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Sociology, Economics

30 review for The Rise of the Creative Class: And How It's Transforming Work, Leisure, Community, and Everyday Life

  1. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Oh, Richard Florida. So close and yet so far. I think his heart is in the right place, but, as a member of Florida's vaunted "creative class," I must kindly tell him his theory is fucked. And here's why: --It's written from an unbelievably myopic, elite perspective. Much like Thomas Friedman, Florida seems utterly incapable of seeing the world beyond the veil of privilege that protects him and his fellow business gurus from the real world. --Everything is bolstered by spurious quantitative methods Oh, Richard Florida. So close and yet so far. I think his heart is in the right place, but, as a member of Florida's vaunted "creative class," I must kindly tell him his theory is fucked. And here's why: --It's written from an unbelievably myopic, elite perspective. Much like Thomas Friedman, Florida seems utterly incapable of seeing the world beyond the veil of privilege that protects him and his fellow business gurus from the real world. --Everything is bolstered by spurious quantitative methods without any real qualitative perspective, and even then, the quantitative research seems contradictory, unreliable, and insufficient. --Florida does acknowledge the arguments of those who believe that the current "creative economy" leads to marginalization, but doesn't give them any serious regard. Instead, he just tells a glossy anecdote. --He has a complete misunderstanding of Bohemianism. Sorry, but liking the Beatles hasn't been considered "Bohemian" for a long time, but he seems to still think that the once-subversive is still subversive. This subsumption of subversion into bourgeois culture isn't a new phenomenon. See: Stravinsky, Picasso, Byron. --When I do agree with him, it's because he just presents an obvious point in a slick way. And how appalled am I when he invokes thinkers I admire-- Daniel Bell, Jane Jacobs, Manuel Castells-- to buttress his limp arguments.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Juli

    This book changed my expectations from and about community and society. If there are enough freaks, there won't be a need to conform - and oh MY! There are certainly enough freaks to go around. Seriously, I think the creative class is coming hot on the heels of the industrialized society - I only hope I live long enough to see it really affect the deep south. This book changed my expectations from and about community and society. If there are enough freaks, there won't be a need to conform - and oh MY! There are certainly enough freaks to go around. Seriously, I think the creative class is coming hot on the heels of the industrialized society - I only hope I live long enough to see it really affect the deep south.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jimt43

    This book is an example (and there are many) of someone who had an idea good enough for an HBR article (as Florida did write as I recall) but no where near enough info and interesting ideas to produce a 400+ page epistle. I stopped long ago at page 225 and have just decided to give up on ever finishing it. Hint, read his HBR article and you will have everything you need to know.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Liz

