrior

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When Uriah Tarhund's Hititte home is destroyed by invading Greeks, his dying father tells him to go seek a Canaanite named Sisera. "He will help you. For my sake...." When Uriah reaches Judea and saves a young boy from being sacrificed to Molech, he is given succor for a time by the Hebrews. Later, he finds Sisera and joins him in war against these same people. When the Ca When Uriah Tarhund's Hititte home is destroyed by invading Greeks, his dying father tells him to go seek a Canaanite named Sisera. "He will help you. For my sake...." When Uriah reaches Judea and saves a young boy from being sacrificed to Molech, he is given succor for a time by the Hebrews. Later, he finds Sisera and joins him in war against these same people. When the Canaanites are defeated, the young Hittite has the opportunity to come to a peace with himself, the Hebrew people and their God.


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When Uriah Tarhund's Hititte home is destroyed by invading Greeks, his dying father tells him to go seek a Canaanite named Sisera. "He will help you. For my sake...." When Uriah reaches Judea and saves a young boy from being sacrificed to Molech, he is given succor for a time by the Hebrews. Later, he finds Sisera and joins him in war against these same people. When the Ca When Uriah Tarhund's Hititte home is destroyed by invading Greeks, his dying father tells him to go seek a Canaanite named Sisera. "He will help you. For my sake...." When Uriah reaches Judea and saves a young boy from being sacrificed to Molech, he is given succor for a time by the Hebrews. Later, he finds Sisera and joins him in war against these same people. When the Canaanites are defeated, the young Hittite has the opportunity to come to a peace with himself, the Hebrew people and their God.

30 review for Hittite Warrior

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    Hittite Warrior tells the story of a teenage Hittite boy named Uriah-Tarhund. He came from a people who ruled the "northern world" and the Egyptians ruled the "southern world." His father was a lord and kinsman of the chief province of Arzawa. One fateful day, in the 13th year of the reign of the king, his father and he embarked to Hattusas to pay tribute. Little did he know that trip would end so tragically. While on his journey, his mother and sister were killed. His entire province was decima Hittite Warrior tells the story of a teenage Hittite boy named Uriah-Tarhund. He came from a people who ruled the "northern world" and the Egyptians ruled the "southern world." His father was a lord and kinsman of the chief province of Arzawa. One fateful day, in the 13th year of the reign of the king, his father and he embarked to Hattusas to pay tribute. Little did he know that trip would end so tragically. While on his journey, his mother and sister were killed. His entire province was decimated and many were killed. Three years later his father died, but not before making Uriah promise to travel to Canaan and live there. Travelling with a caravan, his decision to save the life of a young trader named Hannibaal took him to Tyre where he made a friend named Jotham, a Hebrew. This friendship set him on a path that would change his life forever. The book is based during the time of the Judges, which was roughly 1200 B.C. If you have read through the Old Testament book of Judges with your children, they will recognize the two important names of Deborah and Barak. Deborah and Barak are the two judges who defeated the Canaanites in Judges 4. They will also recognize the song of Deborah from Judges 5. They will also learn a bit of geography. There is a tiny map in the front that serves as a basic guide for the region of the book, but they can further their knowledge by having an atlas or world map and track the journeys of Uriah. Your children will also be exposed to different societies, religious practices, and customs of these ancient people. For example, they will learn about an ancient Ammonite god named Moloch who required the sacrifice of a young child to appease him. This is an A+ historical fiction novel for children 10 and up. I, a 30+ male, had a hard time putting this book down and read it in one weekend. While I would argue that this book is more geared towards a male audience, girls might enjoy it as well. What I really loved about this book is the era and region it was written about. So much historical fiction based in ancient times focuses on Egypt or Rome and that's it. Ms. Williamson chose a neglected but equally important region and delivered a masterpiece. I am very pleased with Bethlehem Books' Living History Library series and cannot wait to dive into another book. Be sure to check out other books from this author, particularly God King.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sean

    This has got to be one of the worst books ever written. The entire way through, it seemed as if the author was TRYING to confuse the reader, and she did an excellent job at it. Nothing about it was well done...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bethany W

