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Spider-Man: Reign

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The 'capes and tights' crowd - there's no place for them in the Big Gapple anymore. Peter Parker? He can't even remember what it was like to don the red and blue and swing through the night sky. Doesn't want to, anyway. After all, there's nothing left to fight for, is there? That is until an old 'friend' appear on Peter's doorstep. The 'capes and tights' crowd - there's no place for them in the Big Gapple anymore. Peter Parker? He can't even remember what it was like to don the red and blue and swing through the night sky. Doesn't want to, anyway. After all, there's nothing left to fight for, is there? That is until an old 'friend' appear on Peter's doorstep.


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The 'capes and tights' crowd - there's no place for them in the Big Gapple anymore. Peter Parker? He can't even remember what it was like to don the red and blue and swing through the night sky. Doesn't want to, anyway. After all, there's nothing left to fight for, is there? That is until an old 'friend' appear on Peter's doorstep. The 'capes and tights' crowd - there's no place for them in the Big Gapple anymore. Peter Parker? He can't even remember what it was like to don the red and blue and swing through the night sky. Doesn't want to, anyway. After all, there's nothing left to fight for, is there? That is until an old 'friend' appear on Peter's doorstep.

30 review for Spider-Man: Reign

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    Starts out interesting - Spidey as a codger, shuffling around, getting pushed around, and staying off the radar. Hallucinating about his dead wife, trying to make her happy. Then it just gets silly, hard to believe. The old man with a broken arm jumps some armoured cops and beats them senseless? Then later his arm is healed for no reason? And we get kids, raised from birth in a police state, all of a sudden talking like Ayn Rand and rising up for the first time against the oppressors? Nice fantas Starts out interesting - Spidey as a codger, shuffling around, getting pushed around, and staying off the radar. Hallucinating about his dead wife, trying to make her happy. Then it just gets silly, hard to believe. The old man with a broken arm jumps some armoured cops and beats them senseless? Then later his arm is healed for no reason? And we get kids, raised from birth in a police state, all of a sudden talking like Ayn Rand and rising up for the first time against the oppressors? Nice fantasy kids, doesn't even come close to a believable emotional moment. The art is pretty interesting, and even though it portrays some impossible moves by various folks, it's at least captivatingly weird. Not easy to follow the action, but vivid in exaggeration nonetheless. I wanted so bad for this story to have deep emotional resonance - or even just the level of focused anger we saw in the Dark Knight Returns. Instead we find a half-baked love note to MJ and JJJ, and a sad tribute to what strength Parker always had.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Nate

    If you ever thought, "I wish I could read a Spider-Man story stripped of any of the characters whimsy and joy and set in an ultra grim, authoritarian future where Mary Jane has died from long term exposure to Peter Parker's radioactive sperm. Oh, and it would be really great if every page was actively unpleasant to look at," then brother do I have the graphic novel for you! If you ever thought, "I wish I could read a Spider-Man story stripped of any of the characters whimsy and joy and set in an ultra grim, authoritarian future where Mary Jane has died from long term exposure to Peter Parker's radioactive sperm. Oh, and it would be really great if every page was actively unpleasant to look at," then brother do I have the graphic novel for you!

  3. 4 out of 5

    John

    This attempt to do a "Dark Knight Returns" for Spidey has some germs of good ideas but nothing gels very well. Interesting and somewhat touching at first, but becomes muddled and boring. This attempt to do a "Dark Knight Returns" for Spidey has some germs of good ideas but nothing gels very well. Interesting and somewhat touching at first, but becomes muddled and boring.

