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From the creative team of GIDEON FALLS and PRIMORDIAL comes the first book in a bold and ambitious new shared horror universe! When a geologist is sent to a remote lighthouse to investigate strange phenomenon he finds a seemingly endless pit in the rocks. But what lurks within and how will he escape its pull? THE PASSAGEWAY is the first of a dozen new interconnected project From the creative team of GIDEON FALLS and PRIMORDIAL comes the first book in a bold and ambitious new shared horror universe! When a geologist is sent to a remote lighthouse to investigate strange phenomenon he finds a seemingly endless pit in the rocks. But what lurks within and how will he escape its pull? THE PASSAGEWAY is the first of a dozen new interconnected projects making up THE BONE ORCHARD MYTHOS from LEMIRE and SORRENTINO! The Bone Orchard Mythos is an ambitious expansion for the powerhouse creative team and will span multiple books and across a variety of different storytelling formats. Each title will tell its own unique, self-contained tale some as stand-alone hardcover graphic novels, some as miniseries comics, and some as longer format maxiseries comics but they will all be set within the same world and add to the overall Bone Orchard mythology. The team plans to release at least two new titles each year, for the next several years. In Summer 2022 the horrors begin with a hardcover graphic novel titled, The Passageway which follows a geologist sent to a remote lighthouse to investigate a strange phenomenon. In 2023 Lemire and Sorrentino will follow up with a miniseries collection titled, Ten Thousand Black Feathers, and then another original graphic novel hardcover in 2023 titled Tenement.


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From the creative team of GIDEON FALLS and PRIMORDIAL comes the first book in a bold and ambitious new shared horror universe! When a geologist is sent to a remote lighthouse to investigate strange phenomenon he finds a seemingly endless pit in the rocks. But what lurks within and how will he escape its pull? THE PASSAGEWAY is the first of a dozen new interconnected project From the creative team of GIDEON FALLS and PRIMORDIAL comes the first book in a bold and ambitious new shared horror universe! When a geologist is sent to a remote lighthouse to investigate strange phenomenon he finds a seemingly endless pit in the rocks. But what lurks within and how will he escape its pull? THE PASSAGEWAY is the first of a dozen new interconnected projects making up THE BONE ORCHARD MYTHOS from LEMIRE and SORRENTINO! The Bone Orchard Mythos is an ambitious expansion for the powerhouse creative team and will span multiple books and across a variety of different storytelling formats. Each title will tell its own unique, self-contained tale some as stand-alone hardcover graphic novels, some as miniseries comics, and some as longer format maxiseries comics but they will all be set within the same world and add to the overall Bone Orchard mythology. The team plans to release at least two new titles each year, for the next several years. In Summer 2022 the horrors begin with a hardcover graphic novel titled, The Passageway which follows a geologist sent to a remote lighthouse to investigate a strange phenomenon. In 2023 Lemire and Sorrentino will follow up with a miniseries collection titled, Ten Thousand Black Feathers, and then another original graphic novel hardcover in 2023 titled Tenement.

