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Le bestiaire du crépuscule

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Pour les enfants du quartier, le parc est un inoffensif jardin public. Mais pour son gardien, c'est un nid de sombres créatures qu'il est le seul à voir : asocial et atteint d'un solide trouble de la rêverie compulsive, Providence s'est donné pour mission de protéger les promeneurs malgré eux. Sa tâche se complique lorsqu'un livre étrange sorti des eaux troubles du lac lib Pour les enfants du quartier, le parc est un inoffensif jardin public. Mais pour son gardien, c'est un nid de sombres créatures qu'il est le seul à voir : asocial et atteint d'un solide trouble de la rêverie compulsive, Providence s'est donné pour mission de protéger les promeneurs malgré eux. Sa tâche se complique lorsqu'un livre étrange sorti des eaux troubles du lac libère un bestiaire terrifiant et attire l'attention des très louches services psycho-sanitaires... Talonné par une nouvelle directrice bien plus versée dans le jargon du management que dans l'occulte et déterminée à gérer le parc comme une véritable start-up, le gardien lutte contre l'appel d'un autre monde : noyé dans les brumes du lac, le reflet d'une étrange maison où il serait enfin en paix l'attire irrésistiblement... Une sublime variation sur l'univers et le personnage de Lovecraft, rendant hommage à l'imaginaire sous toutes ses formes. Après Acqua Alta, L'Arbre aux pies et Ornithomaniacs, Daria Schmitt propose le plus abouti de ses albums, porté par un dessin splendidement fouillé au service d'une intrigue aux multiples rebondissements et références.


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Pour les enfants du quartier, le parc est un inoffensif jardin public. Mais pour son gardien, c'est un nid de sombres créatures qu'il est le seul à voir : asocial et atteint d'un solide trouble de la rêverie compulsive, Providence s'est donné pour mission de protéger les promeneurs malgré eux. Sa tâche se complique lorsqu'un livre étrange sorti des eaux troubles du lac lib Pour les enfants du quartier, le parc est un inoffensif jardin public. Mais pour son gardien, c'est un nid de sombres créatures qu'il est le seul à voir : asocial et atteint d'un solide trouble de la rêverie compulsive, Providence s'est donné pour mission de protéger les promeneurs malgré eux. Sa tâche se complique lorsqu'un livre étrange sorti des eaux troubles du lac libère un bestiaire terrifiant et attire l'attention des très louches services psycho-sanitaires... Talonné par une nouvelle directrice bien plus versée dans le jargon du management que dans l'occulte et déterminée à gérer le parc comme une véritable start-up, le gardien lutte contre l'appel d'un autre monde : noyé dans les brumes du lac, le reflet d'une étrange maison où il serait enfin en paix l'attire irrésistiblement... Une sublime variation sur l'univers et le personnage de Lovecraft, rendant hommage à l'imaginaire sous toutes ses formes. Après Acqua Alta, L'Arbre aux pies et Ornithomaniacs, Daria Schmitt propose le plus abouti de ses albums, porté par un dessin splendidement fouillé au service d'une intrigue aux multiples rebondissements et références.

