website statistics What’s The Furthest Place From Here?, Vol. 1: Get Lost - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

What’s The Furthest Place From Here?, Vol. 1: Get Lost

Availability: Ready to download

From Eisner nominated artist Tyler Boss (4 Kids Walk Into A Bank, Dead Dog's Bite) and bestselling writer Matthew Rosenberg (DC vs. Vampires, Uncanny X-Men) comes an epic adventure about growing up and getting lost at the end of the world. When 16 year-old Sid goes missing in the wastelands, it's up to the members of her gang to try to discover what happened. But what they From Eisner nominated artist Tyler Boss (4 Kids Walk Into A Bank, Dead Dog's Bite) and bestselling writer Matthew Rosenberg (DC vs. Vampires, Uncanny X-Men) comes an epic adventure about growing up and getting lost at the end of the world. When 16 year-old Sid goes missing in the wastelands, it's up to the members of her gang to try to discover what happened. But what they find is a whole world beyond anything they could imagine. Like Lord of the Rings meets Lord of the Flies, or John Carpenter by way of John Hughes, this series smashes together sci-fi and fantasy with elements of comedy, horror, and mystery for an emotional coming-of-age story unlike anything you've read before. This oversized volume collects the first arc of the breakout hit series James Tynion IV calls "What the future of comics SHOULD feel like." Collects issues 1-6.


Compare

From Eisner nominated artist Tyler Boss (4 Kids Walk Into A Bank, Dead Dog's Bite) and bestselling writer Matthew Rosenberg (DC vs. Vampires, Uncanny X-Men) comes an epic adventure about growing up and getting lost at the end of the world. When 16 year-old Sid goes missing in the wastelands, it's up to the members of her gang to try to discover what happened. But what they From Eisner nominated artist Tyler Boss (4 Kids Walk Into A Bank, Dead Dog's Bite) and bestselling writer Matthew Rosenberg (DC vs. Vampires, Uncanny X-Men) comes an epic adventure about growing up and getting lost at the end of the world. When 16 year-old Sid goes missing in the wastelands, it's up to the members of her gang to try to discover what happened. But what they find is a whole world beyond anything they could imagine. Like Lord of the Rings meets Lord of the Flies, or John Carpenter by way of John Hughes, this series smashes together sci-fi and fantasy with elements of comedy, horror, and mystery for an emotional coming-of-age story unlike anything you've read before. This oversized volume collects the first arc of the breakout hit series James Tynion IV calls "What the future of comics SHOULD feel like." Collects issues 1-6.

30 review for What’s The Furthest Place From Here?, Vol. 1: Get Lost

  1. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    A dark and weird series that is also somehow lighthearted and funny at the same time. It's kind of difficult to explain, but it's undeniably strange. Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6 Total review score: 2.92 A dark and weird series that is also somehow lighthearted and funny at the same time. It's kind of difficult to explain, but it's undeniably strange. Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6 Total review score: 2.92

  2. 5 out of 5

    RP Madison

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. When I blind bought this graphic novel I had high hopes based on praise listed on the back cover. Upon opening it I was delighted at the artwork as well as the setting and thought 'wow this looks like it's gonna be right at my alley' but I was enormously disappointed. There's a lot of really interesting LOOKING characters in this story and they're doing a lot of mysterious type things but by the end of it I really didn't care about any of them as they were slaughtered or dispensed into different When I blind bought this graphic novel I had high hopes based on praise listed on the back cover. Upon opening it I was delighted at the artwork as well as the setting and thought 'wow this looks like it's gonna be right at my alley' but I was enormously disappointed. There's a lot of really interesting LOOKING characters in this story and they're doing a lot of mysterious type things but by the end of it I really didn't care about any of them as they were slaughtered or dispensed into different factions of this whole new post apocalyptic 'Warriors' meets 'The Running Man' like society. Maybe I need to avoid the 'T for teen' comics from now on but this just didn't do it for me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Wil Carpenter

    An engaging, but somewhat over-baked post-apocalyptic romp from Matthew Rosenberg and Tyler Boss. The story starts strong, but starts to drag under its own weight by the midway point, with a few glimmering moments managing to keep you clinging on for more. Tyler Boss’ artwork is stunning, as ever, and the volume is worth investigating for his impeccable line work alone.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sarospice