30 review for The Passageway

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    A geologist visits a distant island with a lighthouse to investigate a mysterious sinkhole that doesn’t appear to have a bottom. What lies at the end of all that darkness… ? Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino have teamed up yet again for an ambitious new project: a shared horror universe called The Bone Orchard Mythos. I saw a double-page ad at the end of Primordial, their most recent collab, which I think listed five titles that are scheduled for this series, three of which are coming out this ye A geologist visits a distant island with a lighthouse to investigate a mysterious sinkhole that doesn’t appear to have a bottom. What lies at the end of all that darkness… ? Jeff Lemire and Andrea Sorrentino have teamed up yet again for an ambitious new project: a shared horror universe called The Bone Orchard Mythos. I saw a double-page ad at the end of Primordial, their most recent collab, which I think listed five titles that are scheduled for this series, three of which are coming out this year alone! These two are nothing if not workhorses. The Passageway is the first book in the series and, as often seems to be the case with Lemire/Sorrentino comics, it’s right purty but not much else. The characters are so lightly written they may as well be ciphers. There’s the creepy lighthouse lady who clearly knows more than she’s letting on, the Canadian geologist who’s just A Guy but with disturbing dreams about his mother for some reason. We learn so little about the geologist that the nightmare flashbacks don’t really mean anything to the reader. Sorrentino’s art though is fantastic. He captures the eerie isolation of the lighthouse island beautifully and, without giving anything away, the imagery of what’s at the bottom of the well is really striking and memorable. I never tend to have anything bad to say about this artist’s work and that remains the case here. There are more questions than answers in the story, which is to be expected from a first book in a series, but the effect is still unsatisfying. It’s not the most impressive of stories - it amounts to a bunch of creepy images, some horror cliches and little else - but I’m at least intrigued enough to want to see where the Boner Orchard is headed. As it is, The Passageway is an inauspicious start to this new horror title.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    I'm starting to think that the horror that works best in comics is the psychological kind: an idea that is frightening, an idea that slowly dawns on the reader (that said, good old visceral body horror can still pack a punch as well). I think Lemire tries to do that in his horror writing, but his pacing tends to be off, and he too easily goes for clichés. Both happen here too. There's terrible pacing, barely any (much needed) build up, we're just rush-rush-rushing towards the end, we barely get a I'm starting to think that the horror that works best in comics is the psychological kind: an idea that is frightening, an idea that slowly dawns on the reader (that said, good old visceral body horror can still pack a punch as well). I think Lemire tries to do that in his horror writing, but his pacing tends to be off, and he too easily goes for clichés. Both happen here too. There's terrible pacing, barely any (much needed) build up, we're just rush-rush-rushing towards the end, we barely get an idea of the characters, nothing is allowed to breathe, nothing is allowed to settle. It results in one big shrug of a story. And so we get an ominous black hole, we get a stranger in a strange land, we get an isolated place, we get creepy old people, we get creepy old people who ask if anyone is going to miss the main character, we get kaw!-kaw!-ing crows, we get repeating nightmares, we get a Lemirean dead mother, we get guilty little boys, we get an unreliable narrator who is possibly losing his mind, we get creepy crawlies on Sorrentino inserts. It's a wonder the island doesn't sink under the mountain of clichés. Worst of all: there's nothing here that gets under your skin. Just one big shrug. (Picked up an ARC through Edelweiss)

