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Crossing the Chasm: Marketing and Selling High-Tech Products to Mainstream Customers

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Here is the bestselling guide that created a new game plan for marketing in high-tech industries. Crossing the Chasm has become the bible for bringing cutting-edge products to progressively larger markets. This edition provides new insights into the realities of high-tech marketing, with special emphasis on the Internet. It's essential reading for anyone with a stake in th Here is the bestselling guide that created a new game plan for marketing in high-tech industries. Crossing the Chasm has become the bible for bringing cutting-edge products to progressively larger markets. This edition provides new insights into the realities of high-tech marketing, with special emphasis on the Internet. It's essential reading for anyone with a stake in the world's most exciting marketplace.


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Here is the bestselling guide that created a new game plan for marketing in high-tech industries. Crossing the Chasm has become the bible for bringing cutting-edge products to progressively larger markets. This edition provides new insights into the realities of high-tech marketing, with special emphasis on the Internet. It's essential reading for anyone with a stake in th Here is the bestselling guide that created a new game plan for marketing in high-tech industries. Crossing the Chasm has become the bible for bringing cutting-edge products to progressively larger markets. This edition provides new insights into the realities of high-tech marketing, with special emphasis on the Internet. It's essential reading for anyone with a stake in the world's most exciting marketplace.

30 review for Crossing the Chasm: Marketing and Selling High-Tech Products to Mainstream Customers

  1. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Ski Kinsey

    In 2003 I reached a simple conclusion: I knew nothing about Marketing. Having created a Marketing company during college (after owning several businesses and spending more than a year selling advertising for a newspaper) with paying customers and everything! So, I immersed myself in learning everything possible about Marketing in the context of small privately held firms. After seven years, I can honestly say that I now know nothing about Marketing... except that I know more than 99% of the peopl In 2003 I reached a simple conclusion: I knew nothing about Marketing. Having created a Marketing company during college (after owning several businesses and spending more than a year selling advertising for a newspaper) with paying customers and everything! So, I immersed myself in learning everything possible about Marketing in the context of small privately held firms. After seven years, I can honestly say that I now know nothing about Marketing... except that I know more than 99% of the people who claim they do. This book changed my life, and the lives of my clients. I bought it in April 1999 and skimmed it. But it was not until April 2009 that I dug in to learn its secrets. I was simply amazed. If Marketing touches any part of your business (or personal) life, you must buy, read, and re-read this book. Until you understand the power of referenceability, may I be so bold as to suggest that you are clueless about Marketing?

  2. 4 out of 5

    Charles Ames

    A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing. This book lays out the mechanics of formulating and evolving a marketing strategy by exploring an extreme boundary case: introducing a fundamentally new product to the marketplace. The principles are relevant to all businesses everywhere. However, it would be wrong to view this book as a simple roadmap, because it is very hard to know where on the map you're starting. Do you really have something that will be regarded as a "disruptively innovative pro A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing. This book lays out the mechanics of formulating and evolving a marketing strategy by exploring an extreme boundary case: introducing a fundamentally new product to the marketplace. The principles are relevant to all businesses everywhere. However, it would be wrong to view this book as a simple roadmap, because it is very hard to know where on the map you're starting. Do you really have something that will be regarded as a "disruptively innovative product", or is it really just an incremental advance, subject to the rules of one of Moore's later books, such as the Gorilla Game? The most basic point of this book is that the tactics that serve you well at one stage will sink you in the next, so you better orient yourself properly before shouting and writing big checks. That warning aside, this book belongs on the shelf next to other hallowed volumed of condensed wisdom like The Art of War, The Prince, and How to Shit in the Woods -- All illuminating, and all easily misused.

  3. 5 out of 5

    WhatIReallyRead

    It was to the point, usable, concise and competent. Exactly what I would want in a book I'm reading for work. It's a rather short book, but still it took me over half a year to finish! It was pretty good: - a well-articulated model describing high-tech marketing on various stages of its adoption life cycle; - clear implications of adopting such a model were presented and well-organized; - the author gave examples of real-world products and how the model applies to them; - there were instructions and It was to the point, usable, concise and competent. Exactly what I would want in a book I'm reading for work. It's a rather short book, but still it took me over half a year to finish! It was pretty good: - a well-articulated model describing high-tech marketing on various stages of its adoption life cycle; - clear implications of adopting such a model were presented and well-organized; - the author gave examples of real-world products and how the model applies to them; - there were instructions and concrete steps to take to make use of this model and applying it to your own case. So overall I liked it and would recommend it. The only reason I'm giving it 4 stars is that it took me so long to finish it. The product I'm working on, I realized, is pretty mature, so I wasn't compelled to read this book quickly and had to push myself to go on.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Will Chou