30 review for Le bestiaire du crépuscule

  1. 4 out of 5

    Emily Sarah

    No. Just no. Problematic. What… what did I just read? I have thoughts. Firstly let’s start with the only thing I liked, the artwork; the artwork is so damn breathtaking. Some seriously bloody beautiful pieces and an interwoven pop of colour that adds so much depth to the lands. I get the intention of the storyline but there’s some major issues and things we need to talk about here. One being; does the author know all sides of H.P. Lovecraft? I ask this because H.P. Lovecraft, whilst a brilliant wr No. Just no. Problematic. What… what did I just read? I have thoughts. Firstly let’s start with the only thing I liked, the artwork; the artwork is so damn breathtaking. Some seriously bloody beautiful pieces and an interwoven pop of colour that adds so much depth to the lands. I get the intention of the storyline but there’s some major issues and things we need to talk about here. One being; does the author know all sides of H.P. Lovecraft? I ask this because H.P. Lovecraft, whilst a brilliant writer was also incredibly racist with many antisemitic tropes woven into his works. Ones one would stereotypically wish to avoid or correct. Or at least acknowledge. What worries me is this author somehow leaned into their love of Lovecraft so much that this work is (perhaps accidentally) HUGELY problematic. And not only that… their chosen story is also mimicking huge issues. So what are they? First of all let’s talk about the plot (we will have some vague spoilers here so skip if you don’t want to read them) 1) The plot follows H.P. Lovecraft who is deemed to be mentally ill by the ‘mental health services’ for his ‘beliefs and delusions’ of a world in which his stories come to life.’ They believe the book he wrote is spreading some kind of issue amongst their worlds and that he is insane, so they try to take him in, and also we have the plot of people prying the literature from his hands and stealing his written works to stop the ‘spread’. Now, the struggles to protect this literature and his beliefs are the main theme. Rather reminiscent of the holocaust, with literature being deemed ‘perverted’ and stolen. I thought maybe I was jumping to conclusions or inferring this dramatically. But then… then we had the mental health services themselves. A man named Zadok who wishes to stop H.P.’s corrupt behaviour. Zadok is a Hebrew name meaning ‘just’ or ‘righteous.’ This is a serious issue. The one person we are introduced to in this book as having a Hebrew name is a morally corrupt ‘mental health’ officer trying to capture a man for having different views and basically imprison him. The reversed victim antisemitic take was really something. (He is described as being draconian and zoophobic, and portrayed as a villain.) It left a sour taste in my mouth that seriously ruined the art. The art is gorgeous, captivating and so true to H.P. Lovecraft. I just wish the literature proportion and storyline had been either researched with caution to his views or plotted out in a way that wasn’t so truly cringey to read. I mean, I’m not sure why this hasn’t been pointed out in other reviews but I can see how it may be missed if you weren’t aware of his problematic issues and also of the origin of the name Zadok (Zadoc alternate spelling.) I’m just unsure how this made it through sensitivity reads without being brought up. Also there’s an awful lot of ableism in there, and I get it’s meant to be a theme but it only made it lean more so into being reminiscent of the holocaust with the attack on disabled people. I just… I’m a little let down this hasn’t been considered prior. Especially as an homage to Lovecraft of sorts. I was looking forward to this but I couldn’t help but feel uncomfortable as all those plot points (intentionally or not.) Maybe I’m inferring it incorrectly, but I couldn’t help but feel very stilled by the parallels. TW’s// Scenes depicting almost drowning, ableism, ableist slurs, racism, antisemitism, plot reminiscent of the holocaust but centring a non Jewish man who himself was antisemitic & racist.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Renee Godding

    Let me start off this review by saying: I am by no means a “graphic-novel-connoisseur”. I’ve always wanted to enjoy this genre, as I love illustrated art, but as a way of story-telling I’ve never been able to get into it. I can count on one hand the amount of graphic novels I’ve finished and enjoyed, which makes it even more of a compliment to Daria Schmitt’s debut that it is one of them. The Monstrous Dreams of Mr. Providence is a Lovecraftian inspired story, following the titular caretaker of Let me start off this review by saying: I am by no means a “graphic-novel-connoisseur”. I’ve always wanted to enjoy this genre, as I love illustrated art, but as a way of story-telling I’ve never been able to get into it. I can count on one hand the amount of graphic novels I’ve finished and enjoyed, which makes it even more of a compliment to Daria Schmitt’s debut that it is one of them. The Monstrous Dreams of Mr. Providence is a Lovecraftian inspired story, following the titular caretaker of a seemingly ordinary city park. However, at night, the Eldridge entities that make the park its home immerge; entities that only Mr. Providence seems to be able to see. It’s up to him, with the help of his companion-cats, to protect the unsuspecting parks visitors from what lurks beneath. The characters and story didn’t quite do it for me, but the stunning artwork and dreamlike surreal quality of the setting were enough to give this book at least 4 stars. Schmitts art style and her use of contrast and colour is completely up my alley, and many individual panels were beautiful enough that I’d hang a framed print of it on my wall. I will probably never become an actual graphic-novel reader and that’s okay. Not every genre is going to be for everybody, and this one isn’t for me. That being said, I really enjoyed this little side-step outside my comfort zone and will for sure be checking out Daria Schmitts (other) art in the future. Thanks to Netgalley for providing me with an ARC in exchange for an honest review, as wel as G from Bookroast for creating the Magical Readathon and “forcing me” to read outside my usual genres.

