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Race, Class, & Gender: An Anthology

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RACE, CLASS, AND, GENDER, includes many interdisciplinary readings. The author's selection of very accessible articles show how race, class, and gender shape people's experiences, and help students to see the issues in an analytic, as well as descriptive way. The book also provides conceptual grounding in understanding race, class, and gender; has a strong historical and s RACE, CLASS, AND, GENDER, includes many interdisciplinary readings. The author's selection of very accessible articles show how race, class, and gender shape people's experiences, and help students to see the issues in an analytic, as well as descriptive way. The book also provides conceptual grounding in understanding race, class, and gender; has a strong historical and sociological perspective; and is further strengthened by conceptual introductions by the authors. Students will find the readings engaging and accessible, but may gain the most from the introduction sections that highlight key points and relate the essential concepts. Included in the collection of readings are narratives aimed at building empathy, and articles on important social issues such as prison, affirmative action, poverty, immigration, and racism, among other topics. Includes Why race, class, and gender still matter by M.L. Andersen and P.H. Collins Missing people and others, joining together to expand the circle by A. Madrid Systems of power and inequality by M.L. Andersen and P.H. Collins Race and racism, Racism without "racists" by E. Bonilla-Silva Class and inequality, Growing gulf between rich and the rest of us by H. Sklar Gender and sexism, Sex and gender through the prism of difference by M.B. Zinn, P. Hondahneu-Sotelo, and M. Messner Ethnicity and nationality, Is this a white country, or what? by L. Rubin Sexuality and heterosexism, "You talkin' to me?" by J. Kilbourne Structure of social institutions by M.L. Andersen and P.H. Collins Work and economic transformation, Race, class, gender, and women's works by T. Amott and J. Matthaei Families, Our mothers' grief, racial-ethnic women and the maintenance of families by B.T. Dill Media and culture, Racist stereotyping in the English language by R.B. Moore Health and social welfare, Can education eliminate race, class, and gender inequality? by R.A. Mickelson and S.S. Smith State institutions and violence, First Americans, American Indians by C.M. Snipp Social change and sites of change by M.L. Andersen and P.H. Collins Sites of change, Starbucks paradox by K. Fellner Processes of change, How the new working class transform urban America by R.D.G. Kelley


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RACE, CLASS, AND, GENDER, includes many interdisciplinary readings. The author's selection of very accessible articles show how race, class, and gender shape people's experiences, and help students to see the issues in an analytic, as well as descriptive way. The book also provides conceptual grounding in understanding race, class, and gender; has a strong historical and s RACE, CLASS, AND, GENDER, includes many interdisciplinary readings. The author's selection of very accessible articles show how race, class, and gender shape people's experiences, and help students to see the issues in an analytic, as well as descriptive way. The book also provides conceptual grounding in understanding race, class, and gender; has a strong historical and sociological perspective; and is further strengthened by conceptual introductions by the authors. Students will find the readings engaging and accessible, but may gain the most from the introduction sections that highlight key points and relate the essential concepts. Included in the collection of readings are narratives aimed at building empathy, and articles on important social issues such as prison, affirmative action, poverty, immigration, and racism, among other topics. Includes Why race, class, and gender still matter by M.L. Andersen and P.H. Collins Missing people and others, joining together to expand the circle by A. Madrid Systems of power and inequality by M.L. Andersen and P.H. Collins Race and racism, Racism without "racists" by E. Bonilla-Silva Class and inequality, Growing gulf between rich and the rest of us by H. Sklar Gender and sexism, Sex and gender through the prism of difference by M.B. Zinn, P. Hondahneu-Sotelo, and M. Messner Ethnicity and nationality, Is this a white country, or what? by L. Rubin Sexuality and heterosexism, "You talkin' to me?" by J. Kilbourne Structure of social institutions by M.L. Andersen and P.H. Collins Work and economic transformation, Race, class, gender, and women's works by T. Amott and J. Matthaei Families, Our mothers' grief, racial-ethnic women and the maintenance of families by B.T. Dill Media and culture, Racist stereotyping in the English language by R.B. Moore Health and social welfare, Can education eliminate race, class, and gender inequality? by R.A. Mickelson and S.S. Smith State institutions and violence, First Americans, American Indians by C.M. Snipp Social change and sites of change by M.L. Andersen and P.H. Collins Sites of change, Starbucks paradox by K. Fellner Processes of change, How the new working class transform urban America by R.D.G. Kelley