    yeah, it was pretty bad. it was not as bad as it could've been -- it makes some critiques of precarity which I honestly wasn't expecting -- but ultimately it's a fairly nauseating celebration of the blending of bohemian aesthetics and bourgeois lifestyles. also LOL at the idea that a job in "high-end sales" is a "core creative industry". the creative class *is* the old professional class. there's no change there except in people's ideas of cool, which now arguably have a greater focus on the app yeah, it was pretty bad. it was not as bad as it could've been -- it makes some critiques of precarity which I honestly wasn't expecting -- but ultimately it's a fairly nauseating celebration of the blending of bohemian aesthetics and bourgeois lifestyles. also LOL at the idea that a job in "high-end sales" is a "core creative industry". the creative class *is* the old professional class. there's no change there except in people's ideas of cool, which now arguably have a greater focus on the appropriative consumption of difference. the central thesis of this book is so ridiculous and unsupported that it renders the whole thing useless. you should only read it if, like me, you're doing some kind of research into the influence of the concept of the "creative class" on urban and social planning and you need to check out this unfortunately rather influential primary source.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    good god. richard florida presents the case that a new "creative class" is emerging in the u.s., which is going to usher in a new era of prosperity and creativity. total lack of understanding of the human effects of globalization, almost entirely from an elite privileged perspective, almost completely worthless. good god. richard florida presents the case that a new "creative class" is emerging in the u.s., which is going to usher in a new era of prosperity and creativity. total lack of understanding of the human effects of globalization, almost entirely from an elite privileged perspective, almost completely worthless.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    Having been present in a "creative" field for the last 4 years, this book offered nothing new in terms of insight, but was nonetheless an excellent collection of ideas put forward in an enthusiastic and progressive form. There are flaws, as there often are with books written primarily for a business audience but from a (more or less) sociological perspective. A comment from another reader review is both correct and completely irrelevant: "total lack of understanding of the human effects of global Having been present in a "creative" field for the last 4 years, this book offered nothing new in terms of insight, but was nonetheless an excellent collection of ideas put forward in an enthusiastic and progressive form. There are flaws, as there often are with books written primarily for a business audience but from a (more or less) sociological perspective. A comment from another reader review is both correct and completely irrelevant: "total lack of understanding of the human effects of globalization, almost entirely from an elite privileged perspective, almost completely worthless" Florida's claim that that a growing creative workforce will alleviate perpetuating poverty through low-level service jobs is dubious. But the comment above seems to assume that Florida is a university trained sociologist/anthropologist with a responsibility to the subaltern community he is representing. Only he's not representing anyone but the elite middle class. And why not? He's an economist who is paid to consult with business groups and city councils on how to generate business using this creative class model. And in that he succeeds. Florida is most convincing when he demonstrates that the United States is in a position where to not foster the creative class is reduce its role as a competitor in the global marketplace. Creativity and innovation are the driving forces in most of today's most profitable industries. The media industry, pharmaceuticals, computer, genetic and nanotechnology are all creative inductries that absolutely require creative, project-oriented individual. Florida makes a good case for encouraging this. I don't know about his statistics, but they certainly convinve a lot of people. His premise is sound, and as someone who sees the positive effects of a workplace based on generating creativity from is workers, I think his ideas should be taken seriously by American businesses.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Diane

    As an educator, this book was the third I have read of a similar vein - starting with the World is Flat, then Pink's A Whole New Mind, and now - The Rise of the Creative Class. I read the newer version with the updated stats - that raised Denver's place in the Creative strata. The Creative Economy is a definite topic of discussion in our state, how to grab it, use it, and feed it. I think about that as a K-12 educator - how do we keep in step with the trends so that we can fulfill the expectation As an educator, this book was the third I have read of a similar vein - starting with the World is Flat, then Pink's A Whole New Mind, and now - The Rise of the Creative Class. I read the newer version with the updated stats - that raised Denver's place in the Creative strata. The Creative Economy is a definite topic of discussion in our state, how to grab it, use it, and feed it. I think about that as a K-12 educator - how do we keep in step with the trends so that we can fulfill the expectations of our communities - creating students that can be successful, strong thinkers, flexible in their approach and literate within a wide variety of genre, content, and context.

  8. 4 out of 5

    s

    i liked what one reviewer said--"if only they didn't simply corroborate the well-established idea that the "creative class" is simply a gentrification tool, rather than a sound investment and long-term backbone of a civic identity." the book is fantastic--although the data is soft if using it purely for academic purposes. however, it only goes to show that the "creative class" is a "class" and as such will work in powerful and cutthroat ways. on a side note--i read this book several years ago and i liked what one reviewer said--"if only they didn't simply corroborate the well-established idea that the "creative class" is simply a gentrification tool, rather than a sound investment and long-term backbone of a civic identity." the book is fantastic--although the data is soft if using it purely for academic purposes. however, it only goes to show that the "creative class" is a "class" and as such will work in powerful and cutthroat ways. on a side note--i read this book several years ago and it seems ironic that now we have plunged into a horrid recession--go "creative class". don't get me wrong--i'm not blaming entrepreneurs or start-ups for the biggest failed real estate/banking deals of our time. creative does not equal ponzie scheme. but, we creative class folk (i'll include myself here) are often deluded into thinking that work/love/life/passion should be all-in-one. work is work--that's why it's called work.