  4. 4 out of 5

    JB

    There are so many things I love about this book! The references to nursery rhymes that fit the story perfectly, the totally different take on Spider-Man and Peter Parker. The first pages are great. Those first ten pages paint a very gloomy Manhattan and a very old and beaten Spider-Man. I also love Jameson in this as some kind of crazy street prophet. That first splash page where we see Spider-Man slowly but surely returning, is pure magic. How great is it to see Spider-Man as an old man in his b There are so many things I love about this book! The references to nursery rhymes that fit the story perfectly, the totally different take on Spider-Man and Peter Parker. The first pages are great. Those first ten pages paint a very gloomy Manhattan and a very old and beaten Spider-Man. I also love Jameson in this as some kind of crazy street prophet. That first splash page where we see Spider-Man slowly but surely returning, is pure magic. How great is it to see Spider-Man as an old man in his boxers after a fight in his crouching Spider-Man pose. The panels and pages are very cinematic. The colors and art are very fitting for the story. We have the Sinner Six (in stead of the Sinister Six) who are sent after Spider-Man when he returns in his black costume. This story gets you emotionally invested, especially if you're a Spider-Man fan to begin with. One of my favorite moments in this, has to be the real return of Spider-Man. Where he fully emerges from the grave in his red and blue suit, screaming: Wherever there's a hang-up ... wherever there's a bang-up .. Here comes the SPIDER-MAAAAAAAANNNNN (words from the Spider-Man theme). I mean when you're reading this, you can hear him scream. From that moment on the gloomy feel and look of the story and art remain. But are now accompanied with the wisecracking fun of your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man. Spider-Man faces off against Electro, Hydro-Man, the Scorpion, Mysterio and Kraven the Hunter and he defeats every single one of them with ease because he fights without restraint, without hesitating. Beacause he has nothing left to live for, all he wants is to be reunited with Mary-Jane. The last page with a total of 6 panels is the perfect ending to a greatly written and drawn Spider-Man story. This one really is for the fans. I own it in hardcover and I’ll be hunting down the single issues (which means that I love it). The writer has written this story with his heart and soul. For all of the Spidey fans out there, read this! You won’t be disappointed.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jason

    I picked this up because it was listed on a few websites as one of the worst Spidey stories ever. I wouldn't say that, but I was definitely underwhelmed. The most fuss was made over Peter's radioactive semen--definitely an ill-advised plot point, but barely any time was spent on it. Otherwise, like everyone else says, it had a real Dark Knight Returns vibe, but not nearly as good. That's not necessarily a slight on Andrews (though he's a much better artist than writer), it's just that Peter Park I picked this up because it was listed on a few websites as one of the worst Spidey stories ever. I wouldn't say that, but I was definitely underwhelmed. The most fuss was made over Peter's radioactive semen--definitely an ill-advised plot point, but barely any time was spent on it. Otherwise, like everyone else says, it had a real Dark Knight Returns vibe, but not nearly as good. That's not necessarily a slight on Andrews (though he's a much better artist than writer), it's just that Peter Parker has a hard time being a dark anything. The most intense I've ever seen him was when he beat the pudding out of the Kingpin during Back in Black, and that had to do with his Aunt May. He's pretty much in denial about his anger (and a lot of other things). Bruce Wayne knows exactly what he's doing and what it's costing him psychologically, but he does it anyway.

  6. 5 out of 5

    FortressOfBookitude

    Nothing I've never read before. In the beginning it felt like this story was supposed to be "The Friendly Neighborhood Spider Returns" (without the grey morality or more than superficial social commentary of "The Dark Knight Returns"). Later on it turns into a generic execution of the "You can't simply stop being a hero just because you're on a guilt-trip"-trope. Nothing I've never read before. In the beginning it felt like this story was supposed to be "The Friendly Neighborhood Spider Returns" (without the grey morality or more than superficial social commentary of "The Dark Knight Returns"). Later on it turns into a generic execution of the "You can't simply stop being a hero just because you're on a guilt-trip"-trope.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Sud666