30 review for Race, Class, & Gender: An Anthology

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nancy

    So far, an excellent collection of essays that shows clearly what is wrong with the world and how deeply and insidiously the lives of so many people are affected by power imbalances in our society. It looks like I won't be finishing this book. Some fucker stole it off my desk at work last night. So far, an excellent collection of essays that shows clearly what is wrong with the world and how deeply and insidiously the lives of so many people are affected by power imbalances in our society. It looks like I won't be finishing this book. Some fucker stole it off my desk at work last night.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Damien

    I read this book in the Winter of 2003; while I had been against racism, classism, and (hetero)sexism for my whole adult life, I didn't realize how serious all these issues really were until I read this anthology. Sure, I always knew they were serious issues, but like most Americans, I almost felt like MY particular life was some how unaffected by them, or that freedom from institutionalized oppression was "just around the corner". Since I was a young child, I knew that things were wrong on many I read this book in the Winter of 2003; while I had been against racism, classism, and (hetero)sexism for my whole adult life, I didn't realize how serious all these issues really were until I read this anthology. Sure, I always knew they were serious issues, but like most Americans, I almost felt like MY particular life was some how unaffected by them, or that freedom from institutionalized oppression was "just around the corner". Since I was a young child, I knew that things were wrong on many levels, but when I asked about these things, I was often discouraged by family members, teachers, and peers. Many of the contributions to this book answer many of those questions- yeah, it all started coming back to me- and more importantly, for the first time I was starting to understand why people went to such lengths to hide the truth. I wonder if I read it again, I'll like it as much as I did when I first read it- cover to cover, in fact- but at the time it was a real eye opener.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Joel

    An excellent collection of essays that introduced me to concepts like the feminization of labor, exposed me to unique perspectives regarding class solidarity, and taught me about Latinx and indigenous cultures in the US. That being said, these articles were definitely dated as many of them heralded back to the 80s and the most recent being published in the 90s. It also seemed like so many of the essays were alluding to Crenshaw's intersectionality but had never heard the term. They repeatedly me An excellent collection of essays that introduced me to concepts like the feminization of labor, exposed me to unique perspectives regarding class solidarity, and taught me about Latinx and indigenous cultures in the US. That being said, these articles were definitely dated as many of them heralded back to the 80s and the most recent being published in the 90s. It also seemed like so many of the essays were alluding to Crenshaw's intersectionality but had never heard the term. They repeatedly mentioned the need to recognize the multiple identities of an individual but often as more of an afterthought in the concluding paragraph rather than a focus of the essay. I'm sure I'll reference this in future work!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Teri Pardue

    This is an impressive collection of essays on issues surrounding diversity in American society (areas of diversity covered include race, class, gender sexuality, and ethnicity). The essays are so varied and of differing quality so it’s hard to comment on content as a whole -other than to say it’s a mixed bag. However, it’s hard to imagine a more complete collection. Many of the essays sparked thoughtful conversations and challenged my own thinking. There were a dozen or so that were so poorly wr This is an impressive collection of essays on issues surrounding diversity in American society (areas of diversity covered include race, class, gender sexuality, and ethnicity). The essays are so varied and of differing quality so it’s hard to comment on content as a whole -other than to say it’s a mixed bag. However, it’s hard to imagine a more complete collection. Many of the essays sparked thoughtful conversations and challenged my own thinking. There were a dozen or so that were so poorly written and meandering that I questioned their inclusion. The book could have benefited from more thoughtful culling on the part of the editors to make it higher quality.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Terri Lynn

    I enjoyed this very much. After growing up in the 1960's and 1970's in Atlanta, Georgia, I got to see the civil rights movement and the women's liberation movement up close and was involved because my parents were liberals who fought for blacks and other minorities to have equal rights, were feminists, and who also fought even then for gay rights. I am fortunate to have been raised by people who set me on the same path of caring about social justice. How far have we come in seeing social justice I enjoyed this very much. After growing up in the 1960's and 1970's in Atlanta, Georgia, I got to see the civil rights movement and the women's liberation movement up close and was involved because my parents were liberals who fought for blacks and other minorities to have equal rights, were feminists, and who also fought even then for gay rights. I am fortunate to have been raised by people who set me on the same path of caring about social justice. How far have we come in seeing social justice? Not as far as I would like. Look at the current presidential race and the 2012 elections where Republicans have sought to disenfranchise those who they fear would vote for Democrats. Look at the birthers who despite seeing both of Barack Obama's birth certificates (long and short form) published, hearing Hawaiian officials discuss the fact that his birth was registered at the time of birth and the fact that the hospital where he was born sent them the registration info and have their own records, etc still insist he is a Kenyan Muslim because he is half black. The issue of race, gender, and class are very much alive. In gender, the war on women's reproductive rights is as fierce now as it was in the 1960's and 1970's with Republicans and religious conservatives battling to control each woman's vagina and uterus. As for class, the 1% seeks to get richer off the backs of the 99% and continue to send American jobs abroad so to exploit men, women, and children in other countries. They also seek to destroy the social safety net so to offer the wealthy tax breaks. With ethnicity, we have Asians who are high achievers and Hispanics who break and enter into country illegally and all of the issues involved with this. So, race, gender, and class all are topics that are very much alive and well and important right now. My only complaint about the book is that some of the essays about blacks make the presumption that they are perpetual victims when in fact, they have the same opportunities to go to college and have a good life as anyone. I have lived through the years of the changes and hate to see writers like Shapiro in his essay in this book come up with nonsense like his assertion that blacks can't catch up with whites financially because whites get inheritances and blacks don't. This is absurd. Most of us do not get where we are because of any inheritance. 99% of us are not Mitt Romney. This is a class issue, not a racial one. This is an excellent anthology of very readable essays on these topics that are well worth interacting with.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kimberly