  9. 5 out of 5

    farmwifetwo

    I finally gave up about 120 pgs in. I then flipped through the rest, read a bit here and there. There's a few stories about people. A few quotes from other authors. There's the same "stuff" repeated over and over again. A few charts but no real format, thesis or point to be made. Not what I was anticipating or interested in reading. I finally gave up about 120 pgs in. I then flipped through the rest, read a bit here and there. There's a few stories about people. A few quotes from other authors. There's the same "stuff" repeated over and over again. A few charts but no real format, thesis or point to be made. Not what I was anticipating or interested in reading.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    This book was an unmitigated failure on a variety of levels.  For one, in reading this book the author's agenda, especially his pro-gay and anti-family agenda, and even anti-working class agenda, was particularly evident, and something he hammered over and over again.  In reading this book I felt like the uncool but decent city leaders who would tell the reader to stop talking so much about gays and bohemians, because that is exactly how I felt reading this garbage.  On top of that, which would This book was an unmitigated failure on a variety of levels.  For one, in reading this book the author's agenda, especially his pro-gay and anti-family agenda, and even anti-working class agenda, was particularly evident, and something he hammered over and over again.  In reading this book I felt like the uncool but decent city leaders who would tell the reader to stop talking so much about gays and bohemians, because that is exactly how I felt reading this garbage.  On top of that, which would have made the book bad enough, the author engages in some fun lies with statistics where he tries to tie a self-created "creative index" with tolerance of gays and bohemians, when pro-gay and pro-bohemian attitudes are already included as half of his creative index, slanting the deck as to what counts as "creative."  And that is not even getting into the problems that the author's ideas of creative professions are not very creative at all, and many of them purveyors of very uncreative b.s. that simply happens to be the sort of jobs that are being made more and more commonly these days.  This book is a train wreck, something to stare in horror at but not something that is really worth taking very seriously. This book of a bit more than 300 pages is divided into four parts and 17 chapters.  The author begins with a preface, and the first chapter posits a transformation of everyday life that has been accompanied by a group of supposedly "creative" professions including IT and media professions which have gotten a lot less creative in the past few decades (1).  After this the author looks at three aspects of a supposed creative age (I), namely, the creative ethos (2), the creative economy (3), and the creative class (4), where the author largely praises the lack of loyalty even as he notes some of the anxiety about job security that haunts many young people.  The author spends five chapters looking at work (II), comparing the machine shop and the hair salon (5), looking at the horizontal labor market (6), looking at the white collar workplace (7), discussing the management of creativity (8), and discussing a supposed time warp (9) that affects some areas.  The author spends a couple of chapters talking about life and leisure (III) in looking at the experiential life of many young people (10), as well as a rant on the big morph (11).  Then the author closes with a series of chapters on community (IV) where he discusses the power of place (12), looks at the geography of creativity (13), discusses technology, talent, and tolerance (14), discusses social and creative capital (15), looks at how creative communities are built (16), and what happens as the creative class grows up (17). Overall, this book is a disaster.  Rarely has an author's bias made him so unable to deal critically with his own cant about creativity and supposedly creative classes.  The author fails to deal with some fundamental and basic questions regarding his thesis:  are the people he writes about actually creative or not?  The same professions the author defines as being a creative class are slammed by other writers as being bulls*** jobs with some justice.  On top of that, the author seeks to defend his thesis by some illegitimate statistical analysis by which he confounds the factor he is looking for (namely the elusive creativity within communities) with some of the social factors he wishes to promote (like the presence of various artsy and immoral populations).  The fact that many of the cities he slams for their lack of openness remain economically viable cities whose job growth drives a great deal of America's economic success only indicates that the author is a blind and biased guide whose agenda gets in the way of any insights he might provide.  If you're not part of the choir that the author is preaching to, this book is definitely worth skipping altogether.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Tracy