    Lots and lots of opinions, directions, and instructions with very few reasons and evidence (let alone science) to back it up. The stories and anecdotes that are mentioned to back up points are cherry picked. Research on the credibility, track record, and net worth of the author only made my skepticism increase. I cant say his directions are wrong. But I wasn't convinced they were right. I'm sure many other people have failed to even consider these components before rushing to implement on his ad Lots and lots of opinions, directions, and instructions with very few reasons and evidence (let alone science) to back it up. The stories and anecdotes that are mentioned to back up points are cherry picked. Research on the credibility, track record, and net worth of the author only made my skepticism increase. I cant say his directions are wrong. But I wasn't convinced they were right. I'm sure many other people have failed to even consider these components before rushing to implement on his advice (considering how famous the book is), which I think is a dangerous error.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Milhouse Van Houten

    good one.. must read!! Read and enjoy:)

  6. 4 out of 5

    Abdelrahman

    For a reason, this book should be labeled as a textbook, not like a free-time one. It took months to finish it and yet I believe I need to recap, revise and find other summaries for it. Although I got the 1997 edition, it is yet relevant to the high tech industry nowadays. Yet, found it hard to get the examples of the 90s companies that are no giants, or even exists, now.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Vlad Ardelean

    I didn't know much about marketing, so this gets 5 stars The book adressed a lot of issues relevant to my current company directly. First of all, the chasm model applies in B2B scenarios. This is not a b2c marketing book even if some ideas do apply. What I found interesting was that this book provides this model describing 5 different types of customers. Then we find ways in which to address these customers, the proper timings, the proper sales pitches, the product pricing, the competitors, the str I didn't know much about marketing, so this gets 5 stars The book adressed a lot of issues relevant to my current company directly. First of all, the chasm model applies in B2B scenarios. This is not a b2c marketing book even if some ideas do apply. What I found interesting was that this book provides this model describing 5 different types of customers. Then we find ways in which to address these customers, the proper timings, the proper sales pitches, the product pricing, the competitors, the strategic partnerships, the development team, and even the compensation appropriate for the team, in order to attack each of the 4 market segments (1 market segment, or psychographic, as the author calls it, being pretty unapproachable). Awesome book. For me it would be an honest 4.5, as I didn't see a lot of references to more formal papers, but just to a few other books, and I don't want to just trust the author's wisdom on this, even if the book seems full of good ideas, and great explanations, and showcases nice ways of thinking about problems. I recommend this to anyone living in a capitalist system, seriosly....But more seriously indeed, this is very good for developers that work in product companies. All of the marketing, sales and management stuff will make a hell of a lot more sense after this book! For marketing and sales people I'm not sure what to recommend, but the book does claim to create a common vocabulary for the different departments of an organization, so dunno, maybe try it, marketing/sales/management folks! Enjoy! Also, if anyone knows a good B2C marketing or sales book, feel free to recommend!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Adrian

    This book gives a fresh and powerful set of tools to help navigate the stages of product life, as well as covering honestly some of the hard decisions that must be made. A great book for those interested in making their technology sustainable and more than just a passing fad. These are among the dozens of passages of greatest interest and value to me: Page 8 Most important lesson of crossing the chasm Page 25 discovering the chasm Page 39 last paragraph, what technology enthusiast want Page 49 last This book gives a fresh and powerful set of tools to help navigate the stages of product life, as well as covering honestly some of the hard decisions that must be made. A great book for those interested in making their technology sustainable and more than just a passing fad. These are among the dozens of passages of greatest interest and value to me: Page 8 Most important lesson of crossing the chasm Page 25 discovering the chasm Page 39 last paragraph, what technology enthusiast want Page 49 last paragraph targeting a small pond / market Page 50 bowling pin analogy Page 54 pragmatics or early majority Page 78 fighting your way into the mainstream and the D-day strategy Page 85 big fish, small pond Page 88 Apple's Mac niche strategy Page 105 target the point of attack Page 110 target customer characterization Page 113 sample scenario Page 120 scoring scenarios / customer target's Page 124 second last paragraph on focus on product not competition Page 126 target market selection process checklist Page 160 whole product strategy Page 184 what is your claim Page 186 example claims do exercise Page 201 avoid human contact businesses Page 222 adopt a make money from day 1 mindset