  3. 4 out of 5

    A.J. Anders

    ”I saw my mother last night. She had the same look on her face...except for her eyes. Why were her eyes gone? What—what took them? I can’t think about that. I can’t think about what took her eyes. The Passageway is the second project set in Jeff Lemire & Andrea Sorrentino’s interconnected horror universe entitled "The Bone Orchard Mythos” from Image comics. This universe will have 1 or 2 projects a year for the foreseeable future, with over a dozen confirmed so far as of me writing this, all of w ”I saw my mother last night. She had the same look on her face...except for her eyes. Why were her eyes gone? What—what took them? I can’t think about that. I can’t think about what took her eyes. The Passageway is the second project set in Jeff Lemire & Andrea Sorrentino’s interconnected horror universe entitled "The Bone Orchard Mythos” from Image comics. This universe will have 1 or 2 projects a year for the foreseeable future, with over a dozen confirmed so far as of me writing this, all of which will be collected in OHC editions for you trade waiters. The first project, The Shadow Eaters, was a 32-page one-shot released a couple of weeks ago for Free Comic Book Day this year in the The Bone Orchard Mythos Prelude #1. The Passageway was just recently released as a 96-page OGN (Original Graphic Novel) that can be found physically in a sleek hardcover, both of which will then be followed up by Ten Thousand Black Feathers, a 5 issues miniseries starting this September, and The Tenement, another 96 page OGN releasing next spring. Joining Lemire & Sorrentino on every single one of these projects will be Dave Stewart as the colorist, Steve Wands as the designer & letterer, and editor Greg Lockard. While all these projects are interconnected, they are all standalone stories that can be read in any order on their own. The two stories we’ve gotten from this universe so far are very similar, as we follow an emotionally distressed protagonist's journey to a secluded spot before their sense of reality begins to come crashing down around them as the horrors hidden around begin to show themselves. This story uses psychological horror to build up its scares, with Sorrentino’s incredible art doing mostly all the heavy lifting to make sure that dread comes across effectively. When this universe was first announced, I thought it would be like American Horror Story in how it connected the universe and presented the horror, but after reading this and the prelude, it definitely reminds me more of The Twilight Zone than anything else. While there really isn’t some mindfucky or macabre twist that caps off all these stories, it does feature the protagonist trying to figure out what is and isn’t real in a place that doesn’t seem to follow the rules of reality. In case you couldn’t tell from the high score and glowing sentiments, I really loved this and had a great time reading this, but even though I adored it, it just isn’t anywhere close to perfect. I don’t know if I can or even would recommend this to people who aren’t big fans of this creative team like I am. The story works fine enough at the end of the day, but it’s serviceable at best if we’re being completely honest. It just goes by a bit too quickly for my tastes, meaning the pacing is kind of a total mess, but thankfully Sorrentino’s art is here to save it. Lemire’s a great writer and all, but this isn’t his best work by any means, especially in how he paces out his big story beats throughout the script. Sorrentino really did carry this book on his back. This dude is one of the best comic artists nowadays and he is at the top of his game here. He’s always shown how great he is with books like Green Arrow, Batman: Imposter, and Primordial, but this is his no doubt best work yet. He manages to constantly rack up the tension from the get go with his innovative use of layouts and paneling, and the imagery in the Passageway itself is freaky and worth the ever so slight build-up. I was thinking about it and if any other artist had drawn this book, it would’ve fucking sucked and probably be rated one or two stars. I’m thinking of Lemire’s other longtime collaborators like Dustin Nguyen or even himself drawing this book, and it just wouldn’t have been nearly as compelling. Even other horror artists like Tyler Crook & Michael Walsh wouldn’t have been able to bring the energy this book needs, it only could have been Sorrentino. I kinda get why Lemire is starting this kind of interconnected universe up with him, as no one else would have been able to help him tell this story in the way he wants to. Sorrentino is the perfect artist to draw everything in this series, it’s literally almost as if the stories and the imagery in them were made just for him, which makes sense since he had just as much of a hand in creating this mythos as Lemire did. Another complaint I want to touch on before wrapping this is the fact that Lemire claimed he wanted these books to be, and I quote, “character-driven”, which is a great goal to have and all, but you actually need to write interesting characters if you want to do that. Sal and John just aren’t all that great of characters, with John, in particular, having a pretty tropey backstory for a Lemire character, while Sal isn’t much better since she acts how most old people do in Lemire books. I honestly thought the nameless dude and his dog from the Prelude had more personality and depth than anyone in this, which is saying a lot since that was 32 pages and this is almost triple that length. I didn't hate John though, and I did like how this book ended for him, but he wasn't some gripping character or anything. I loved this a lot, but that doesn't mean I would recommend it to others either. Unless you are a massive Lemire & Sorrentino fan like me, I'd say just wait for other titles in this universe to start coming out before jumping in. While I did get the gist of all this from the Prelude and Passageway, it does give you way more questions than answers, which may be unsatisfying for some. The main highlight of this series so far is Andrea Sorrentino's art, which is, as mentioned before, the best it has ever been before. Reading it in a physical edition also helped my enjoyment of this, because lets be honest, reading physical comics will always beat digital. Lemire's script and characters need some more work in future titles, especially if he wants these books to be "character-driven", but this was a fine enough second installment to this universe. I'm debating on whether to give this 3 or 4 stars, but I think I'm gonna keep it at 4 because the art really is that impressive and the hardcover itself is pretty great and worth buying at the cover price. Excited for Ten Thousand Black Feathers in September and whatever else this universe has on the way.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Sets a Lovecraftian tone for what is to come, but isn't much fulfilling on its own. A geologist comes to a remote island lighthouse to investigate a mysterious deep hole that has appeared in the rocky soil. He repeatedly flashes back his mother's mysterious death as he deals with the mysterious lighthouse keeper. Birds mysteriously flock around the hole. Mysterious things happen, like eyeballs popping up everywhere. Or are they? But what's it all mean? It's a mystery. This reminds me too much of Je Sets a Lovecraftian tone for what is to come, but isn't much fulfilling on its own. A geologist comes to a remote island lighthouse to investigate a mysterious deep hole that has appeared in the rocky soil. He repeatedly flashes back his mother's mysterious death as he deals with the mysterious lighthouse keeper. Birds mysteriously flock around the hole. Mysterious things happen, like eyeballs popping up everywhere. Or are they? But what's it all mean? It's a mystery. This reminds me too much of Jeff VanderMeer's Southern Reach Trilogy, which starts cool and mysterious -- and features a lighthouse to boot -- but never ends up going anywhere. I'm very pessimistic about this getting better.