    Carnegie Mellon University professor, Richard Florida provides an astute and extensively researched explanation of the massive cultural shifts in U.S. society over the last 30 years that have caused an entirely new social class to develop: the Creative Class. Numbering close to 40 million people, the creative class consists of workers whose intellectual energy is primarily applied to innovation, problem solving, and development of new products or services. A creative class member is distinguishe Carnegie Mellon University professor, Richard Florida provides an astute and extensively researched explanation of the massive cultural shifts in U.S. society over the last 30 years that have caused an entirely new social class to develop: the Creative Class. Numbering close to 40 million people, the creative class consists of workers whose intellectual energy is primarily applied to innovation, problem solving, and development of new products or services. A creative class member is distinguished from a working class or service class person by the fact that he or she has to figure out how to do something as opposed to just doing something that has already been figured out. The primary premise of Florida's book is that creative work brings the greatest economic benefit to society and distinct geographical regions with superior economic climates are forming around the creative workforce while leaving other areas stuck in the past and struggling to sustain their economies. Creative workers occupy many fields like engineering, architecture, medicine, law, art, entertainment, design, media, education, and the sciences. Because the demands of creative work do not necessarily fit into a traditional regimented work day with precise start and stop times, employees have been needing and often getting flexible schedules, homier work environments, and lax dress codes. The growth of the creative workforce is also changing society. The recreational needs of creative workers are much different than shift workers of previous generations. Creative workers like individual sports like bicycling far more than team sports because they want to do something on their schedules, which are often erratic. Creative workers deliver so much economic benefit to society because of the innovation that they are capable of producing. Whole new massive industries like personal computing emerged from passionate creative entrepreneurs. Creative workers can enable any business or industry to rise above its competitors by creating superior manufacturing systems, better management systems, better customer service, and of course brand new products that energize marketplaces. Florida makes the point that the creative professionals of today are vastly different than the professionals of a few decades ago when the organizational model prevailed. During the organizational age, massive companies controlled their workforces with strict command and control models that eventually stifled innovation. However, the workers, if they towed the company line, could realistically expect lifetime employment and promotions as they climbed the corporate ladder. The ethos of the organizational age dissolved during the 1990s when companies across the board decided to downsize and outsource. Gone was the expectation of lifetime employment, and many workers, especially creative workers, quickly learned that loyalty to a company was a waste of time because they could get the sack at any moment regardless of doing good work. As a result, creative workers of all types have shown a great tendency, as documented by Florida's research, to congregate in regions that offer many job opportunities related to their chosen fields so they can find new jobs as necessary. Creative workers are also very finicky about where they live because they want to live in culturally stimulating environments with robust music scenes, theater, street festivals, and so forth. They also crave nice outdoor recreation areas like bike paths and green spaces as opposed to organized entertainments like theme parks. In fact, tasteless things like box stores and chain restaurants, which Florida labels generica, are anathema to creative workers. Creative workers in general also crave tolerant societies in which to live. They need environments that easily welcome their quirky and often downright nerdy selves. This is why they tend to be attracted to enclaves of Bohemian style people like artists, writers, and musicians. Such tolerant areas, like the obvious example of San Francisco, almost always have strong gay communities too. Florida found a significant correlation between flourishing gay regions and the presence of creative economies. This was not because all gay people are creative, but gay people face a lot of discrimination and hatred and therefore congregate in tolerant regions. Therefore social tolerance was a leading indicator of a strong economic climate when compared to socially intolerant regions. In addition to tolerance, creative economies also need access to technology, which is usually promoted by the presence of research universities. Talent was the final requirement for creating a strong creative economic region. Studies strongly showed that talented creative workers were likely to move to regions that had both tolerance and technologically innovative universities and companies. If one element was missing, then a break away creative economy could not come fully into bloom. As a result, whole industries are starting to relocate to the robust centers of creative workforces so they can have talent pools from which to draw. Major examples of such regions cited by Florida were Austin, Boston, San Francisco, and Seattle. The author also seeks with this book to make creative workers conscious of their emerging and distinctive class. They have in general been very self absorbed, but Florida entreats them to play a more active role in the shaping of the country because the old school forces of the organizational age persist and tend to pursue ill-conceived and outdated projects that do not help the economy and sometimes even make it worse. The author basically harps on the wasted billions of dollars that governments and economic development corporations slather onto sports stadiums and shopping malls, which are proven to do nothing to enliven local economies. A successful economic future for the country is dependent on creative workers hauling the rest of the country into the twenty first century. Florida wants creative class members to push society toward a more creative model so that the vast untapped creative resources of people in other classes can be nourished instead of wasted. This would make people happier and improve the economy. This book is tremendously well written. The author has an engaging style that is supported by abundant facts, statistics, and anecdotes. All creative workers should find that it rings very true with their personal experiences, beliefs, and tastes. I know it did for me. After reading this book, I consider myself enlightened to a reality that I felt but was not aware of intellectually or consciously. For anyone interested in understanding systemic problems with the U.S. economy and social trends, The Rise of the Creative Class is highly recommended and truly fascinating.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Miguel Gonzalez