  3. 5 out of 5

    plainzt

    In this graphic novel, we follow the story of Mr. Providence who is a caretaker at a city park. The park is full of bizarre beings that wake at night, and Providence, despite the concerns of his business-minded new manager, is working to protect guests. This novel is a homage to the H.P. Lovecraft short story "The Strange High House in the Mist", which is provided at the end of the book. I am not a big fan of H.P. Lovecraft's works but the artwork, atmosphere, and story do honor the legacy of the In this graphic novel, we follow the story of Mr. Providence who is a caretaker at a city park. The park is full of bizarre beings that wake at night, and Providence, despite the concerns of his business-minded new manager, is working to protect guests. This novel is a homage to the H.P. Lovecraft short story "The Strange High House in the Mist", which is provided at the end of the book. I am not a big fan of H.P. Lovecraft's works but the artwork, atmosphere, and story do honor the legacy of the writer successfully. Thanks so much to NetGalley and Europe Comics for providing an ARC of this novel for reviewers.

  4. 5 out of 5

    mel

    RTC. Thanks to Europe Comics for the ARC and this opportunity!

  5. 4 out of 5

    Florence Mullot

    Un véritable OVNI. Je ne suis pas très au fait des œuvres de HP Lovecraft, je ne peux donc pas vraiment faire le parallèle avec Le bestiaire du crépuscule de Daria Schmitt, mais c’est clairement l’ambiance que l’auteur américain m’inspire. J’avais d’abord cru que Le bestiaire du crépuscule serait accès plus jeunesse, mais il n’en est rien. Nous plongeons dans un voyage fantastique où notre héros, Providence, gardien d’un parc, est bien décidé à protéger les visiteurs des monstres invisibles qui p Un véritable OVNI. Je ne suis pas très au fait des œuvres de HP Lovecraft, je ne peux donc pas vraiment faire le parallèle avec Le bestiaire du crépuscule de Daria Schmitt, mais c’est clairement l’ambiance que l’auteur américain m’inspire. J’avais d’abord cru que Le bestiaire du crépuscule serait accès plus jeunesse, mais il n’en est rien. Nous plongeons dans un voyage fantastique où notre héros, Providence, gardien d’un parc, est bien décidé à protéger les visiteurs des monstres invisibles qui peuplent son lieu de travail. Mais une trouvaille va le dévier de sa mission et devenir une obsession. On remarque tout de suite le style graphique de Daria Schmitt. Dense et fin à la fois, il prend plus de place que le texte et nous met tout de suite dans l’ambiance. Un mélange de folie, d’oppression et de fantaisie. Il y a une richesse incroyable dans les illustrations et j’adore encore plus les rares moments où la couleur entre en jeu. C’est un basculement entre la réalité et l’onirique saisissant. Les dessins à la fin de l’ouvrage sont une pure merveille. Un peu à la Alice au pays des merveilles, Providence est un homme à part, un brin excentrique qui parle à son chat Maldoror. Un duo que l’on adore rapidement, entre le côté borné du gardien et le sarcasme du chat. Il y a aussi ce non-sens et cet humour noir qui ajoutent un peu plus de ressemblance avec l’œuvre de Lewis Carroll. La directrice qui ne veut pas d’excentricité, mais qui est toujours sur son cheval même pendant les réunions, c’est de l’humour comme je l’aime. Sans connaître l’œuvre de HP Lovecraft, je pense que je suis passée à côté de pas mal de choses. Mais, j’ai tout de même apprécié cette lecture assez étrange où l’on n’arrive pas vraiment à savoir où la frontière entre la réalité et le rêve se trouve. Pour moi, le gardien est HP Lovecraft et l’on y voit un homme et son imagination débordante qui parfois le déconnecte de la réalité. Il y a un côté inquiétant, mais la dérision ambiante adoucit clairement l’ensemble. La fin du Bestiaire du crépuscule contient une nouvelle « L’étrange maison haute dans la brume » de HP Lovecraft. Une nouvelle qui est en parallèle avec la bande dessinée, sans en être l’adaptation. Le fait d’avoir combiné les deux œuvres est clairement une bonne idée, et ouvre ainsi plus de compréhension. Une lecture qui sort de l’ordinaire. Je ne m’attendais pas du tout à cela, et parfois c’est une bonne chose d’être surprise, surtout en littérature.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    A park-keeper who both is and isn't Lovecraft* has to deal with a brash, buzzword-happy manager bent on modernisation, monsters only he knows lurk in the park, and worst of all, the general public, who will insist on activities which risk waking said monsters and, even if they didn't, would ruin the peace of the park. Oh, and he's assisted by a talking cat called Maldoror. The same premise with a different art style could easily have been a Viz strip, but the look here is more Chris Riddell on h A park-keeper who both is and isn't Lovecraft* has to deal with a brash, buzzword-happy manager bent on modernisation, monsters only he knows lurk in the park, and worst of all, the general public, who will insist on activities which risk waking said monsters and, even if they didn't, would ruin the peace of the park. Oh, and he's assisted by a talking cat called Maldoror. The same premise with a different art style could easily have been a Viz strip, but the look here is more Chris Riddell on his less comic stuff, maybe a hint of Charles Vess – gorgeous, eerie without being horrific, wry without quite being funny. As for the writing, well, like a lot of Europe Comics stuff I found it seesawed between unnecessarily opaque, and far too eager to show its working ("It may sound strange to you, but I feel a lot like one of these old pieces of junk. Like them I'm waiting for something, and the longer I wait, the older and dustier I become..."). But then it's not as if the scripts of US and UK comics don't have their funny little ways, so this may just be a case of it not being a storytelling grammar I grew up with. I'm not altogether convinced by the way it incorporates the full text of The Strange High House In The Mist within itself - there is a thematic overlap, but I don't know that the angles quite cohere. Still, you could say that was appropriately non-Euclidean, and there too the illustrations are gorgeous. *My second of those this week, an' all, after Cast A Deadly Spell. Private eye, park-keeper – what other professions beginning with P could have a maybe-Lovecraft? Please not proctologist. (Netgalley ARC)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Floresia