  5. 4 out of 5

    OmniBen

    (Zero spoiler review) I can barely bother my ass to find an original way to state just how absurdly overrated Jeff Lemire is. I can't recall how many attempts I've given this man to impress me, and yet, he never fails to find new ways to disappoint. Lemire, along with a few noted others, epitomise the talentless comic book 'big name', and I offer The Passageway: Bone Orchard as exhibit A, for the dreadful state of the comic book industry as a whole. This is it! This is the kind of shite a suppos (Zero spoiler review) I can barely bother my ass to find an original way to state just how absurdly overrated Jeff Lemire is. I can't recall how many attempts I've given this man to impress me, and yet, he never fails to find new ways to disappoint. Lemire, along with a few noted others, epitomise the talentless comic book 'big name', and I offer The Passageway: Bone Orchard as exhibit A, for the dreadful state of the comic book industry as a whole. This is it! This is the kind of shite a supposed luminary of the genre offers up. This was somehow considered good enough to publish! And not only that, but somehow he managed to rope Andrea Sorrentino into doing the artwork. The only, and I mean the only saving grace of this shameful waste of a once wonderful tree, is Sorrentino's art. Lemire's limp, weak, watered down script (that quite probably took him all of two hours to write), and that's if I'm being generous), is painful to gaze upon. This is a hazily recollected dream, quickly jotted down as a first draft, that somehow made it to print with zero additional effort or oversight. There isn't really even any writing here to speak of. It pisses me off that a writer can shit out a few paragraphs, space it over a few or more pages, then call it a script, and expect an artist to spend weeks or months labouring over it. It's pathetic and uncreative, and I can't stand it. There is zero characterisation, zero story, zero tension (beyond whatever Sorrentino evokes despite Lemire's bet efforts to ruin it). Zero everything really. And a big fat zero is what this dreck deserves, though again, it gets two for Sorrentino's efforts, even though I wish he would stick to sequential panels and let the abstract collage's and quirky designs go. If Gideon Falls wasn't a disappointing enough kick to the nuts with all that it promised yet failed to deliver, then read The Passageway. Or you could do something equally worthwhile, like insert long sharp objects into your ear canal and finger painting with the droplets of blood. Your writing is bad, Jeff. How you could look yourself in the mirror and call this a solid enough is beyond me. Avoid like the plague. 2/5 OmniBen.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    A geologist is called to a remote island to investigate the appearance of a perfect hole that has appeared overnight. Is this some natural phenomenon, or is there something more sinister at work? I wanted to rate this higher, but it's really a whole lot of nothing so far. The first half of the story builds nicely, introducing the mystery and the strange characters that surround it, but the second half is so cryptic and obtuse that I had no idea what was going on. Whether this is meant to be a hoo A geologist is called to a remote island to investigate the appearance of a perfect hole that has appeared overnight. Is this some natural phenomenon, or is there something more sinister at work? I wanted to rate this higher, but it's really a whole lot of nothing so far. The first half of the story builds nicely, introducing the mystery and the strange characters that surround it, but the second half is so cryptic and obtuse that I had no idea what was going on. Whether this is meant to be a hook for the other Bone Orchard books or it's actually just a sign that I'm dumb, I'm not sure, but it left me with a bit of a sour taste in my mouth. The artwork is of course phenomenal, because Andrea Sorrentino can't do anything else. His innovative panel arrangements are on display as always, and more than once he managed to give me a scare on a page-flip, which is hard to do in comics. Lemire always knows when to get out of the way and let Sorrentino work his magic. Maybe in retrospect this book will be better, once it's placed into the grand context of the rest of the Mythos that Lemire and Sorrentino are crafting. But as a standalone book, there's not enough resolution or even a hint as to what the actual point was for me to recommend it right now.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Stanley