  9. 4 out of 5

    Lou Robinson

    Hmmm. I’m not sure I would have read this unless it had been chosen as the uk it book club pick, not really my bag (you know what I’m like with any non-fiction really). But it wasn’t dreadful, in fact I quite enjoyed the first few scene setting chapters, particularly where the book had been updated and referenced some recent company examples. It was ok.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Andriy Bas

    Great analysis of the product lifecycle. Must read for any product manager or entrepreneur.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Maurício Linhares

    So, product development! I wasn't really sure if this was going to be for me (and the latest edition is form 1998, so, it might have been a bit dated) but this was actually a great surprise. The idea of the chasms when marketing products, specially in tech, really resonates with what happens in the market and we can compile a huge list of companies and products that have died somewhere along the way while trying to cross one of the chasms to become a mainstream product. The book defines markets as So, product development! I wasn't really sure if this was going to be for me (and the latest edition is form 1998, so, it might have been a bit dated) but this was actually a great surprise. The idea of the chasms when marketing products, specially in tech, really resonates with what happens in the market and we can compile a huge list of companies and products that have died somewhere along the way while trying to cross one of the chasms to become a mainstream product. The book defines markets as groups that can refer to themselves, since you can't really hope a doctor will refer and have many friends in architecture, so the main goal is to be able to create a presence in a market where people can refer and talk about your product among themselves as you can't possibly pay for marketing for every single person there. The charms are defined as innovators, the first market, where you excite the people most interested in whatever new thing you have (think about the first geeks buying smart home appliances). These people are mostly interested in the novelty of your stuff and will try to direct the product, they're extremely helpful in trying to come up with an actual product at the end but focusing too much on them will pull you in many different directions, so while it's important to have them on your side, you can't just follow them blindly otherwise you won't be getting anywhere. Then you have the early adopters. These are the people influenced by the innovators you have, they're also interested in the improvement but they will be less engaging than the innovators. These people are less prone to bugs, errors or support requirements but they're the start of your upward race collecting more customers and building a better product that could possibly find it's way to the mainstream market. Then we have the great chasm to reach the skeptics mainstream customers, this is where stuff gets really hard and you'll really need to up your game as the people here are pragmatists and conservatives. They don't want to invest money in something new just because it's shiny, they need a good reason and a working product, some prototype that requires a lot of handholding from an unknown company won't do it here, you must have already sorted out most of the kinks in your product and you need to be ready to own the market. To do this the book offers segmentation, preparing a D Day operation to attack a very specific market that you can corner and own, since being the top brass in such market makes these pragmatists and conservatives much more likely to buy from you. This requires focus and forfeiting embrace everything solutions (that wouldn't work, anyway) and will give you much better results. The book then goes about pricing (and it's a great discussion, like how much money you need to be making to have an actual sales force and product price point), partnerships and other stuff involved. All in all it offers a great perspective and techniques to break into markets, develop products and growing. It's small, direct and focused, definitely recommended.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Boris

    It's a classic... and the point it makes is solid (more or less, that the skills needed to make an innovative product for early adopters are very different from those to make a mass market whole product). That said it's very dated, and most of the advice pertains to large products. The paradigm it establishes has no room for crowdfunding, or for companies like 37signals that don't hardsell anyone. It's a very sales-driven viewpoint on things for a corporate world that's very focused on the bottom It's a classic... and the point it makes is solid (more or less, that the skills needed to make an innovative product for early adopters are very different from those to make a mass market whole product). That said it's very dated, and most of the advice pertains to large products. The paradigm it establishes has no room for crowdfunding, or for companies like 37signals that don't hardsell anyone. It's a very sales-driven viewpoint on things for a corporate world that's very focused on the bottom line. I'm sure much of it still applies, but it talks about the parts of the world that I strive not to interact with all that much.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Carl Rannaberg

    A very good book about transitioning between marketing and selling from early-adopters to mainstream customers. This transition is called chasm as it doesn’t happen smoothly. There need to be fundamental changes how the company markets and sells it’s product. Mainstream customers need other mainstream customers to recommend your product. That’s right there is the chasm. The solution is to solve niche issues and then expand as you have references from mainstream customers. For example you have do A very good book about transitioning between marketing and selling from early-adopters to mainstream customers. This transition is called chasm as it doesn’t happen smoothly. There need to be fundamental changes how the company markets and sells it’s product. Mainstream customers need other mainstream customers to recommend your product. That’s right there is the chasm. The solution is to solve niche issues and then expand as you have references from mainstream customers. For example you have document management solution and you start selling it to pharmaceutical companies so they can easily manage their patent application documents.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Beam Pattadon