    Dibujos preciosos magníficos chulísimos!!🥺🥺🥺🥺 me ha encantado

  8. 5 out of 5

    Peter Baran

    This is a singular piece of graphic fiction, with fine pen art aping Victorian book etchings, though dark, a dank and thoroughly befitting this riff on Lovecraftian lore. Its a little odd in fact that the brief but dense tale of a mysterious park does indeed end up being a prequel to an actual Lovecraft tale (The Strange High House In the Mist), as if comparisons were impossible to dodge, or were already baked in. It is certainly one where certain panel and splash pages are made to be poured ove This is a singular piece of graphic fiction, with fine pen art aping Victorian book etchings, though dark, a dank and thoroughly befitting this riff on Lovecraftian lore. Its a little odd in fact that the brief but dense tale of a mysterious park does indeed end up being a prequel to an actual Lovecraft tale (The Strange High House In the Mist), as if comparisons were impossible to dodge, or were already baked in. It is certainly one where certain panel and splash pages are made to be poured over, if not for detail but for the wash of eyes and tentacles and goo (it is firmly black and which until the supernatural comes in when a sort of colour out of space intrudes). Mr Providence is the caretaker of a park, who lives with his cat and sees the supernatural in many turns. old, cantankerous and somewhat erratic in his work, he has drawn the wrath of his new business buzzword spouting manager, and doesn't seem all that popular with park users or co-workers. During the course of this day he takes a dip in the pond, finds a magical book and encounters a lot of - well tentacles and eyes. The strangeness continues until the book reaches its odd end - with the Lovecraft tale. Its an interesting piece of work, particularly if you like this kind of art style (I can't say I am a huge fan of the plain B&W renderings, though once it starts getting trippy I am more interesting). But the story itself does end up just being prologue, and Mr Providence is a pretty passive observer of the weirdness around him. The manager character is a very one dimensional joke on management culture, and whilst by the end there is a little more nuance to her, it all feels to nothing. What's more the actual connective tissue between this and the Lovecraft tale is slim. Its probably worth it most for the illustration, and certainly just excerpting the illustrated Lovecraft really gets to the heart of his obsessions. But as a piece on its own it wasn't really my thing.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jenna