    The Bone Orchard Mythos: The Passageway is an Image Comics original graphic novel written by Jeff Lemire, art by Andrea Sorrentino, and colors by Dave Stewart. A geologist is sent to a remote island and lighthouse to investigate a giant mysterious pit that has appeared. I was so excited to read this after the fantastic FCBD Prelude issue. This is a new shared universe horror series that will all be produced by the same creative team. But this book feel incredibly incomplete. The tone, atmosphere The Bone Orchard Mythos: The Passageway is an Image Comics original graphic novel written by Jeff Lemire, art by Andrea Sorrentino, and colors by Dave Stewart. A geologist is sent to a remote island and lighthouse to investigate a giant mysterious pit that has appeared. I was so excited to read this after the fantastic FCBD Prelude issue. This is a new shared universe horror series that will all be produced by the same creative team. But this book feel incredibly incomplete. The tone, atmosphere, and first third of the book are fantastic. A really cool mystery is set up and it feels incredibly dark. And then it feels like that was all Lemire could think of, gives up, and says “Hey Sorrentino, go draw whatever you want for the rest of this book.” And thankfully Sorrentino’s art keeps the book going. I can’t help but think Lemire has too much on his plate and should slow down. Mazebook was amazing but Primordial and now The Passageway have felt like great premises that were never fleshed out. I’m still looking forward to future entries of this series, but I will be a little more skeptical now.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Matty Dub

    My biggest gripe with this book is it’s overpriced for what you get, it’s such a short story, way too short for a poorly assembled book that clocks in at over 25$ CAD after conversion and taxes. The build is the same as the Marvel Now premier HCs, gutter loss and all. The story isn’t bad, there’s a great sense anxiety throughout that enhanced the psychological and cosmic horror elements found in the book but it’s also very ephemeral and too many pieces just aren’t there and the reader is expected My biggest gripe with this book is it’s overpriced for what you get, it’s such a short story, way too short for a poorly assembled book that clocks in at over 25$ CAD after conversion and taxes. The build is the same as the Marvel Now premier HCs, gutter loss and all. The story isn’t bad, there’s a great sense anxiety throughout that enhanced the psychological and cosmic horror elements found in the book but it’s also very ephemeral and too many pieces just aren’t there and the reader is expected to come up with his own interpretation of just what the hell happened. Very mid. The art is great, there’s amazing imagery found throughout.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    It's the Gideon Falls team, back with more ominous locations, moody layouts, uneasy family histories, and scary faces suddenly popping up where you weren't expecting them. I imagine that, much like Gideon Falls, the more we get explanations the less satisfying it will be. But for now, Lemire is being smart enough to step back and let Sorrentino weave a mood. And what a mood! The lonely lighthouse looms well, the mysterious hole nearby is suitably menacing, but it was once we saw what was down th It's the Gideon Falls team, back with more ominous locations, moody layouts, uneasy family histories, and scary faces suddenly popping up where you weren't expecting them. I imagine that, much like Gideon Falls, the more we get explanations the less satisfying it will be. But for now, Lemire is being smart enough to step back and let Sorrentino weave a mood. And what a mood! The lonely lighthouse looms well, the mysterious hole nearby is suitably menacing, but it was once we saw what was down there that I realised Sorrentino is the only artist I'd trust to illustrate House Of Leaves. (Edelweiss ARC)

  10. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Really great art, weird as fuck, and the dialogue is solid. But the story itself is a bit too weird, bit too "What is happening" without too many answers. Creepy though and some great visuals. A 3 out of 5. Really great art, weird as fuck, and the dialogue is solid. But the story itself is a bit too weird, bit too "What is happening" without too many answers. Creepy though and some great visuals. A 3 out of 5.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Received an early review copy of this, devoured it immediately, and it did not disappoint. A great graphic novel (if a little short) with some jaw dropping scenes and creepy imagery throughout. I’m very excited to see how Lemire and Sorrentino develop the mythos further.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bernie Gourley

    A geologist from the Geologic Survey is dispatched to a remote lighthouse island to investigate an unusual hole in the rock, and what he finds is beyond expectation. I must admit, I might have found this book more intense were it not for my own recent reading history. In the past year or so, I’ve read more than one book placing a stranger on a lighthouse island, and so it feels cliché. I can’t say for certain whether it’s truly an overused plot device or a fluke of my reading selections (though A geologist from the Geologic Survey is dispatched to a remote lighthouse island to investigate an unusual hole in the rock, and what he finds is beyond expectation. I must admit, I might have found this book more intense were it not for my own recent reading history. In the past year or so, I’ve read more than one book placing a stranger on a lighthouse island, and so it feels cliché. I can’t say for certain whether it’s truly an overused plot device or a fluke of my reading selections (though they were all new releases.) The lighthouse is a visceral setting by virtue of its isolation, with only an antisocial lighthouse keeper for company. The bigger challenge for me was the decision to let the art do much of the heavy lifting at the climax of the story. This created a great deal of ambiguity, and I couldn’t tell whether it was purposeful / strategic ambiguity or whether it was just a misunderstanding of what the reader would glean from the rapid succession of stylized panels. The artist did a good job of capturing the stark and frightful imagery necessary to achieve the requisite emotional palette for the story. However, I was distracted by so many questions: “Is this meant to be real or a dream?” “Why does the island work that way?” “What is the story’s base reality?” etc. The book’s art and premise are good (if overly familiar,) but I felt the story was given short shrift, possibly the author was more focused on the overarching story and not enough on this as a standalone entity. Long-story-short: it’s okay, and maybe as a whole the series will be more promising.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rick Brose