    Hittite Warrior takes place around the time of the Israelite judges, specifically during the time of Deborah. The reader is introduced to Uriah the Hittite and the book briefly portrays a very thorough description of what it meant to be a Hittite at the time. Note: THIS Uriah the Hittite has nothing to do with biblical Uriah the Hittite who is Bathsheba‘s husband. After introducing the reader to Uriah and his Hittite life, the story falls apart. Characters are haphazardly introduced and disappear, Hittite Warrior takes place around the time of the Israelite judges, specifically during the time of Deborah. The reader is introduced to Uriah the Hittite and the book briefly portrays a very thorough description of what it meant to be a Hittite at the time. Note: THIS Uriah the Hittite has nothing to do with biblical Uriah the Hittite who is Bathsheba‘s husband. After introducing the reader to Uriah and his Hittite life, the story falls apart. Characters are haphazardly introduced and disappear, only to pop up again. Great detail is spent explaining random side characters who are inconsequential to the storyline, while barely enough detail is given to the main actors. In my opinion, this only serves to confuse the reader, who is left wondering if this new person is someone they really should pay attention to or not. There is no consequential character growth or development – all characters are static. I wouldn’t even say there’s a clearly identifiable “moral” or “lesson learned” to this story. There are incredible leaps in plot logic. Uriah crosses paths with a slave who doesn’t kill him. Later this slave saves Uriah's life... because the slave is actually the deposed pharaoh of Egypt and therefore his noble ideals thus compel him to act with nobility??? And Uriah recognizes he is pharaoh because he saw his grandma’s broach which had an Egyptian pharaoh painting on it? There is no explanation or resolution to this bonus Egyptian storyline. The pharaoh is determined to get back his throne and disappears from the plot as quickly as he arrives. Additionally, the author treats the serious subject of child sacrifice in such PG way that it just feels… odd. At the heart of the book is the narrative of Uriah rescuing a toddler from child sacrifice. And Moloch (the scorned god) is presented in fairly terrifying graphic words. I was not exactly expecting that for the young readers that the book targets. So is this book worth reading? Eh. Maybe. It pained an interesting picture of the interwoven tribal intricacies of Bronze Age tribal warfare. This is the book’s unique (and perhaps only) strength. Do I plan to let my kids read this book or read another book by this author? No. NOTES TO TALK TO STUDENTS ABOUT: child sacrifice, kidnapping, childhood death, starvation, tribal warfare* *I am not necessarily against these themes in books. I have children who are sensitive to these things and so I make notes so I can remember to discuss with them to help them process.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rick Davis

    A great way to bring the period of the Sea Peoples Movement and the biblical book of Judges to life.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jessica

    The book offered a great “living history” experience for our children of the time period roughly 1400-1200 BC. The reader gets a good sense of the anxiety felt by the inhabitants of Canaan causes by the frequent shifts in political power as the Hittite Empire falls, and the power of Egypt wanes, and others like the Philistines are on the rise. As the narrative also includes details from the book of Judges it was a good companion read for us as we have recently finished Judges in our family Bible The book offered a great “living history” experience for our children of the time period roughly 1400-1200 BC. The reader gets a good sense of the anxiety felt by the inhabitants of Canaan causes by the frequent shifts in political power as the Hittite Empire falls, and the power of Egypt wanes, and others like the Philistines are on the rise. As the narrative also includes details from the book of Judges it was a good companion read for us as we have recently finished Judges in our family Bible study.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Calvin Edwards

    Compared with other historical fiction this book is not too bad. But as a book I disliked it and found it too fast paced.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Angie Thompson

    This story definitely fulfilled the historical requirement of historical fiction. The descriptions, the dialogue, and the attitudes of the characters all wove together to give the impression of being right in the middle of biblical lands and times. I'm not sure how many of the details were real and how many were fabricated for the story, but the impression they gave was very authentic. I found myself lamenting at times that the author had been so apparently accurate with personal names--some of This story definitely fulfilled the historical requirement of historical fiction. The descriptions, the dialogue, and the attitudes of the characters all wove together to give the impression of being right in the middle of biblical lands and times. I'm not sure how many of the details were real and how many were fabricated for the story, but the impression they gave was very authentic. I found myself lamenting at times that the author had been so apparently accurate with personal names--some of them were a real mouthful! Not having much knowledge of the history of the times of the judges (beyond the biblical history), I felt a bit confused and overwhelmed at times trying to put the pieces together. I also found myself trying to connect pieces of history that were much too late for the setting or wondering if a character with a familiar name was supposed to be a biblical character of the same name. (As far as I could tell, none of them were beyond the obvious ones--Deborah, Barak, Sisera, Jael, Heber.) I'm not sure how it could have been done better from this particular point of view, but the thing that bothered me most was how much mixed-up and unclear theology was included. By that, I don't just mean the false gods that the other nations worshiped; of course, I expected that. But, historically accurate as it might have been, it was jolting to have "Adoni" mentioned by a Canaanite as one in a string of the gods they worshipped. Some of the Israelites showed faulty theology at times, too--having calf images that were worshiped in the name of God and talking about human sacrifice as though God condoned it. Also, we were left with the impression that the one god worshiped by the Egyptian Ahmoses, and who he identified as the sun, was basically the same as the God of the Israelites. Because the viewpoint character was also a pagan until the end of the book, these issues were never really addressed, which left it confusing and a bit disturbing to me. There's a lot of truth and falsehood to be sorted out in this book, and I would definitely be reluctant to let a young reader try to sift through it on his or her own.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Katie Blendermann