    Out of date thinking about Millennials that may be revived with a solid update (2018).

  13. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie H

    The basic thesis of the book is that diverse, tolerant, creative urban centers attract people of the same disposition. It is those people who are the driving force of the economy and their desired lifestyle dictates their choice of city and ultimately their choice of occupation. Their lives are no longer dictated by their jobs like in the days of the Organization Man in the Grey Flannel Suit. At the beginning of the book, I found myself agreeing with Florida's every word. Yet as the book progres The basic thesis of the book is that diverse, tolerant, creative urban centers attract people of the same disposition. It is those people who are the driving force of the economy and their desired lifestyle dictates their choice of city and ultimately their choice of occupation. Their lives are no longer dictated by their jobs like in the days of the Organization Man in the Grey Flannel Suit. At the beginning of the book, I found myself agreeing with Florida's every word. Yet as the book progressed, he presented the same tired argument over and over. Not only that, but he presented the same graphs over and over. Or, they weren't the same graphs, but they looked exactly the same aside from the labeling of the x and y indexes. Now I have a thorough understanding that members of the creative class have been increasing over the last 40 years. I also understand there is a correlation though not causation between tech companies, homosexuality, bohemians, and immigration in major cities. For an academic book, the facts were arguably quite soft. I will usually overlook soft science for a book that is accessible to the public at large. However, I would not even call this book accessible because even though it says "National Bestseller" on the title, I doubt this book received high readership outside of those core creative cities he already praises so highly. I doubt the book had high readership in Stockton CA, Amarillo TX, Yuma AZ or Myrtle Beach SC. (Note: these cities were taken from Appendix B table 1 listing cities and their ranks on the creativity index compared to tech sector, tolerance level and wage gap. These cities were listed among the lowest, and therefore, most lame). I find it quite likely that this book was well received in Austin TX, San Francisco CA, Seattle WA and New York NY (some cities he lists as creative centers for their music, ethnic diversity, youth oriented culture, public outdoor spaces, acceptance of alternative lifestyles, etc. i.e. cities that are awesome). Perhaps I only agreed with this book's thesis because I work in an industry on the cusp of service and creative class (I'm a chef, you tell me) and live in the city he lists as a harbinger of the new age and economic system. No matter what, I could only read this book with a biased eye. "Fuck yeah the Mission District is awesome!" I thought. "Fuck yeah OpenSource software!" I thought later. There was no way to turn a blind eye to the bias presented in the book. The author is from Pittsburg (which ranks 90 on the index and is ultimately more lame than San Francisco or Austin). Though he offers necessary advice that cities need to reform as creative centers first in order to attract talent, youth and economic vitality, he does so in a way that expresses what can practically be described as contempt for the unwillingness to deviate from traditional middle class values and suburban lifestyles. "Your sports teams and symphonies and opera won't bring in needed revenue for the city because that's not what people actually care about anymore" he states. "You need to invest in public parks, research based universities and all the best local culture." I was accepting of this idea, but I'm pretty sure that's because I live in an area where it is cool to be alternative. But this book shouldn't be written for me or anyone who tries to foster the ideas of this book in their own lives. This book needs to find an audience in areas where the ideas are unpopular and counter-intuitive. I fear it will never find an audience in those areas where it is needed most. Even though this was a necessary argument, it did not need to be made in a book. It could have been more effective magazine article for brevity is indeed the soul of wit.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    pretty horrifying. at its best it presents interesting statistics about the work and lifestyle habits of a radically changing work force. but rarely does it ever analyze the consequences or meaning of these figures. it describes the factors of gentrification without really recognizing the fruits of the “creative class” as anything but a productive foece EDIT: I was immediately inspired to quit my creative class job after reading this book. this book has “changed my life.” I’m working a better job pretty horrifying. at its best it presents interesting statistics about the work and lifestyle habits of a radically changing work force. but rarely does it ever analyze the consequences or meaning of these figures. it describes the factors of gentrification without really recognizing the fruits of the “creative class” as anything but a productive foece EDIT: I was immediately inspired to quit my creative class job after reading this book. this book has “changed my life.” I’m working a better job now I guess LOL