    Lemire and Sorrentino are a powerhouse comic team. Gideon Falls is one of my favorite comics of all time, and this has a lot of the same feel and aesthetic. The artwork is gorgeous and the page layouts are amazing. This is definitely a story that is driven by the art on the page more than the writing. As the start of a shared universe of horror, I am excited to see more. I just wish we would have had a more definitive story arc within this volume. It does not feel like a complete story. In comic Lemire and Sorrentino are a powerhouse comic team. Gideon Falls is one of my favorite comics of all time, and this has a lot of the same feel and aesthetic. The artwork is gorgeous and the page layouts are amazing. This is definitely a story that is driven by the art on the page more than the writing. As the start of a shared universe of horror, I am excited to see more. I just wish we would have had a more definitive story arc within this volume. It does not feel like a complete story. In comics that is not unusual, but I was under the impression that these were standalone stories. This does not feel like the case. Since I plan on reading everything released within this world, I do not mind so much. Others may find it disappointing.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Valéria.

    Lemire and his writing is in this the weaker piece, but still delivered what I was expecting from this. Which are simple characters, weird elements/places, and "what the fuck actually happened and how should I understand it?". Sorrentino's art is once again something I admire and always will, Stewart's colors are once again the thing that really adds up to that art quality. And though I will never feel that some comic book is really unsettling as when I was reading Infidel, this was still pretty Lemire and his writing is in this the weaker piece, but still delivered what I was expecting from this. Which are simple characters, weird elements/places, and "what the fuck actually happened and how should I understand it?". Sorrentino's art is once again something I admire and always will, Stewart's colors are once again the thing that really adds up to that art quality. And though I will never feel that some comic book is really unsettling as when I was reading Infidel, this was still pretty good. 4/5

  15. 5 out of 5

    Peacegal

    2.5 stars--There were some cool ideas and imagery here, but like a lot of modern horror, the story seemed to get bogged down in itself and left a lot of loose threads. The story doesn't explain itself very well, in other words. 2.5 stars--There were some cool ideas and imagery here, but like a lot of modern horror, the story seemed to get bogged down in itself and left a lot of loose threads. The story doesn't explain itself very well, in other words.

  16. 5 out of 5

    John Funderburg

    An eerie story - I hope the series expands the world out a bit more.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Annalisa

    This feels a little too short for me. It's beautiful artwork and the plot intrigued me. I guess since this is the start of a bigger project maybe it's only really meant to grab attention, but I'd have liked a little more depth. This feels a little too short for me. It's beautiful artwork and the plot intrigued me. I guess since this is the start of a bigger project maybe it's only really meant to grab attention, but I'd have liked a little more depth.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Etienne

    We sure get a strong feeling of Gideons Fall reading this book. Weird and fun. Also quite dark. I like the art and the story and this is a series I will continue reading! It's has been a while since I read some Jeff Lemire and it felt great! A few more new stuff to read from him so back at it! We sure get a strong feeling of Gideons Fall reading this book. Weird and fun. Also quite dark. I like the art and the story and this is a series I will continue reading! It's has been a while since I read some Jeff Lemire and it felt great! A few more new stuff to read from him so back at it!

  19. 4 out of 5

    GrilledCheeseSamurai (Scott)

    Incredible art. Not heavy on story though. Not sure where this new 'shared universe' of horror is headed, but I enjoyed Gideon Falls enough that I am willing to give these guys the benefit of the doubt and keep checking out the rest of the Bone Orchard Mythos...at least for now. Incredible art. Not heavy on story though. Not sure where this new 'shared universe' of horror is headed, but I enjoyed Gideon Falls enough that I am willing to give these guys the benefit of the doubt and keep checking out the rest of the Bone Orchard Mythos...at least for now.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    Cool concept and I loved the dark atmosphere. The hints at something bigger at play are tantalizing but this individual story didn't feel fully fleshed out, especially at the end. Cool concept and I loved the dark atmosphere. The hints at something bigger at play are tantalizing but this individual story didn't feel fully fleshed out, especially at the end.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sonic

    More unbelievable art from Sorrentino, and an excellent story by Lemire. Maybe too brief,...