    Spiderman: Reign is a strange story. Written by Kaare Andrews, it takes place in an alternate reality that has nothing to do with the "normal" continuity. NYC has become an independent authoritarian police state known as the "Reign". As the Reign has cracked down on crime and outlawed superheroes, there is ostensibly peace. There isn't. The laws are brutally oppressive and the media/political complex feed you propaganda. Spiderman, in this world, is in his 70's or 80s. Mary Jane had died from canc Spiderman: Reign is a strange story. Written by Kaare Andrews, it takes place in an alternate reality that has nothing to do with the "normal" continuity. NYC has become an independent authoritarian police state known as the "Reign". As the Reign has cracked down on crime and outlawed superheroes, there is ostensibly peace. There isn't. The laws are brutally oppressive and the media/political complex feed you propaganda. Spiderman, in this world, is in his 70's or 80s. Mary Jane had died from cancer caused by his radioactive blood and Peter lives alone, poor and miserable as he talks to the ghost of his dead wife. One day, out of the blue, he is visited by the wreck of J. Jonah Jameson, who motivates Spiderman to come back. Spiderman then suits back up and inspires a whole new generation of people to fight the Reign. That's pretty much it. There are some great ideas here: The dark and oppressive theme of Spiderman's world is an interesting take and I thought it was rather unique and original. The execution falls a bit short- the idea of a geriatric Spiderman, who had his arm easily broken in the first few pages, then all of a sudden becomes...well....uh...young Spiderman and kicking ass is bizarre. As is the whole "little bratty kids standing up to armed police state thugs", for if things were truly that way-then how did the Reign take over to begin with? The artwork is pretty good, the story original but nothing great and the writing of the dialogue is actually quite good. All of this makes for a three star comic. A good read, though hardly "fun". It is a dark and grim look, with shades of bright thoughts for the future. I'll give it some credit for being different and unique. The idea behind the mastermind of this whole thing is a bit strange indeed. I didn't realize the symbiote had such long range strategic thinking. As I said it is an interesting idea, but perhaps lacking in the execution. Looking for something different? Try Spiderman Reign.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Charlotte

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Spider-Man killed Mary Jane with his jizz. That’s it. That’s the book.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cale

    What the hell was that? I'm not a big Spider-Man reader, but this is some Elseworlds style story, I guess, taking place in the distant future where Spider-Man has retired and Reign soldiers are running the town now, as the mayor tries to build a 'protective' web over the city. Then there's something about evil soldiers, a Spider-Man villain who is taking everything over, and using lots of other Sinister Six characters as underlings. The whole geriatric Spider-Man thing is unpleasant, and the sto What the hell was that? I'm not a big Spider-Man reader, but this is some Elseworlds style story, I guess, taking place in the distant future where Spider-Man has retired and Reign soldiers are running the town now, as the mayor tries to build a 'protective' web over the city. Then there's something about evil soldiers, a Spider-Man villain who is taking everything over, and using lots of other Sinister Six characters as underlings. The whole geriatric Spider-Man thing is unpleasant, and the story spends more time on his mental state than anything else. The art is gloomy and dark and unpleasant, which puts it in line with the story. Bells are used as weapons, and a group of kids are serving as some sort of resistance in a cult led by J. Jonah Jameson? I don't know, there are a lot of ideas thrown around here, but none of them really gel with each other or make much sense. This has the Marvel Knights Imprint on it, which makes me think it's a standalone series. I kind of hope so, because I can't imagine anything else matching this tone and basic insanity. Not recommended at all.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Daniel

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Andrews tries to make a Spider-Man version of the Dark Knight Returns, and it works better than expected. It's a brutal, hallucinogenic story set in a militaristic urban landscape; a big ball of War On Terrorism nerves, complete with cutaways to propagandistic news reporters. The art's even ugly, in that beautiful Frank Miller way. It's rough around the edges. A big revelation in the third issue is silly and handled poorly (Spider-cum???), and a late-game twist involving a new audience surrogate Andrews tries to make a Spider-Man version of the Dark Knight Returns, and it works better than expected. It's a brutal, hallucinogenic story set in a militaristic urban landscape; a big ball of War On Terrorism nerves, complete with cutaways to propagandistic news reporters. The art's even ugly, in that beautiful Frank Miller way. It's rough around the edges. A big revelation in the third issue is silly and handled poorly (Spider-cum???), and a late-game twist involving a new audience surrogate character doesn't feel earned at all. But otherwise solid stuff, and I'm definitely interested in checking out more of Kaare Andrews' work in the future.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jamil