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ahmed Abdelhamid

    I might not have enjoyed some of the analysis of “shifts” in the book, but, indeed it changed my personal view and made me conscious of many economic changes, life style shifts, cities growth or decay, clustering the contemporary community and talent management issues. Given all these numeric facts in the book, about the technology, talent and tolerance in various cities it was very pleasant and a true added value (to me). 2008 كتب تعليقا مطولا بالعربية هنا: http://www.ahmedabdelhamid.com/arblog... I might not have enjoyed some of the analysis of “shifts” in the book, but, indeed it changed my personal view and made me conscious of many economic changes, life style shifts, cities growth or decay, clustering the contemporary community and talent management issues. Given all these numeric facts in the book, about the technology, talent and tolerance in various cities it was very pleasant and a true added value (to me). 2008 كتب تعليقا مطولا بالعربية هنا: http://www.ahmedabdelhamid.com/arblog... 2011

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    An interesting argument pursued around the idea of creativity being just as important as technology and tolerance as a key driver of regional growth. Fatalistic about globalisation leading to manufacturing production jobs going offshore and emphasis is on creating a creative class to attract advanced manufacturing. Potentially overlooks therefore the paradox of periphery regions in former Eastern bloc regions with authoritarian traditions.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    Didn't actually read the whole thing, but was impressed and intrigued by a chapter on my hometown Pittsburgh and its inability to rise above its industrial culture and attitudes. I see that, always have, and could never put my finger on why Pittsburgh just never felt like the kind of place I wanted to live as a free adult. Of course I still love and long for it... Didn't actually read the whole thing, but was impressed and intrigued by a chapter on my hometown Pittsburgh and its inability to rise above its industrial culture and attitudes. I see that, always have, and could never put my finger on why Pittsburgh just never felt like the kind of place I wanted to live as a free adult. Of course I still love and long for it...

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alina Peussa

    I agree with most of his ideas.

  19. 5 out of 5

    CTEP

    I want to start my February book club review by saying: read this book! I think the pseudo-nerdy-hipsters of the Twin Cities aka CTEPers would really appreciate this book. Phew, I feel the weight of the burden of recommending a truly great read lifted off my shoulders now… In The Rise of the Creative Class: And How It's Transforming Work, Leisure, Community and Everyday Life, Richard Florida argues that socioeconomic prosperity is directly related to a city’s “creative class” or density/presence I want to start my February book club review by saying: read this book! I think the pseudo-nerdy-hipsters of the Twin Cities aka CTEPers would really appreciate this book. Phew, I feel the weight of the burden of recommending a truly great read lifted off my shoulders now… In The Rise of the Creative Class: And How It's Transforming Work, Leisure, Community and Everyday Life, Richard Florida argues that socioeconomic prosperity is directly related to a city’s “creative class” or density/presence of communities that have creative values. This is a fancy way of saying that cities with more artists, musicians, berets, non-profits, art galleries, coffee shops, and mustaches are inheritently richer. He also argues that certain neighborhoods within cities feature varying levels of creative culture density and consequently varying levels of wealth. Florida uses philosophy, social and economic theory, and rationality to deliver his arguments. For example, when determining the top cities according to their creative ranking (Minneapolis is #10 in the US, go team!), the author uses mathematical formulas. The ‘creativity index’ is determined by combining a city’s High Tech Index, Gay Index, # of creative workers, innovation rank, and diversity rank as “a reasonable proxy for an area's openness to different kinds of people and ideas.” Geeker review: fascinating! I would recommend this book to fellow CTEPers because we are very lucky to live in a creative culture in Minneapolis and St. Paul. This book really made me appreciate the Cities for valuing creativity, education, and public assistance. This culture promotes helping others and reinforces the AmeriCorps mission. PS – Richard Florida has been criticized for being a granola, liberal, hipster, idealist. But isn’t that a positive thing? PSS – The Executive Director of our company recommended this book: life is good.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jo-Ann