    It was quite good, though it was sometimes hard to follow. Also, throughout the whole book, I did not notice things like, "When I was nine" or "3 years later" or "That happened 5 months ago". Overall it was very good and I would recommend it to other readers. It was quite good, though it was sometimes hard to follow. Also, throughout the whole book, I did not notice things like, "When I was nine" or "3 years later" or "That happened 5 months ago". Overall it was very good and I would recommend it to other readers.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Caton

    Very good read! A great page turner!

  10. 4 out of 5

    Tara Starr bishop

    We really enjoyed this book as a read aloud. Grateful for wonderful historical fiction books such as this!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Abigail Westbrook

    We read this book aloud as part of our ancient history studies for homeschool, and we all absolutely loved it - even my 5 and 6 year olds. Somehow I have never even heard of Joanne Williamson’s books before, but I am so glad to have discovered them now. The writing quality is top notch, with solid characters and plenty of action. A must read!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    The first few chapters went a little slow, but then it picked up. A very enjoyable read set in the time of the Judges. Well written and really makes this time period come alive!

  13. 4 out of 5

    David Schroeder

    Terrible. Just terrible.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Toby

    One of the worst books I have ever read!!!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    I read this to the kids. It was really good and one of the best read-out-louds I have done with them in awhile. The titular character (Uriah) is a Hittite adolescent who happens to come of age at the same time as the events in Judges 4. (Deborah, Sisera, battle on the plain, Jael and the peg in the brain, etc.) The book follows Uriah as he travels (or flees as circumstances unfold) from Asia Minor to Tyre to the hill country of Palestine to Tyre (again) and then again back to the hills. The book I read this to the kids. It was really good and one of the best read-out-louds I have done with them in awhile. The titular character (Uriah) is a Hittite adolescent who happens to come of age at the same time as the events in Judges 4. (Deborah, Sisera, battle on the plain, Jael and the peg in the brain, etc.) The book follows Uriah as he travels (or flees as circumstances unfold) from Asia Minor to Tyre to the hill country of Palestine to Tyre (again) and then again back to the hills. The book does *not* attempt to "retell" the biblical story, except for the battle scene (where Uriah fights on behalf of the Canaanites), but Uriah does interact with Sisera, Deborah, Barak, and Heber as the military campaign unfolds. At the book's conclusion, Uriah ends up with nowhere to go (as the Philistines conquer Tyre) and he goes to where the Hebrews are camping in hopes that his one true friend (a Hebrew) will accept him. There, Barak accepts his promise to never take up arms again against the tribes, and Uriah ultimately calls upon Yahweh as the one true God. The kids really liked it and were able to follow along. It fit well with their ancient history curriculum.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alli

    Williams’s God King was one of my favorite books that I read with my kids through the years so I had super high expectations for HW. It didn’t live up to them, but it was still a good book that my son and I enjoyed as a supplement to our studies on ancient cultures. Williams really does have a knack for bringing a confusing era of history into focus. Unfortunately HW didn’t bring a suspenseful action packed story into the history as well as she did with God King, but it still had some twists and Williams’s God King was one of my favorite books that I read with my kids through the years so I had super high expectations for HW. It didn’t live up to them, but it was still a good book that my son and I enjoyed as a supplement to our studies on ancient cultures. Williams really does have a knack for bringing a confusing era of history into focus. Unfortunately HW didn’t bring a suspenseful action packed story into the history as well as she did with God King, but it still had some twists and turns I didn’t expect and a solid coming of age story with a few good battle scenes thrown in. This is middle grade and I recommend it for all ages interested in the ancient cultures of the Hittites, Canaanites, Philistines, and Israelites.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ryan