    I surprised myself and kinda liked this book. Despite the inherent seediness of the whole thing - like when old man peter parker talks compares his sperm to cancerous spider's eggs (comics for kids!). Despite the overplayed homages to Dark Knight Returns (there's a character named "Miller Janson" for pete's sake in all those straight from the Dark Knight Returns telejournalist scenes). so yeah, & the art's kinda shaky, awkward, weak digital lines...EXCEPT, when spider man reappears in his costum I surprised myself and kinda liked this book. Despite the inherent seediness of the whole thing - like when old man peter parker talks compares his sperm to cancerous spider's eggs (comics for kids!). Despite the overplayed homages to Dark Knight Returns (there's a character named "Miller Janson" for pete's sake in all those straight from the Dark Knight Returns telejournalist scenes). so yeah, & the art's kinda shaky, awkward, weak digital lines...EXCEPT, when spider man reappears in his costume, and does his thing. man, I felt joy in those moments, watching his rough ballet. they remind me of drawings of spider man you do when you are a kid where all the magic is in spidey's body language and in fingertips.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jon Klosterman

    This book sucks ass! Not only is it trying to hard to be like the master piece that is the dark knight returns it also has convoluted plot lines that make no freaking sense. Spider-man is hallucinating about his dead wife but the only reason he is so depressed in the first place is because he killed her with his radioactive jizz. I shit you not he killed Mary Jane with his radioactive fucking baby gravy. I liked how the story started but when Spider-man mentioned that while hugging her dead corps This book sucks ass! Not only is it trying to hard to be like the master piece that is the dark knight returns it also has convoluted plot lines that make no freaking sense. Spider-man is hallucinating about his dead wife but the only reason he is so depressed in the first place is because he killed her with his radioactive jizz. I shit you not he killed Mary Jane with his radioactive fucking baby gravy. I liked how the story started but when Spider-man mentioned that while hugging her dead corpse I was just done. and don't get me started on the hypno hustlers return basically he's an old disco guy who makes people dance uncontrollably.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Alan Hoffman

    Has an elderly, depressed and tormented Peter Parker of the future, who gave up fighting crime after Mary Jane died. As the artist said, he liked his covers better after they included an element of physical or emotional pain. Intriguing and well done - drew me in much more than a lot of flashier Spider-Man collections: this one stood out, though it's very somber. I don't know if it's intentional, but the book shares some similarities, such as its tone and illustration style, with Frank Miller's Has an elderly, depressed and tormented Peter Parker of the future, who gave up fighting crime after Mary Jane died. As the artist said, he liked his covers better after they included an element of physical or emotional pain. Intriguing and well done - drew me in much more than a lot of flashier Spider-Man collections: this one stood out, though it's very somber. I don't know if it's intentional, but the book shares some similarities, such as its tone and illustration style, with Frank Miller's Dark Knight.

  14. 4 out of 5

    J Park

    Amazing. So good I gave away copies as Christmas Presents.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Galley