  22. 4 out of 5

    Alaina

    Loved the art! Started off creepy but I thought the 2nd half of the story was weak. Hopefully the horror series they’re doing will help tie everything together otherwise is going to seem like the plot just fell off.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sucharita Biswas

    Although it is book 1 but it has a definite horror element. The only drawback was that the plot felt like a silent movie. I had only pictures to understand the whole matter. It would have been excellent if it had some dialogues. I would love to give the book 4 stars. Awaiting eagerly for the second book.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Pat

    The art is good but the story disappoints. Far too much hinting and not enough answers without any resolution. Not an auspicious start to a series.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Vinnie Uube

    I just love Sorrentino's art. His style contributes so much to the tense and eerie atmosphere that the story slowly builds. Overall, I've enjoyed all the Bone Orchard content I've read so far. I'm just not quite sure about how it concludes here and can't help but ask myself what was the point? I guess we'll find out in the next arc: Ten Thousand Black Feathers. I just love Sorrentino's art. His style contributes so much to the tense and eerie atmosphere that the story slowly builds. Overall, I've enjoyed all the Bone Orchard content I've read so far. I'm just not quite sure about how it concludes here and can't help but ask myself what was the point? I guess we'll find out in the next arc: Ten Thousand Black Feathers.

  26. 5 out of 5

    David Edmonds

    THE BONE ORCHARD MYTHOS: THE PASSAGEWAY is the start of @jefflemire and @andreasorrentinoart’s new shared horror universe being published through @imagecomics. Technically, this is the second release following a FCBD 2022 issue, titled PRELUDE: SHADOW EATER, but this is the first major release in the series. John Reed, a geologist, is called to a remote island to investigate a mysterious, seemingly endless hole that has developed there. Once there he meets Sal, the caretaker of the lighthouse on THE BONE ORCHARD MYTHOS: THE PASSAGEWAY is the start of @jefflemire and @andreasorrentinoart’s new shared horror universe being published through @imagecomics. Technically, this is the second release following a FCBD 2022 issue, titled PRELUDE: SHADOW EATER, but this is the first major release in the series. John Reed, a geologist, is called to a remote island to investigate a mysterious, seemingly endless hole that has developed there. Once there he meets Sal, the caretaker of the lighthouse on the island. It’s pretty clear early on that something is not quite right with Sal, who has lived alone on the island for twenty-five years. John’s first night on the island is haunted by nightmares of his past, and the next day takes a turn for the worst when Sal’s true nature comes to light. Much like PRELUDE: SHADOW EATER, the reader is not given much to go on with the story, having to fill in pieces of the story ourselves, which works to a degree. Everything happens so fast here, we aren’t given time to develop a connection to any of the characters, so it’s hard to feel concern for John, or really question what’s going on with Sal. I think if this OGN had been a little longer and we were given time to connect with these characters, the story would have resonated better. Sorrentino’s art carries most of the story here, and is appropriately creepy AF. You really get a sense of the remote feeling being on this island would give you, and the horror imagery is really well done. Overall, a good start to this concept. THE BONE ORCHARD MYTHOS will be continued later this year with a 5-issue miniseries called TEN THOUSAND BLACK FEATHERS, followed by another OGN, TENEMENT, in early 2023. #books #bookstagram #book #booklover #reading #bookworm #bookstagrammer #bookish #read #booknerd #bookaddict #bibliophile #booksofinstagram #instabook #readingtime #bookaholic #bookshelf #booksbooksbooks #readersofinstagram #reader #booklove #instabooks #horror #imagecomics #graphicnovel #frommybookshelfblog #frommybookshelf #jefflemire #andreasorrentino #creepyreading