    I found a great deal in this volume to be fascinated by - especially how the author details the rising separation between the economically dominant Creative Class and the Working and Service Classes. It explains more clearly to me what factors in the United States have given the election of Donald Trump. He also outlines the elements that explain the backlash and anger of those who feel forgotten. While Prof. Florida in many cases remains optimistic, I came away from this read feeling a sense of I found a great deal in this volume to be fascinated by - especially how the author details the rising separation between the economically dominant Creative Class and the Working and Service Classes. It explains more clearly to me what factors in the United States have given the election of Donald Trump. He also outlines the elements that explain the backlash and anger of those who feel forgotten. While Prof. Florida in many cases remains optimistic, I came away from this read feeling a sense of sadness and trepidation in regard to how our society has changed in the High Tech age. The inclusion elements are great, but the rise of individualism and sense of isolation sadden me. Prof. Florida does refer to the fact that not everyone can be a creative class worker; it seems to me that even if one starts out being a member of that class, it may not suit them throughout their life span. I think of my own work life and how my needs have changed over time. My question is how the world will continue to respond in the economic distance between those who have and those who have not.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Dr

    For those of us caught unawares, let it be known that the Working Class is dead. As a socio-political force, anyway. As is the Bourgeoisie. The Creative Class is what has risen to take its place and Richard Florida's 'Rise of the Creative Class' documents how it did so, how its impacted cities and towns across the nation, and how your city should adjust if it hopes to have a chance of catching on. The Creative Class is represented by cities like New York and Chicago, of course, but also Seattle For those of us caught unawares, let it be known that the Working Class is dead. As a socio-political force, anyway. As is the Bourgeoisie. The Creative Class is what has risen to take its place and Richard Florida's 'Rise of the Creative Class' documents how it did so, how its impacted cities and towns across the nation, and how your city should adjust if it hopes to have a chance of catching on. The Creative Class is represented by cities like New York and Chicago, of course, but also Seattle and Austin and Minneapolis. Places, Florida tells us, that combine the magical Creative Class elixir of technology, talent and tolerance. I don't think I've ever seen myself stereotyped so well. Seriously. 'Rise' elegantly summed up everything me and my peers are looking for in life. Tie a bow on it and give it to your managers, your CEO, your local representatives, your parents who still struggle to "get" you. Its a little dry - its a book about economics afterall - but pleasantly engaging.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rich Maloy

    I picked up this book because Brad Feld referenced it once or twice in Startup Communities. Five and a half years later, I'm trying to write a review for it. I vaguely recall nodding my head quite a bit in agreement research and feeling hope from the conclusions. However, I didn't go back and re-read it. As much as I want to read a book that's backed by research, sometimes the research is too much of the narrative and I want suggested action. In 2013 I was just getting started as an ecosystem le I picked up this book because Brad Feld referenced it once or twice in Startup Communities. Five and a half years later, I'm trying to write a review for it. I vaguely recall nodding my head quite a bit in agreement research and feeling hope from the conclusions. However, I didn't go back and re-read it. As much as I want to read a book that's backed by research, sometimes the research is too much of the narrative and I want suggested action. In 2013 I was just getting started as an ecosystem leader/builder. With a few years of experience in that realm under my belt now, I may go back and give this a re-read. Until then, three stars just because I want the gameplan book (Startup Communities) not the research book (this one).