    Spider-Man: Reign is a curious beast and not in a good way. I’ve long stated in conversations with friends that not every character works telling the same story. Usually these conversations end up with my declaration that the film Logan was perfectly suited for that character considering all the context that we have around him. Doing the exact same thing with Green Lantern on the other hand wouldn’t work as well considering the perceived goofiness of the character and lack of context. From what Spider-Man: Reign is a curious beast and not in a good way. I’ve long stated in conversations with friends that not every character works telling the same story. Usually these conversations end up with my declaration that the film Logan was perfectly suited for that character considering all the context that we have around him. Doing the exact same thing with Green Lantern on the other hand wouldn’t work as well considering the perceived goofiness of the character and lack of context. From what I’d read before diving into Reign (considering the PS4 game, the MCU and Spider-Verse we’re in a golden age of Spider-Man content) it was held to be one of the darker, more serious takes on the character. I don’t think that anyone that is reasonably versed in the world of superhero stories would argue that Reign is aspiring to be the Spider-Man version of the incredibly well-revered The Dark Knight Returns. I read the latter for the first time last year and whilst I admired the book for what it did (along with Watchmen) for comics as a whole, I think that most of the people singing its praises are doing so more for its legacy than its quality in and of itself. It’s a good story, but I wouldn’t consider it the best of the Caped Crusader. The sequels… better left not talked about. So the problems of Reign first become apparent when you realise that it is trying to do is mimic what Frank Miller did with Batman, but just applying it to Marvel’s flagship character. For the record I don’t think it’s impossible to tell a dark Spider-Man story. After all Kraven’s Last Hunt is a good, if flawed, darker take on one of the character’s stock adversaries and is consistent with the world of the Web-Slinger even if it’s a bit on the darker end. I’m also very fond of the Noir Universe because it decides to pick a different theme and goes all out with it. The reason I brought up TDKR is simple: it was written for that character specifically and wasn’t trying to mimic anything else. Sure being the first isn’t inherently a suggestion that you did it best but TDKR was clearly its own story and not imitating something that came before it. The biggest reason that Reign didn’t work for me was just how generic and repetitive it felt within this idea of a dark reimagining. I am all for the subversion of a character or classic story, and I absolutely adore when creative groups take risks even if they don’t succeed. Recent examples include The Last Jedi (which I unapologetically loved) and the latest album by the Arctic Monkeys (I certainly didn’t like it, but it was a distinct album that I’m glad was what they wanted to release). The fact that this isn’t a typically positive and wacky Spider-Man story is not the problem: the problem is that it isn’t told particularly well. Like I said at the beginning of this review, not every story works well for every character and it can often feel like shoving a square peck in a circular hole. When you’re writing a dark story for a character who isn’t renowned for being grim and gritty you have to look at the story you’re trying to tell and bring people aboard. Reign feels cynical and lazy. At first I thought that it was going to be interesting at the very least. Yeah it’s going to rip right out of the playbook of TDKR but there were a few notable differences. Bruce Wayne was a millionaire who was able to do so much leisure after giving up the crimefighting lifestyle, whereas Peter Parker was poor and still struggling with things such as rent and balancing relationships. I hoped that this was a sign that despite similarities in terms of tone and the world it was set in, the stories would be told differently enough that I could treat them separate. That didn’t end up being the case. When reading Reign I had to ask myself who the book was written for. Aside from clearly trying to be the Spider-Man version of TDKR it didn’t seem to know whether it was for Spidey loyalists who’ve followed the character in his many adventures, or whether this was for newcomers. A lot of the details in the story seemed to be trying too hard because we’d never seen it before (which only works if you have an indication as to the Spider-Man canon) or so basic a version of a character that you’d swear they were based on adaptations or a quick Wikipedia search. It couldn’t make its mind up which made it a difficult story to engage with. Let me make it abundantly clear: being different or trying to subvert is not inherently a good thing. You are not going to get creativity points from me just because you’re doing something different. Additionally, whilst I’m all for taking the stories and giving them the option to stand alone, without having to be compared to others or held up to previous lore and legacy, this isn’t something I’m prepared to do when the whole point of your changes are to be subversive of what’s come before. JJ’s is pointless from a narrative standpoint unless you’re familiar of the character’s history. One of the big reveals in this book is that Mary Jane died owing to her sexual relationship with Peter Parker. It goes into detail about the cause of how it happened, and it’s clear that it’s introduced in the story to add a level of guilt to Parker. The trouble is that this seems to be done for more of a shock or proof that this is going to be a “dark mature story” than it does an organic fit. Frankly I found it to be way too try-hardy and didn’t seem to serve a purpose. I get why it’s intended to be there: much like Gwen Stacy where Parker’s involvement is one of the defining moments of his life that he needs to forgive himself for, Mary Jane has got her turn albeit later on in life. The problem? It paints Parker in an unforgivingly selfish light. He knows what he is doing and does it anyway. The biggest problem though was simply: what is the point? What are we getting from this story about Spider-Man that warrants it being so violent. At least something grim and dark, such as Ruins is trying to comment on what the real world would be like for the characters. Reign is just trying to be dark and gritty because it’s apparently cool. It’s seen another story get revered over the course of entertainment history and tried to rip it. If you want dark and gritty, just go read TDKR. If you want a darker Spider-Man story, go for Kraven’s Last Hunt. Reign longs to be taken seriously but instead of the being the deep subversion that it thinks it is, it’s actually the teenager who has dyed his hair black and called himself an anarchist because he thinks it’s edgy. Don’t bother with Reign.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Anderson