    [Summary] Successfully getting lead users is different from successfully entering mainstream market. Traditional technological product adoption cycle has a huge flaw on its premise. It assumes that the adoption of the product will automatically diffuse from early users (technologist and visionary users) to followers (early majority, late majority, and laggard). In fact, we should concern about the different set of paradigm in which we use to attract and communicate with both group. Early users w [Summary] Successfully getting lead users is different from successfully entering mainstream market. Traditional technological product adoption cycle has a huge flaw on its premise. It assumes that the adoption of the product will automatically diffuse from early users (technologist and visionary users) to followers (early majority, late majority, and laggard). In fact, we should concern about the different set of paradigm in which we use to attract and communicate with both group. Early users will put their focus on technological breakthrough, aiming to achieve superior competitive advantage while taking higher risk. following users, except laggard, will focus more on stability of product innovation to ensure that they will not burn their money for the waste. A large chasm, the major obstacle to achieve mainstream market, occurs between visionary users and early majority. To deal with this, we need to 1) focus our product on niche target market (Remember : being large fish in the small pond is much better than being small fish in the large pond 2) position our product to be a part of existing market, but differentiate it from existing products 3) align core product within supportive value ecosystem (managing it as whole product) 4) set a reasonable price (using value-based or distribution-based pricing) and carefully manage the product through a set of well-selected distribution channels (ranging from salespersons to retail stores).

  15. 5 out of 5

    Nathanael

    I began this book exploring a product to launch and finished it working in the business services industry. This juxtaposition helped me make sense of Moore's analysis and see its limitations. For high-tech, or most new products, Moore is spot on. There is an adoption curve and the key challenge for success in these kinds of ventures is moving from early adopters to the mainstream. His strategy (summed as 'focus') is the way to conquer this challenge. For services, I'm not as sure. My business is d I began this book exploring a product to launch and finished it working in the business services industry. This juxtaposition helped me make sense of Moore's analysis and see its limitations. For high-tech, or most new products, Moore is spot on. There is an adoption curve and the key challenge for success in these kinds of ventures is moving from early adopters to the mainstream. His strategy (summed as 'focus') is the way to conquer this challenge. For services, I'm not as sure. My business is defined as singular events: consultation meetings, coaching sessions, and drafting language for others to deliver. While his advice (narrow focus leads to strong results) does not yet resonate with me. I'm still at the stage of figuring out what I do best and what customers need most. Frankly, most small service businesses (singular self-employed ventures) stay in this stage. Here we tinker, bring others in to solve tough problems. We never reach a 'mainstream.' And we shouldn't: when you can mass-produce professional services, you lose the real value created. All that said, Moore was an entertaining and refreshing read: high-tech (and new product) folks must take him in.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Neelesh Marik

    This is certainly one of the most insightful business books i have ever read. It is of biblical importance to anyone in the technology business, especially operating in a B2B scenario. Apart from a cogent theoretical framework, it provides high practical, and actionable advice on how to move from one segment to the next in a technology adoption life cycle. It has certainly shown me the wrong assumptions we have made in our own business, and why. The book helps consultants create a concrete service This is certainly one of the most insightful business books i have ever read. It is of biblical importance to anyone in the technology business, especially operating in a B2B scenario. Apart from a cogent theoretical framework, it provides high practical, and actionable advice on how to move from one segment to the next in a technology adoption life cycle. It has certainly shown me the wrong assumptions we have made in our own business, and why. The book helps consultants create a concrete service offering to start-up clients who need advice on their go-to-market and organizational strategy. Full five stars on this book. I look forward to meeting Geoffrey Moore sometime to pay him my compliments for this great piece of work

  17. 4 out of 5

    Cameron

    Every MBA that I know has since told me that this is a classic, and I can see why. I never knew where the concept of early adopters and the technology adoption life cycle came from. The book is well written, has a compelling concept -- the "chasm" that must be crossed from visionaries and innovators to mainstream use in tech companies and that this crossing requires completely different techniques and types of people -- and is SHORT. I love short business books. Thanks to Will, my sculptor/altern Every MBA that I know has since told me that this is a classic, and I can see why. I never knew where the concept of early adopters and the technology adoption life cycle came from. The book is well written, has a compelling concept -- the "chasm" that must be crossed from visionaries and innovators to mainstream use in tech companies and that this crossing requires completely different techniques and types of people -- and is SHORT. I love short business books. Thanks to Will, my sculptor/alternative energy consulting/visionary friend for recommending this. It has all sorts of interesting implications, well outside of just the tech world for areas as diverse as community building and a career as an artist.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dmytro Shteflyuk