  27. 4 out of 5

    Adam Stone

    This is a gorgeous art book that Jeff Lemire whispered an idea at and walked away from. He seems to think stories are Dead Parents, tell one scary detail about their death, and then muddle a couple of mysterious characters around them and see what happens. He spends no time giving characters any depth. He writes no interesting dialogue. He never bothers to build up a story. He thinks repeating that one detail somehow makes him a scary horror writer, or a suspenseful adventure writer. The art is so This is a gorgeous art book that Jeff Lemire whispered an idea at and walked away from. He seems to think stories are Dead Parents, tell one scary detail about their death, and then muddle a couple of mysterious characters around them and see what happens. He spends no time giving characters any depth. He writes no interesting dialogue. He never bothers to build up a story. He thinks repeating that one detail somehow makes him a scary horror writer, or a suspenseful adventure writer. The art is so focused, and so superior to anything Lemire has written in the last decade that I feel bad for the artist. With many comic book writers, I marvel at how they can put out four or five books (not just issues but books) a year. With Lemire, I'm not impressed because I don't think I've read anything since The Underwater Welder that seemed like it took him more than ten minutes to write. This is sort of like OverUnderThroughwater Welder but with less story and fewer pages. I can only recommend it as an art book as there's no real story to speak of. Both stars are for Andrea Sorrentino's art.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Michael Davis

    I have to say I feel a bit underwhelmed by this book. The art is great. The script is fine. Still, I feel like I’m missing something here. This is supposed to be a shared mythos with self contained stories. I missed the Free Comic Book Day Prelude comic so went back and read it online. The art is great. The script pulls you along but in the end it feels like a 32 page teaser. Of course for a Free Comic Book Day story this is fine. Main word being “free”. Unfortunately this is an $18 dollar hardc I have to say I feel a bit underwhelmed by this book. The art is great. The script is fine. Still, I feel like I’m missing something here. This is supposed to be a shared mythos with self contained stories. I missed the Free Comic Book Day Prelude comic so went back and read it online. The art is great. The script pulls you along but in the end it feels like a 32 page teaser. Of course for a Free Comic Book Day story this is fine. Main word being “free”. Unfortunately this is an $18 dollar hardcover although at almost three times the page count and when it’s over this reader was left with the same feeling that it’s another teaser with little or no resolution. Why did this need to be a hardcover at all. The feeling I was left with was like I received an appetizer at the price of a full meal. Hopefully the next “chapter?” will feel a bit more like a meal. I’m a big Jeff Lemire fan but this just seemed really thin for as big a book as it was supposed to be. Your mileage of course may vary.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Theediscerning

    A geologist is called to work out the origins of a humongous vertical shaft recently discovered on the remote bit of rock propping up a lighthouse, staffed by one hicky old woman and accessible through only one hicky old boatman. A drone sent down shows some ghastly facial visage, of a kind, but there's no success for the man – until he's forced to confront what is actually down there – and some secrets of his childhood when his mother drowned... For a launch product from a series of linked horr A geologist is called to work out the origins of a humongous vertical shaft recently discovered on the remote bit of rock propping up a lighthouse, staffed by one hicky old woman and accessible through only one hicky old boatman. A drone sent down shows some ghastly facial visage, of a kind, but there's no success for the man – until he's forced to confront what is actually down there – and some secrets of his childhood when his mother drowned... For a launch product from a series of linked horror pieces of varying lengths and kinds this didn't feel like that great an advert. I read elsewhere that this wasn't supposed to be our introduction to it, and that it was knocked off in a week. It feels like it. Yes, it's dark and creepy and mysterious, and yes our artist once more does his unusual thing with frames and gloom and showing multiple things at once, but this is a book doing nothing whatsoever that we didn't know the creators could do beforehand. Three and a half stars.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Florian

    The Passageway is an enjoyable read that unfortunately is over too soon and leaves too many questions unanswered without even making a point. I fell for the hype of this series and the universe it tries to build, I fell for Jeff Lemire and I fell for the idea of a compelling horror series. Maybe I set my expectations too high, but this volume fell short. The artwork is good, the mood right, but the story is not exceptional in any way. There are things that are left unexplained and there is no con The Passageway is an enjoyable read that unfortunately is over too soon and leaves too many questions unanswered without even making a point. I fell for the hype of this series and the universe it tries to build, I fell for Jeff Lemire and I fell for the idea of a compelling horror series. Maybe I set my expectations too high, but this volume fell short. The artwork is good, the mood right, but the story is not exceptional in any way. There are things that are left unexplained and there is no conclusion or moral or point. It's also very short, about a 30 mins read and it feels like you don't get enough bang for your buck. I don't know if I will continue with the next volume.

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