    I’ve heard Spider-Man: Reign is one of the worst comics involving the titular character. I wouldn’t know (since I usually keep my comics more focused on Batman and The Avengers), but to say Reign is a good example would be definitely stretching things quite a bit. Andrews had a good idea. Sure it was somewhat of a rip off of Miller’s seminal classic Dark Knight Returns, but most readers want to see a future fictional story where their favorite superheroes come back out of retirement to fight agai I’ve heard Spider-Man: Reign is one of the worst comics involving the titular character. I wouldn’t know (since I usually keep my comics more focused on Batman and The Avengers), but to say Reign is a good example would be definitely stretching things quite a bit. Andrews had a good idea. Sure it was somewhat of a rip off of Miller’s seminal classic Dark Knight Returns, but most readers want to see a future fictional story where their favorite superheroes come back out of retirement to fight against a city that had suppressed freedom and free will. Hell, that’s a freaking trope of almost all speculative fiction (whether novels or comics). The thing though, is that, unlike Dark Knight, Reign just doesn’t work. Andrews’s story of an old Peter Parker donning his famous mantle doesn’t hold up or make much sense. It’s a comic book so of course it’s not gonna be realistic, yet even here, trying to believe that Parker, who’s like 80, can throw his suit back on and take on the symbiote like it’s no big thing, is just too far this time around. The whole subplot of Parker having cancerous semen leading to MJ’s death could have been interesting but it was a throw away reference, a simple vehicle to explain why Parker is still mourning her death. In fact, there were a lot of moments that Andrews could have expanded on, yet left hanging, leaving huge plot holes and lack of explanation. I suppose some of those ideas could have been better understood through inherent fandom, however, for me, those money’s left me more confused than pleased. Andrews’s artwork is...interesting and definitely different from typical comic book fare. I liked the look and feel of his dystopian New York. However his over reliance on pre-rendered computer graphics (the guy couldn’t even draw a gun), quickly got old. It also lead to some confusing panels. I guess if you’re a hardcore Spidey fan, this could appeal to you, but for basic simpletons like myself, Reign could easily have been skipped over.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Christian Smith

    Story (Kaare Andrews): 8/10 Art (Kaare Andrews with Jose Villarrubia): 5/10 PARENTS GUIDE Age Level: 13+ Violence: 7/10 Many people are punched and hit in this volume with quite a bit of blood in result. Hey man is shot and is seen lying in a pool of blood from far away. Very brief A kid is impaled with a sword and bleeds on the ground dead. Spiderman has two big fight scenes that results in quite a bit of blood from the action. A man cuts someone's throat and blood spurts out. A man is bit in the mouth Story (Kaare Andrews): 8/10 Art (Kaare Andrews with Jose Villarrubia): 5/10 PARENTS GUIDE Age Level: 13+ Violence: 7/10 Many people are punched and hit in this volume with quite a bit of blood in result. Hey man is shot and is seen lying in a pool of blood from far away. Very brief A kid is impaled with a sword and bleeds on the ground dead. Spiderman has two big fight scenes that results in quite a bit of blood from the action. A man cuts someone's throat and blood spurts out. A man is bit in the mouth by a corpse and blood gushes forward. Sex/Nudity: 3/10 An averagely quick bed scene between an old man and his elderly wife. Nothing very graphic at all. A brief reference to someone irradiating his wife when he had sex with her. Profanity: 3/10 A few "D" words A censored "A" word that looks too much like the actual word: @$$ A man says mother---. But is cut off from saying the rest. Drugs/Alcohol: 2/10 very brief scene where a couple of men are seen drinking beers in a bar.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rocky Sunico

    Spider-Man: Reign definitely feels like an attempt to tell a Dark Knight returns style story but focused on Spider-Man instead of Batman. Beyond the somewhat dystopian future setting and an older, retired Spider-Man, even the art style shares echoes of TDKR, at least in my mind. Comparisons aside, it's a fairly interesting story where we are thrust into a future where New York appears to be free of both costumed heroes and villains and on the brink of implementing a new force field web system to Spider-Man: Reign definitely feels like an attempt to tell a Dark Knight returns style story but focused on Spider-Man instead of Batman. Beyond the somewhat dystopian future setting and an older, retired Spider-Man, even the art style shares echoes of TDKR, at least in my mind. Comparisons aside, it's a fairly interesting story where we are thrust into a future where New York appears to be free of both costumed heroes and villains and on the brink of implementing a new force field web system to completely cover the city and prevent unrestricted outside entry. It's a weird reality and one that begs many questions, which one has to credit the writer for. The sheer different-ness of this far off future versus what we know of contemporary Spider-Man leads to natural questions that beg for answers. Don't expect amazing fight scenes though, as we're still dealing with a geriatric Spider-Man after all. But we do great character moments and powerful moments of the human spirit persevering - things that have always a part of the Spider-Man narrative across the years.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Davede