    **I was provided an electronic ARC via the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for honest review.** Actual rating: 3.5 Daria Schmitt presents an adult graphic novel inspired by HP Lovecraft's "The Strange House High in the Mist" with The Strange Dreams of Mr Providence. Readers follow Providence in his role as caretaker of a park as well as some other individuals that work and visit there. Schmitt's art style is absolutely intricate and gorgeous. Her interpretation of where and when to use colo **I was provided an electronic ARC via the publisher through NetGalley in exchange for honest review.** Actual rating: 3.5 Daria Schmitt presents an adult graphic novel inspired by HP Lovecraft's "The Strange House High in the Mist" with The Strange Dreams of Mr Providence. Readers follow Providence in his role as caretaker of a park as well as some other individuals that work and visit there. Schmitt's art style is absolutely intricate and gorgeous. Her interpretation of where and when to use color, and the choices to use mostly secondary or tertiary colors rather than primary is simply superb. Likewise, the black and white "real life" of the book is so heavily laden with nuance and detail. It was the artwork that absolutely brought this work to life. I did not mind Schmitt's interpretation of Lovecraft, and felt that she really did seem to understand the original text, likely far more than I did. I did think the overall pace of the story was slow and wandering despite the concerning things taking place, which limited my overall attachment to the story itself. In all, I enjoyed my time with this graphic novel and would be happy to recommend it to Lovecraft fans or to fans of beautiful art in graphic novels.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Melanie

    I received an eARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I'll talk about the things I can do first. The illustrations of this graphic novel are equally gorgeous and strangely awful. All the scenery and backgrounds are incredibly detailed and complex, and the fish and octopus imagery is gorgeous. The use of color to bring a feeling of dread is masterful. However, the people (their facial expressions and their body movements) are more than just a little odd. I'll also say that there is a I received an eARC from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I'll talk about the things I can do first. The illustrations of this graphic novel are equally gorgeous and strangely awful. All the scenery and backgrounds are incredibly detailed and complex, and the fish and octopus imagery is gorgeous. The use of color to bring a feeling of dread is masterful. However, the people (their facial expressions and their body movements) are more than just a little odd. I'll also say that there is a very disquieting feeling to this narrative that is totally intentional and that it works. Having said all that, I have no idea what I read, or why it was written. I have a notion that I'm missing something important, that I'm either too dumb or not culturally aware enough to get something intrinsic to this narrative, but I just don't know what I don't know. I don't understand how the whole short story that's inserted into this story connects with this and honestly... I don't care enough to find out. If you like creepy vibes you can give this a go, but be prepared to do some sleuthing to get a proper narrative.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    This is an idiosyncratic, graphic prologue to the H.P. Lovecraft short story "The Strange High House in the Mist", the full text of which is presented toward the end of the book. Lots of Lovecraft's work is printed in modern editions that are preceded by prologues, forwards, and introductions of varying degrees of interest and insight. A hundred pages of startling illustration and storytelling, though, is a rather remarkable way to introduce Lovecraft's story. The two, in combination, make for a This is an idiosyncratic, graphic prologue to the H.P. Lovecraft short story "The Strange High House in the Mist", the full text of which is presented toward the end of the book. Lots of Lovecraft's work is printed in modern editions that are preceded by prologues, forwards, and introductions of varying degrees of interest and insight. A hundred pages of startling illustration and storytelling, though, is a rather remarkable way to introduce Lovecraft's story. The two, in combination, make for a real treat for a Lovecraft admirer, especially because the short story is less on the horror side and rather reflects a tone that approaches "playful", or at least as playful as Lovecraft could ever get. An exceptionally interesting, (and technically very accomplished), find. (Please note that I received a free advance ecopy of this book without a review requirement, or any influence regarding review content should I choose to post a review. Apart from that I have no connection at all to either the author or the publisher of this book.)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sam

    This book was unlike any graphic novel I’ve read before. For one thing, the art is incredibly detailed. The artist did not skimp on a single panel. Really, every page could have been wall art. The use of color was also amazing and really contributed to the story telling. Second, this graphic novel includes the full text of a short story by H.P. Lovecraft near the end. I was not expecting that, but I was pleasantly surprised. I’ve never read Lovecraft before, so this was a beautifully illustrated This book was unlike any graphic novel I’ve read before. For one thing, the art is incredibly detailed. The artist did not skimp on a single panel. Really, every page could have been wall art. The use of color was also amazing and really contributed to the story telling. Second, this graphic novel includes the full text of a short story by H.P. Lovecraft near the end. I was not expecting that, but I was pleasantly surprised. I’ve never read Lovecraft before, so this was a beautifully illustrated introduction to his work. Overall, I would recommend this to fans of H.P. Lovecraft, and to anyone who admires intricately illustrated graphic novels. Thank you to Europe Comics and NetGalley for providing the ARC.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Aria