    Got this book used for $72.00 for Soc class this Fall. Realize that I read it when my daughter took the class some years ago! Still good. This book is a difficult read, at times, due to the complex subject matter and the small font! Most of the essays I really enjoy but the class quizzes on essays not so much! Really difficult quizzes so far! So much for acing the class but I love it and am learning a lot!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Kris

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I'm reading excerpts from this for my culture class, and it is really good. It is a collection of essays, but with the concept that race, gender, and class are not simply seperate categories, but form a complex matrix that affects every individual and our society as a whole. The book consistently reminds us that race, gender, and class are social constructs, and their meanings are evolving. I'm reading excerpts from this for my culture class, and it is really good. It is a collection of essays, but with the concept that race, gender, and class are not simply seperate categories, but form a complex matrix that affects every individual and our society as a whole. The book consistently reminds us that race, gender, and class are social constructs, and their meanings are evolving.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    My favorite textbook ever...

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey

    A book of essays from many different sources. Completely eye-opening about a range of topics, specifically linking what makes humans unique through the lens of intersectionality in each case. Won't read like a novel but will absolutely keep you interested if you're ready to dive deep on diversity and the intersectionality of the things which define us. A book of essays from many different sources. Completely eye-opening about a range of topics, specifically linking what makes humans unique through the lens of intersectionality in each case. Won't read like a novel but will absolutely keep you interested if you're ready to dive deep on diversity and the intersectionality of the things which define us.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Tiffany Marcum

    Phenomenal collection on thought provoking essays. Read as part of a Racial and Cultural Minorities Study in college, 2004. Still glance at it to this day. Cannot rate it highly enough. A must read.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Hana Cohen

    CULTURAL DIVERSITY class

  12. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    Great narrative introduction to social critical theory.

  13. 4 out of 5

    J

    Definitely a good introduction to intersectionality and race/class/gender analysis but that also means that the work included can feel very surface-level at times. If you're totally new to this kind of work, this will likely be a revelation. If you've been immersed in it already, use this as a jumping off point to find the authors and ideas you're most interested in. Definitely a good introduction to intersectionality and race/class/gender analysis but that also means that the work included can feel very surface-level at times. If you're totally new to this kind of work, this will likely be a revelation. If you've been immersed in it already, use this as a jumping off point to find the authors and ideas you're most interested in.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    An outstanding collection of short stories and essays on life as people are forced to lead them. Some humorous, so heart-wrenching, but all worth reading. Yes, it was purchased as a class book, yes, it is going on my book shelf as it is worth re-reading.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    Using for Intro to Sociology. Would be good for any multiculturalism class. But good use of actually reading articles rather than just generally lecturing on the subjects. Short, very user friendly articles that are accessible to intro students.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Hena

    i read some bits, t'was interesting innit i read some bits, t'was interesting innit

  17. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Really interesting collection of stories and essays on the topic. Highly recommended.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Lauramaria

    I had to read this and similar anthologies for a class and really enjoyed it.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Nancy Babbitt

    A great book that explores the intersecting relationships of power and privilege within socially constructed systems of race, class and gender.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jana

    Probably one of my favorite textbooks to date.

  21. 5 out of 5

    T. Smith

    anthology; in several editions now

  22. 5 out of 5

    Shiloh Maples

  23. 5 out of 5

    Phillip Casteel

  24. 4 out of 5

    Sara

  25. 4 out of 5

    Katie Morris

  26. 4 out of 5

    Milira

  27. 4 out of 5

    Susan Bloom

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jamila

  29. 5 out of 5

    Shay-Akil McLean

  30. 5 out of 5

    Keisha

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