    Spidey is not a Dark Knight This plot is shamelessly stolen from The Dark Knight Returns. One might argue that since TDKR transformed the silly Batman from the 60s TV show into one of the coolest comic characters ever, that the same would work for Spider-Man. They both have tragic origin stories, both operate mainly in the equivalent of New York, and both have impressive arrays of classic enemies. One could argue that the grittification of the Masked Crusader would work for the Puny Parker. Such Spidey is not a Dark Knight This plot is shamelessly stolen from The Dark Knight Returns. One might argue that since TDKR transformed the silly Batman from the 60s TV show into one of the coolest comic characters ever, that the same would work for Spider-Man. They both have tragic origin stories, both operate mainly in the equivalent of New York, and both have impressive arrays of classic enemies. One could argue that the grittification of the Masked Crusader would work for the Puny Parker. Such a one forgets everything about why Spidey is so beloved. Unlike the Bat, he has always been in his element in being bright, cheery, and fun. His optimism in the face of danger made him who he was. His cracking jokes while cracking skulls was unique to him. He didn’t need a bleak, hopeless, and dismal personality to come into himself. It doesn’t work for the friendly neighborhood Spider-Man. Also, the art was really globular, blurry, and all around annoying.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ralph Wark

    One of the best Spidey story. Why? Because it does what Marvel does best, bring out the humanity in the characters. Peter is now an old man, beaten down by life and the death of Mary Jane (takes a while to realize that). New York is ruled by a narcissistic power grabbing control freak who suspends basic rights for the "protection of the people". Crap like it always is. Spidey has to fight the ghosts of his past, and then literally fight his old foes Electro,Mysterio, and Sandman.we even get to see One of the best Spidey story. Why? Because it does what Marvel does best, bring out the humanity in the characters. Peter is now an old man, beaten down by life and the death of Mary Jane (takes a while to realize that). New York is ruled by a narcissistic power grabbing control freak who suspends basic rights for the "protection of the people". Crap like it always is. Spidey has to fight the ghosts of his past, and then literally fight his old foes Electro,Mysterio, and Sandman.we even get to see the human side of Sandman. Who knew? The protective web touted by the mayor is an excuse to hold in the populace so the big bad behind him can have his minions kill them. A very worthy read,I was pleasantly surprised how good it was. Try it, on Prime reading too.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Charlie Longman

    An interesting idea for a curious reader. I had to check to see if this was fan fiction. You read that summary and you instantly just assume that someone just re wrote TDKR by Frank Millar. But swapped out Batman for Spidey. That’s pretty much the gist and it’s a good idea with a lot of the same and/or similar beats and tone. But sadly it’s not Frank Millar at the helm and it truly shows. Like I said this felt like fan fiction at first and I can only recommend to people who really LOVE Spider-Man An interesting idea for a curious reader. I had to check to see if this was fan fiction. You read that summary and you instantly just assume that someone just re wrote TDKR by Frank Millar. But swapped out Batman for Spidey. That’s pretty much the gist and it’s a good idea with a lot of the same and/or similar beats and tone. But sadly it’s not Frank Millar at the helm and it truly shows. Like I said this felt like fan fiction at first and I can only recommend to people who really LOVE Spider-Man or Millars work with Batman enough to get what’s being done here. Any casual reader may be put off.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Gregory R. Miller

    Maybe I was a little late to the party on this one? I'm not trying to be a snob but knowing nothing of Kaare Andrews I can take no guesses at the personal motives. It's not easy writing a single book story and adapting it to four books for a series. I have to compliment the artist on the art, and it's a lot of the storytelling with this one. I would not enjoy reading this a second time. I found it interesting the first read through and that's no insult. It was a very dark story. There are things Maybe I was a little late to the party on this one? I'm not trying to be a snob but knowing nothing of Kaare Andrews I can take no guesses at the personal motives. It's not easy writing a single book story and adapting it to four books for a series. I have to compliment the artist on the art, and it's a lot of the storytelling with this one. I would not enjoy reading this a second time. I found it interesting the first read through and that's no insult. It was a very dark story. There are things I definitely did not like at all, and that's why I will remember it enough not to read it a second time. I hope that makes sense to you, dear reader true believers!