    I have never stopped to think about how a company gets from an early product into the mainstream, even tho I have been working in tech for ages. Have experienced the chasm so many times, but this is the first time I hear the word itself and had no clue that this is a normal growth process, and there is a logical explanation for what is happening. There are too many eye-opening ideas, including (but not limited to) product lifetime stages, target audiences segmentation, tips on how to cross the c I have never stopped to think about how a company gets from an early product into the mainstream, even tho I have been working in tech for ages. Have experienced the chasm so many times, but this is the first time I hear the word itself and had no clue that this is a normal growth process, and there is a logical explanation for what is happening. There are too many eye-opening ideas, including (but not limited to) product lifetime stages, target audiences segmentation, tips on how to cross the chasm, and to my surprise – dealing with early startup employees vs product ownership. I don't think the world will ever be the same again. Work in a startup? Read it. Building a startup? Well, you should have already read it.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jacob Wighton

    I picked this up thinking it was a mountaineering book, based on the title. Turns out it’s actually about marketing high-tech products in a B2B context. I thought this was really well written. I’ve had it recommended by a number of lecturers and I can see why. The main idea is that breaking into mainstream markets is best achieved by first narrowing the firm’s focus to a specific segment where the product can be established as the clear leader. Although the subject matter gets a little dry, Moore’ I picked this up thinking it was a mountaineering book, based on the title. Turns out it’s actually about marketing high-tech products in a B2B context. I thought this was really well written. I’ve had it recommended by a number of lecturers and I can see why. The main idea is that breaking into mainstream markets is best achieved by first narrowing the firm’s focus to a specific segment where the product can be established as the clear leader. Although the subject matter gets a little dry, Moore’s attempts at jokes keep things entertaining. He also writes in a way that shows the broad applicability of his ideas (outside high-tech B2B selling). “As the kids like to say, What’s up with that?”

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian Gebski

    Classic & a-must-get-familiar-with for all interested in building high-tech product. Why "a-must-get-familiar-with" but not "a-must-read"? Because the concept presented is very interesting & vital, but the book itself is at most average. The parts worth the greatest attention are 0-20% & 50-60%, the rest is a bit boring & repetitive, but fortunately not outdated (latest edition was updated in early 2010s). Another slice of advice: this is a _marketing_ book. Vast background on the subject is not r Classic & a-must-get-familiar-with for all interested in building high-tech product. Why "a-must-get-familiar-with" but not "a-must-read"? Because the concept presented is very interesting & vital, but the book itself is at most average. The parts worth the greatest attention are 0-20% & 50-60%, the rest is a bit boring & repetitive, but fortunately not outdated (latest edition was updated in early 2010s). Another slice of advice: this is a _marketing_ book. Vast background on the subject is not required, but you have to keep that in mind: be warned.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Viral

    I think this a great fundamentals book for any technologist or product manager (not mutually exclusive) to read. There are some really evergreen pointers on developing markets, product positioning and more. It's clear that a lot of product strategy books drew inspiration from Crossing the Chasm. One drawback is that there are some outdated references and examples, but most are still relevant. I think this a great fundamentals book for any technologist or product manager (not mutually exclusive) to read. There are some really evergreen pointers on developing markets, product positioning and more. It's clear that a lot of product strategy books drew inspiration from Crossing the Chasm. One drawback is that there are some outdated references and examples, but most are still relevant.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ana Rodrigues

    This book peaked my interested when I saw this graph and book reference in the Cloud Native Computing Foundation website. I had the opportunity to pick this book up from a little library in the company that I work at, and I thought why not? Although I am not interested in marketing, it was very interesting to learn about the Technology Adoption Life Cycle. The history of some companies was also nice, but it fell flat for the ones that I had never even heard of the company nor their products. Sadly, This book peaked my interested when I saw this graph and book reference in the Cloud Native Computing Foundation website. I had the opportunity to pick this book up from a little library in the company that I work at, and I thought why not? Although I am not interested in marketing, it was very interesting to learn about the Technology Adoption Life Cycle. The history of some companies was also nice, but it fell flat for the ones that I had never even heard of the company nor their products. Sadly, I completely lost interest in the book about 60% of the way through.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Jake Meadows