    It's time to write that dystopian future story where only the old survive, because the young have such weak immune systems. Yeah, that way when we name check Joy Division or Descendents or, heaven help, Hall & Oates, you'd get the feeling they'll know some songs. What? The Road?! It's time to write that dystopian future story where only the old survive, because the young have such weak immune systems. Yeah, that way when we name check Joy Division or Descendents or, heaven help, Hall & Oates, you'd get the feeling they'll know some songs. What? The Road?!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Connor

    I'm really not sure how I feel after reading this. I guess confused? This book kind of throws you into a different world, and I felt like I was one step behind the whole time, just trying to figure out what was going on. It does not hold your hand. That being said, what I understood interested me. I think a second read-through might help clear things up; I'm even noticing things as I'm leafing through it while writing this. There are short chapters; some of them are only 1 page long. There are s I'm really not sure how I feel after reading this. I guess confused? This book kind of throws you into a different world, and I felt like I was one step behind the whole time, just trying to figure out what was going on. It does not hold your hand. That being said, what I understood interested me. I think a second read-through might help clear things up; I'm even noticing things as I'm leafing through it while writing this. There are short chapters; some of them are only 1 page long. There are some humorous bits too. This volume covers an arc, but there are definitely loose ends that would hint at another volume. I do want to read more. I'm curious where this story goes. I like the artwork a lot. (view spoiler)[I'm going to attempt a plot summary to jog my memory when I read the next volume. It's a post-apocalyptic world populated by teens and kids with no adults. Maybe people die when they reach a certain age? There are mythical beings called Strangers who dress in black with mummy heads and seem to rule over the world, but they can be killed. The kids are grouped into "families", each with a special interest or role. This story centers on the Academy, who like music records. An older member, Slug, comes back to the record store hideout injured. He gives Sid (who might be pregnant?) a map and a gun before he dies. The Strangers come take his body while the Academy has a fight with the Bankers (who wear pig masks) and Sid shoots one of them. The next day, the Academy discovers that Sid is gone, and they start searching for her. They check out the bank, but it's empty except for a young boy named Merrill who joins the group. Outside, they run into the Boys in Blue (wannabe cops), but they push over their bus and run away. When they get back, they discover their record store hideout has been burned down. This leads the group on a nebulous journey throughout the land as they look for a new home. They encounter weird animal people in the woods, creepy employees as the Market, eerie children pretending to be elderly at the Bold Folks Home, and eventually end up at the Carnival. After some hijinks at the Carnival, Alabama (the leader of the Academy) makes a deal with the Boys in Blue to split up the Academy as punishment for shooting someone, trespassing at the bank, killing a Stranger, and just generally causing a ruckus. After most of the kids are picked, a few members of the Academy escape. Prufrock (bald, flannel, losing teeth), Mallory (shorts with tights underneath), and Merrill (Pigbaby) drive away in a Ferris wheel car and pick up someone wearing Sid's jacket. Oberon (stutter, mohawk) is thought dead, but hides and maybe asks for help from the animal people in the woods. Alabama (crop top and jacket, flat top) and Lafayette (tall quiet kid with overalls) get sent to the zoo keepers to be put in a cage. Sid is shown in a medical facility listening to a record. (hide spoiler)] Read for the Geekery's book club

  6. 4 out of 5

    Clint

    Really wanted to like this, especially after loving Rosenberg and Boss’s earlier 4 Kids Walk Into A Bank, but Rosenberg’s heavy reliance on genre tropes goes sour and Boss’s art isn’t enough to rescue the book. Rosenberg repurposed crime movie tropes into a new context that worked well for the middle school heist premise of 4 Kids, but the 80s cult film stuff here is basically just reused in the same way it’s been used before, and apparently without thought for how it fits together, resulting in Really wanted to like this, especially after loving Rosenberg and Boss’s earlier 4 Kids Walk Into A Bank, but Rosenberg’s heavy reliance on genre tropes goes sour and Boss’s art isn’t enough to rescue the book. Rosenberg repurposed crime movie tropes into a new context that worked well for the middle school heist premise of 4 Kids, but the 80s cult film stuff here is basically just reused in the same way it’s been used before, and apparently without thought for how it fits together, resulting in a post-apocalypse story that’s boring and unclear. It’s also so self-assured in how cool it is, and maybe it is for someone who haven’t seen all this stuff before in other comics and movies, but it’s such a half-assed rehash of disparate visual elements from those earlier stories and its confidence that it’s something hip and new makes the staleness that much more grating. The full-page chapter breaks that come every 3 or so pages are similarly grating, seemingly convinced that each scene is its own iconic moment, along with chapter titles that are a quote from the following scene. There are literally 45 of these, and there’s definitely not 45 iconic moments or quotes in its 250 pages. There’s also just bad writing flourishes, like kids who are glaringly uneducated randomly knowing words like “porcine” when Rosenberg wants one of them to land a witty comeback. More than anything, this reads a lot like what a 40 year old guy thinks is cool based on what was hip and throwback 20 years ago, which probably also explains why the core cast all look like scene kids from 20 years ago dressed like glammed-up versions of punk kids from 40 years ago. The main cast has a reverence for vinyl records despite being ignorant of pretty much all technology, and wouldn’t you know it, their taste almost exclusively overlaps with bands that would have aired on 120 Minutes in the late 80s/early 90s. There’s tiny recreations of album covers by Husker Du and Big Black and pre-Dookie Green Day, and it’s all just Ready Player One type shit for people who otherwise probably look down on Ready Player One’s whole corny schtick. Boss’s art still generally looks great, but it’s dragged down a bit by often zany coloring that’s trying to fit the vibe of the derivative genre story.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jack