    Actual rating: 3.5 stars An absolutely gorgeous graphic novel by Daria Schmitt. I loved the contrast between the monochrome reality and coloured surreal world, and how, instead of black and white, colours are used as an indicator of something horrific happening. The art style creates a strong atmosphere in The Monstrous Dreams of Mr. Providence However, I'm not too entirely sold on the notion that this graphic novel is a prelude to Lovecraft's The Strange High House in the Mist (the short Actual rating: 3.5 stars An absolutely gorgeous graphic novel by Daria Schmitt. I loved the contrast between the monochrome reality and coloured surreal world, and how, instead of black and white, colours are used as an indicator of something horrific happening. The art style creates a strong atmosphere in The Monstrous Dreams of Mr. Providence However, I'm not too entirely sold on the notion that this graphic novel is a prelude to Lovecraft's The Strange High House in the Mist (the short story is included in its entirety within the graphic novel), as there seems to be a disconnect between the two despite elements linking them. I keep feeling as though there is a deeper, more complicated meaning to the graphic novel and Lovecraft's short story, but am simply unable to decipher what that meaning is right now. One day, I'll return to this and hopefully figure it out. Thank you so much Europe Comics and Netgalley for providing me a copy of this in exchange for an honest review!

  14. 4 out of 5

    Caitlin

    The Monstrous Dreams of Mr. Providence is a unique and odd story from Daria Schmitt. Mr. Providence truly cares for his park and the creators within but he also has an inquisitive mind. Readers follow Mr. Providence on journey for answers when a book with no pages is discovered. The art style of this graphic novel is really cool and would be pretty rad to see animated. Thank you to Europe Comics & NetGalley for access to this work.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Vittoria

    Thank you NetGalley and Daria Schmitt for an eARC in exchange for an honest review! The artwork is something wonderful, I loved it so much. The problem is that I found the plot very difficult to understand and even the ending was not able to answer some questions that remained pending. But, despite this, I found the graphics something truly unique, with images that alternated between colors and black and white.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Ioana

    Thank you Netgalley for an arc of this book in exchange for an honest review. This was such an interesting, intriguing and confusing work. The Monstrous Dreams of Mr. Providence takes inspiration from H. P. Lovecraft and it even has a Lovecraft story at the end (it is masterfully embedded in the whole plot of the graphic novel). The story follows a park caretaker that has a talking cat. The park is something completely different for Mr Providence - he see the true aspects of it. Such a wonderful Thank you Netgalley for an arc of this book in exchange for an honest review. This was such an interesting, intriguing and confusing work. The Monstrous Dreams of Mr. Providence takes inspiration from H. P. Lovecraft and it even has a Lovecraft story at the end (it is masterfully embedded in the whole plot of the graphic novel). The story follows a park caretaker that has a talking cat. The park is something completely different for Mr Providence - he see the true aspects of it. Such a wonderful experience. The art of this graphic novel is really unique: very detailed mostly black and white with some exceptions that make everything so beautiful. I didn't give this 5 stars because I am still confused by some of the aspects of the story, but I feel like this is entirely up to myself because I am not familiar with H. P. Lovecraft's stories. With this in mind I still highly recommend this book!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Naga

    J'ai pas tout compris. C'était beau, mais très étrange. J'ai pas tout compris. C'était beau, mais très étrange.

  18. 4 out of 5

    mas

  19. 5 out of 5

    Boelen

  20. 4 out of 5

    Millefolium Potiron

  21. 4 out of 5

    hülya

  22. 4 out of 5

    Terrorem Vitriol

  23. 4 out of 5

    Kaliswen

  24. 5 out of 5

    Paul Harris

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chalemaow

  26. 5 out of 5

    Pierre Derycke

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ije the Devourer of Books

  28. 4 out of 5

    Juan

  29. 5 out of 5

    FushigiMini

  30. 4 out of 5

    mar✰

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