    It’s good as an ancient history and lit. supplement for 11-12 yr olds. Great effort to intersect various civilizations and cultures during the time of Israel’s judges, and the scenes in the camp of Deborah and Barak I thought were impressive overall. The development and character of the main guy was ok, but something about the last portion of the story— his part in the battle, the Egyptian friend who was suddenly portrayed to have all the answers, and the general spiritual resolution— just didn’ It’s good as an ancient history and lit. supplement for 11-12 yr olds. Great effort to intersect various civilizations and cultures during the time of Israel’s judges, and the scenes in the camp of Deborah and Barak I thought were impressive overall. The development and character of the main guy was ok, but something about the last portion of the story— his part in the battle, the Egyptian friend who was suddenly portrayed to have all the answers, and the general spiritual resolution— just didn’t seem to work.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kristy

    I have mixed feelings about this book. I really liked how it wove together the histories of various ancient tribes in the Africa/Middle Eastern area and the narrative was great for helping me to picture Old Testament times and events and understand them a little better. However it is pretty graphic in terms of violence and although I read it with the intention of using it with me middle schooler, I won’t be teaching it and am glad that I pre-read it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Christi

    This one gets four stars because it's a great story, well written, with solid characters that would make an interesting discussion-but also because I've never found a story about this time period. It inevitably has a lot of religion in it, but in a good way that would promote discussion and various viewpoints I think. I can't wait for my kids to read it and I can't wait to talk about it with them. This one gets four stars because it's a great story, well written, with solid characters that would make an interesting discussion-but also because I've never found a story about this time period. It inevitably has a lot of religion in it, but in a good way that would promote discussion and various viewpoints I think. I can't wait for my kids to read it and I can't wait to talk about it with them.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    The story took twists and turns I did not expect but I found the writing a little clunky, especially for reading aloud. The story did bring to life a period of history that we tend to study in isolated people-group chunks: the Egyptians, the Hebrews, the Greek peoples, and it was interesting to see these different groups woven together in historically accurate interactions. Rounding up a 3.5 star review to 4 stars.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Hilary Forrest

    I enjoyed certain aspects of this book. Mostly how the author wove together different nation's histories during the times of the Judges in the Bible. However, it was a bit tacky how the stories of the characters intertwined with each other. The names were hard to keep track of and the characters kept surfacing and disappearing. I enjoyed certain aspects of this book. Mostly how the author wove together different nation's histories during the times of the Judges in the Bible. However, it was a bit tacky how the stories of the characters intertwined with each other. The names were hard to keep track of and the characters kept surfacing and disappearing.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Toffee Mama

    3.5 stars. I read this along with my girls for their school. The story was set during a real-life event, although the plot was fairly heavily contrived to get the main character to that point. We are also studying the ancient geography in which the story takes place, which I thought made the book much more interesting.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Marcie

    In the mood to read a historical fiction book set in ancient times. Not sure how Ms. Williamson's Hittite Warrior came to my attention, but never having read a historical fiction book on the Hittites is why I decided to read it on my phone over the last several months while waiting at appointments or traveling in the car. In the mood to read a historical fiction book set in ancient times. Not sure how Ms. Williamson's Hittite Warrior came to my attention, but never having read a historical fiction book on the Hittites is why I decided to read it on my phone over the last several months while waiting at appointments or traveling in the car.

  24. 4 out of 5

    classicsreader

    Gratuituous and unappreciable; to say the very, very least. Quite sorry to see the 'market' on this one--which is to those interested in 'classical education'. I couldn't even make it 'into' the story line. And I think that that is sad, for the basic reading level that it is at. Gratuituous and unappreciable; to say the very, very least. Quite sorry to see the 'market' on this one--which is to those interested in 'classical education'. I couldn't even make it 'into' the story line. And I think that that is sad, for the basic reading level that it is at.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jodi

    We read this aloud for school alongside our history curriculum. It was a bit hard to follow throughout, but the last several chapters were easier and probably the most interesting. Note: much mention of gods and idols, child sacrifice, murder, battle, conquest.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Leila Bowers

    M. Loved it - wants to add it to her personal collection.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    Sixth grade me drooled over Hittite Warrior.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Jacob Anderson

    4.5 stars

  29. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    Not bad. It did a pretty good job of making the history come alive for the kids. We got it because it was on the syllabus for RC history.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Jorgensen

    Designed for children but definitely enjoyable for adults. An easy read with rich and well-researched historical detail. It brings to life a period of history that's rarely written about in fiction. Designed for children but definitely enjoyable for adults. An easy read with rich and well-researched historical detail. It brings to life a period of history that's rarely written about in fiction.

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