    What if the characters from “Empire Records” were in “The Warriors”? The type of world-building where the characters make choices that make sense in the scene, and at every turn you find out that the world they’re in is bigger and weirder than you previously thought. At times sweet and earnest or psychedelic and nightmarish, but the real trick is that none of the kids think that there’s anything wrong because it’s the only world they’ve ever known. The art and design are just perfect, from giant What if the characters from “Empire Records” were in “The Warriors”? The type of world-building where the characters make choices that make sense in the scene, and at every turn you find out that the world they’re in is bigger and weirder than you previously thought. At times sweet and earnest or psychedelic and nightmarish, but the real trick is that none of the kids think that there’s anything wrong because it’s the only world they’ve ever known. The art and design are just perfect, from giant set pieces to tiny shifts in facial expressions to pacing that keeps you on the hook even when you don’t know what’s going on. There are lots of atmospheric and dialogue details that connect throughout the story and reward flipping back and forth to see how they come together. (Especially bc there’s no exposition-dump to put the pieces together for you.)

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ryan Roberts

    Love this series! What’s the Furthest Place From Here is responsible for getting me into comics, showing me that the medium is about more than just superheroes (how I didn’t realize this earlier, I have no clue). Since devouring the first 6 issues of WTFPFH I got my hands I everything I could find by the creators- 4 Kids Walk Into a Bank (also amazing), We Can Never Go Home (brutal and great), and Dead Dog’s Bite (bizarre and enthralling). What’s the Furthest Place From Here is an excellent read Love this series! What’s the Furthest Place From Here is responsible for getting me into comics, showing me that the medium is about more than just superheroes (how I didn’t realize this earlier, I have no clue). Since devouring the first 6 issues of WTFPFH I got my hands I everything I could find by the creators- 4 Kids Walk Into a Bank (also amazing), We Can Never Go Home (brutal and great), and Dead Dog’s Bite (bizarre and enthralling). What’s the Furthest Place From Here is an excellent read and the trade paperback is MASSIVE, making it feel like a collection of more than just 6 issues. Highly recommend!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alec Jensen 75

    One of my favorite current runs being put out. Of the post-apocalypse books that I’ve read the overwhelming atmosphere and mystery created by Boss and Rosenberg made this a favorite of my monthly pulls. The art, story, and humor are all highlights of a story I can’t wait to see progress.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Moose

    3.5

  11. 4 out of 5

    Paul Liadis

    I dig this. Still not completely sure what is happening or what happened to get them here, but am very interested in finding that out.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rob Hewlett

    Brilliant!

  13. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Paul

    I loved 4 Kids Walk into a Bank. I was so excited to get the trade for this one. It was so weird, I don’t know what to think.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Wild.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jordi

    Even if the storytelling gets a bit messy, still a worth read if you are into indie books - come for the weirdness and the cool punk vibes.

  16. 5 out of 5

    John Wilson

    Joss Whedon has a lot to answer for.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Linus

  18. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Still

  19. 5 out of 5

    Evan Stein

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine Estrada

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shane

  22. 4 out of 5

    Remy's Dad

  23. 5 out of 5

    Bradford Eckman

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mark Schwaber

  25. 4 out of 5

    Mark

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jeff Caplan

  27. 5 out of 5

    Ian Armstrong

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dustin Luke

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kurt

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Guy

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...