  23. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    I was able to get most of the gist of this book from an hour long Presentation from Richard Florida on YouTube. There is also a 2012 revised edition if you are looking for current statistics. Dr. Florida is a professor, so this book is very academic focused but still very interesting to read. I read it hoping to learn more about job trends and what the current and especially the future of work will likely look like. In that respect it was only partially effective. Florida provides a list of citi I was able to get most of the gist of this book from an hour long Presentation from Richard Florida on YouTube. There is also a 2012 revised edition if you are looking for current statistics. Dr. Florida is a professor, so this book is very academic focused but still very interesting to read. I read it hoping to learn more about job trends and what the current and especially the future of work will likely look like. In that respect it was only partially effective. Florida provides a list of cities which are likely to be large hubs for creative people and jobs, but many of them are no surprise to most creative types.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tim Maurer

    How, you may ask, can I rate a book that I was unable to finish as four stars? Well, the message was clear--it just wasn't concise (but that's not necessarily the book's fault). What I didn't realize before I started into this book is that it's really more like a textbook, laden with loads (and loads and loads) of research. A few chapters in, I was convinced that there is, indeed, a "creative class," that it's far more expansive than people think (entrepreneurs and business leaders, for example, How, you may ask, can I rate a book that I was unable to finish as four stars? Well, the message was clear--it just wasn't concise (but that's not necessarily the book's fault). What I didn't realize before I started into this book is that it's really more like a textbook, laden with loads (and loads and loads) of research. A few chapters in, I was convinced that there is, indeed, a "creative class," that it's far more expansive than people think (entrepreneurs and business leaders, for example, can and often are "creatives"), that I want to be inspired by these people and that, to the best of my abilities, I want to be one.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Anne Thomas

    This book offered valuable information to me as an emerging artist. The explanation on how the US economy has shifted since the financial crisis of 2008 helped me to understand and navigate the job market. Richard Florida clearly did extensive research, and refutes counter-arguments made against him in a strong and intelligent way. One critique was that the book was very lengthy and over-written so I ended up skimming over some chapters.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Lisa Roney

    I wish this book were true. Alas, especially in the years since it was published, it has become clear that the book was comprised mostly of wishful thinking. I think that the biggest mistake that Richard Florida makes is that he claims this is the way something IS when it would be more honestly posed as an argument for why things SHOULD be this way or COULD be this way if only our society valued the arts and creativity. Unfortunately, most of our society doesn't. I wish this book were true. Alas, especially in the years since it was published, it has become clear that the book was comprised mostly of wishful thinking. I think that the biggest mistake that Richard Florida makes is that he claims this is the way something IS when it would be more honestly posed as an argument for why things SHOULD be this way or COULD be this way if only our society valued the arts and creativity. Unfortunately, most of our society doesn't.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Karen Briscoe

    This is sure to be a classic! As someone whose career and life was focused on left brain activity, flexing the right brain muscles do not come naturally to me. Now in the second half of life, I am finding value in putting energy, time and resources into creative pursuits. Society I believe benefits from both. Karen Briscoe, author "Success in 5 Minutes a Day". This is sure to be a classic! As someone whose career and life was focused on left brain activity, flexing the right brain muscles do not come naturally to me. Now in the second half of life, I am finding value in putting energy, time and resources into creative pursuits. Society I believe benefits from both. Karen Briscoe, author "Success in 5 Minutes a Day".

  28. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Perini

    I really enjoy Florida's ideas, and the practical philosophy he outlines in this book. But the writing is highly academic, and often forgets the reader, making a somewhat heady concept even harder to grasp. I really enjoy Florida's ideas, and the practical philosophy he outlines in this book. But the writing is highly academic, and often forgets the reader, making a somewhat heady concept even harder to grasp.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Casey Willits

    At this point so much of it is dated. Some has been rejected by academics and the chattering class. Some has been blindly adopted as gospel truth. Even more has been ignored as having provided much of the structural changes that underlay the 2016 presidential election.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Yates Buckley

    The hypothesis of a rising creative class needs to be integrated in other changes such as automation and increased inequality. The idea is interesting and might even have been true for a moment but unsustainable in current environment.

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