  23. 4 out of 5

    One Flew

    2.5 stars This book is Spiderman's Dark Knight, or Wolverine's Old Man Logan, only problem is it doesn't work. The only reason I'm giving this book 3 stars rather than 2 is because the artwork is gorgeous. The story is simple enough but the structure is a bit of a mess. The plot is needlessly confusing in places and some of the action sequences don't fit together properly. There are a lot of interesting ideas and great elements in Reign, it just didn't come off. If the villians were less one dime 2.5 stars This book is Spiderman's Dark Knight, or Wolverine's Old Man Logan, only problem is it doesn't work. The only reason I'm giving this book 3 stars rather than 2 is because the artwork is gorgeous. The story is simple enough but the structure is a bit of a mess. The plot is needlessly confusing in places and some of the action sequences don't fit together properly. There are a lot of interesting ideas and great elements in Reign, it just didn't come off. If the villians were less one dimensional and the narrative was more coherent this could have been one of the definitive Spiderman stories, as it stands it's an okay story with some exceptional artwork.

  24. 4 out of 5

    adam j cuthbert

    The Dark Web-Head Returns So-so comic. Had been on my list for years. As the headline indicates, the story is reminiscent of Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns: a dystopian future awaits the return of a hero, long since retired. Not a fan of the artwork: it's frankly ugly and unappealing, and the combination of 3D digital backgrounds with traditional art doesn't work for me. The story, compared to The Dark Knight Returns, is very poor. The Dark Web-Head Returns So-so comic. Had been on my list for years. As the headline indicates, the story is reminiscent of Frank Miller's The Dark Knight Returns: a dystopian future awaits the return of a hero, long since retired. Not a fan of the artwork: it's frankly ugly and unappealing, and the combination of 3D digital backgrounds with traditional art doesn't work for me. The story, compared to The Dark Knight Returns, is very poor.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jason Burton

    Amazing Heartbreakingly good. A strange but gripping read that puts you at unease yet still manages to deliver a satisfying punch. It definitely has a dark humour to it that feels almost bitter but it also builds up to a poignant finish that acts as an alkali to balance it all out.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Joyce

    Spider-Man's Dark Knight Rises Someone else reviewed this and likened it to The Dark Knight Rises, and I agree. It's a great story set a little ways in the future. It takes a bit to get oriented,but once you do, you can really enjoy the story. Not really for kids, but for older readers, would definitely recommend Spider-Man's Dark Knight Rises Someone else reviewed this and likened it to The Dark Knight Rises, and I agree. It's a great story set a little ways in the future. It takes a bit to get oriented,but once you do, you can really enjoy the story. Not really for kids, but for older readers, would definitely recommend

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ari Cohen

    Wow, old Spidey Is still Spidey, with the same sense of responsibility and odd humor. It's stories like these that show why we all love the Spider and come back to him again and again. Wow, old Spidey Is still Spidey, with the same sense of responsibility and odd humor. It's stories like these that show why we all love the Spider and come back to him again and again.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Swain

    If the Dark Knight Returns was made for Spidey, it would be REIGN Very good. Quick and interesting read on the characters, not cannon though. If you've got an hour and fancy a bleak amd serious Spidey story, go at it. If the Dark Knight Returns was made for Spidey, it would be REIGN Very good. Quick and interesting read on the characters, not cannon though. If you've got an hour and fancy a bleak amd serious Spidey story, go at it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Christopher Collier

    Meh Not sure why so many people recommend this graphic novel, maybe that set my expectations too high, but I was less than impressed. There are so many Spider-Man stories that are much better than this one.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Surya

    What an awesome story Probably the best of old superhero stories. Does not step away from the friendly neighborhood spiderman paradigm. Do read. Watch out for surprise guest appearances

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