    Good book. I didn’t realize it was B2B-focused until I started reading it. Definitely most relevant to B2B software sales. A foundational book for strategy but I think there might be better ones available now that more fully incorporate changes in marketing strategy caused by the Internet (or, as the book calls it, the World Wide Web). Enjoyed a lot of the simplicity in definitions given. Many other works/articles/books obviously take inspiration and derive from the book, so I especially enjoyed Good book. I didn’t realize it was B2B-focused until I started reading it. Definitely most relevant to B2B software sales. A foundational book for strategy but I think there might be better ones available now that more fully incorporate changes in marketing strategy caused by the Internet (or, as the book calls it, the World Wide Web). Enjoyed a lot of the simplicity in definitions given. Many other works/articles/books obviously take inspiration and derive from the book, so I especially enjoyed reading this as source material.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pedro Henriques

    Most of the concepts have now been ingrained into anyone working in business development. Still a good read as a practical guide to anymore bringing a product to the mainstream market after early success. Not a relevant book to the general public. Most important ideas will probably be 'owning the niche' early on and the need to adapt the org and sales strategy as the technology adoption lifecycle progresses. Most of the concepts have now been ingrained into anyone working in business development. Still a good read as a practical guide to anymore bringing a product to the mainstream market after early success. Not a relevant book to the general public. Most important ideas will probably be 'owning the niche' early on and the need to adapt the org and sales strategy as the technology adoption lifecycle progresses.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Vagelis Kotsonis

    Maybe the most useful book an entrepreneur can read. It is a must read for anyone that is in the business of developing and selling products. The thing I really loved about this book is its structure. Every chapter has specific goals and in the end of each chapter a checklist with actions to do makes it a handbook for success in what you do! It is not the kind of book you read once, but the book that you go back every time you want to rethink strategic development of your company.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Leonardo Longo

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Geoffrey reviews the prevailing High-Tech Marketing Model presenting solid reflections of a chasm period of little to no growth when moving from a market of visionaries to pragmatists. He not only presents tactics on how to prepare a strategy for crossing the chasm (target customers, whole product development, partners & allies, competition and positioning), but also comes with valuable insights on how to manage the company's finances and people through this period of transition. Geoffrey reviews the prevailing High-Tech Marketing Model presenting solid reflections of a chasm period of little to no growth when moving from a market of visionaries to pragmatists. He not only presents tactics on how to prepare a strategy for crossing the chasm (target customers, whole product development, partners & allies, competition and positioning), but also comes with valuable insights on how to manage the company's finances and people through this period of transition.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hung Nguyen

    Essential reading for any B2B entrepreneur. Moore's principles for "crossing the chasm," - the critical period between marketing to early adopters and more pragmatic buyers - are extremely compelling and practical. I found the examples and case studies relatable and useful, and will revisit again and again. Plus, my old company Visible Measures got a great shoutout in it. Essential reading for any B2B entrepreneur. Moore's principles for "crossing the chasm," - the critical period between marketing to early adopters and more pragmatic buyers - are extremely compelling and practical. I found the examples and case studies relatable and useful, and will revisit again and again. Plus, my old company Visible Measures got a great shoutout in it.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ties

    Highly recommended marketing strategy book. I think it holds up extremely well, if not being more applicable than ever with more and more companies and businesses effectively being hight tech businesses. The authors examples and insights have since mostly been proven. Also very impressive. If this doesn't inspire thinking about your marketing strategy and efforts I don't know what will. Highly recommended marketing strategy book. I think it holds up extremely well, if not being more applicable than ever with more and more companies and businesses effectively being hight tech businesses. The authors examples and insights have since mostly been proven. Also very impressive. If this doesn't inspire thinking about your marketing strategy and efforts I don't know what will.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Kelsey

    This is the first marketing book I've read, so I don't have much to compare it with, but to be completely honest, this book was a drag to read. At the very least, I learned about the chasm that exists between the early market and the mainstream market, and I learned Geoffrey Moore's strategy for getting technology companies across that chasm as quickly as possible. This is the first marketing book I've read, so I don't have much to compare it with, but to be completely honest, this book was a drag to read. At the very least, I learned about the chasm that exists between the early market and the mainstream market, and I learned Geoffrey Moore's strategy for getting technology companies across that chasm as quickly as possible.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Paweł Górski

    One of the best marketing books I’ve read. If I have to pick a single thing I’ve learnt, that’s probably about the importance of finding and winning a single market segment and focus all resources on that goal in order to pave the way to the mainstream market.

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