website statistics Irish Hearts - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Irish Hearts

Availability: Ready to download

Two complete novels.Adelia Cunnane. Her hot temper sent the heart of Travis Grant aflame. Now the proud, powerful owner of Royal Meadows horse farm resolved to make this wild Irish Thoroughbred his own.Erin McKinnon. A bold beauty, she accepted Burke Logan's loveless proposal and his cool promise of security and wealth. But could this ravishing Irish Rose win her hard-hear Two complete novels.Adelia Cunnane. Her hot temper sent the heart of Travis Grant aflame. Now the proud, powerful owner of Royal Meadows horse farm resolved to make this wild Irish Thoroughbred his own.Erin McKinnon. A bold beauty, she accepted Burke Logan's loveless proposal and his cool promise of security and wealth. But could this ravishing Irish Rose win her hard-hearted husband's love?


Compare

Two complete novels.Adelia Cunnane. Her hot temper sent the heart of Travis Grant aflame. Now the proud, powerful owner of Royal Meadows horse farm resolved to make this wild Irish Thoroughbred his own.Erin McKinnon. A bold beauty, she accepted Burke Logan's loveless proposal and his cool promise of security and wealth. But could this ravishing Irish Rose win her hard-hear Two complete novels.Adelia Cunnane. Her hot temper sent the heart of Travis Grant aflame. Now the proud, powerful owner of Royal Meadows horse farm resolved to make this wild Irish Thoroughbred his own.Erin McKinnon. A bold beauty, she accepted Burke Logan's loveless proposal and his cool promise of security and wealth. But could this ravishing Irish Rose win her hard-hearted husband's love?

30 review for Irish Hearts

  1. 5 out of 5

    Mo

    Please people, don't think irish people are like this. The "heroine" came across as being from the back end of beyond not having a clue about anything. Don't mind her being a virgin - we all were at some stage and me, being Irish, was probably one a lot longer than most, especially as I am Catholic along with that. I never read another Nora Roberts after this. Nobody in Ireland says "aye" or calls someone Mistress Bowers or whoever it was ... read the first story and could not finish it. Pains m Please people, don't think irish people are like this. The "heroine" came across as being from the back end of beyond not having a clue about anything. Don't mind her being a virgin - we all were at some stage and me, being Irish, was probably one a lot longer than most, especially as I am Catholic along with that. I never read another Nora Roberts after this. Nobody in Ireland says "aye" or calls someone Mistress Bowers or whoever it was ... read the first story and could not finish it. Pains me to give it even one star. "A curse on you, Travis Grant" ... she is not Maureen O'Hara in The Quiet Man (a film I love by the way) ... c'mon, any self-respecting Irish woman would turn around and say "Travis, go f**k yourself, you assh**e".

  2. 4 out of 5

    Somia

    I haven’t re-read the two books in this paperback in years, but I’m glad I found it however unintentionally, at least when it comes to book 1, both were, to varying degrees easy, light reads, but I found myself more engaged with book 1. With both books there are little things I noticed this time around that I didn’t as a teen, the joys of growing up. Book 1: Irish Thoroughbred: 3 COMFY STARS This was easy light read, I may not have loved it as I did as a teen, but still an enjoyable read. Adelia C I haven’t re-read the two books in this paperback in years, but I’m glad I found it however unintentionally, at least when it comes to book 1, both were, to varying degrees easy, light reads, but I found myself more engaged with book 1. With both books there are little things I noticed this time around that I didn’t as a teen, the joys of growing up. Book 1: Irish Thoroughbred: 3 COMFY STARS This was easy light read, I may not have loved it as I did as a teen, but still an enjoyable read. Adelia Cunnane, after loosing her aunt and finding it impossible to take care of the farm she and her aunt shared travels to the US to be with her uncle, who works for and lives on the ranch of Travis Grant. The sparks and tension between Travis and Adelia were clear from the get go. There were moments were Travis really irked me, but overall, it wasn't so bad that I found myself disliking him. I do wish Adelia was depicted as less naïve and oblivious when it came to certain matters, I liked her fire but at times she felt somewhat childish. I did like how skilled she was with horses, and the fact that all those who thought she was too delicate to work with them soon realised how fab she was. A word of caution as this discrepancy may peeve you off, I have friends from Ireland and have interacted with people who were born and raised there, and so far, none of those I have interacted with speak as Adelia does, in fact her speech patterns reminded me more of the actress Maureen O’Hara in her movies (she starred in several movies with John Wayne, and some great pirate movies). Book 2: Irish Rose - 3 OK-ISH & Tepid STARS This second book centres around Erin McKinnon and Burke Logan. It takes place about 7 years after the first book, Erin and Adelia are cousins. Burke goes to Ireland with Adeline her family, which is how the two main characters in this book are able to meet. From the onset it is clear there is something sizzling between the two. So it's no surprise that Burke strikes a deal with Erin - she gets to come to the US by working for him as a bookkeeper. It’s an opportunity that Erin jumps at. The attraction between the two is one they both try and resist, on top of this there is a touch of mystery to the plot, all together this should have resulted in me enjoying this re-read far more than I did. It has taken me a while to get back to the second book and read it, I simply wasn’t in the mood. It’s not a bad read, I just couldn’t sink into it this time around, neither is it one of my favourites by Roberts, and it’ll be a long time before I go back to it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Melanie

    Nope. BEYOND awful. Ditched it 50 pages in. I got this at a used book sale and was fooled by the 2011 date on it. That's the REPUBLISHED date. These are actually from 1981/88 and ridiculously dated. Take your grown-ass woman who is written like a 12 year old of low intelligence and the boorish man who bruises her with 'love' and boot them right back to the 80's, thanks. Nope. BEYOND awful. Ditched it 50 pages in. I got this at a used book sale and was fooled by the 2011 date on it. That's the REPUBLISHED date. These are actually from 1981/88 and ridiculously dated. Take your grown-ass woman who is written like a 12 year old of low intelligence and the boorish man who bruises her with 'love' and boot them right back to the 80's, thanks.

  4. 5 out of 5

    ♥ WishfulMiss ♥

    Nora Roberts know how to write engaging characters. One of my all time favorites is Three Fates and Irish Hearts definitely has the same feel to it. In Irish Thoroughbred, Adelia aka Dee can't fight her attraction for Travis Grant any more than she can fight her need to find a home and belong. She was a great MC, her personality, her emotion, and her vitality was sweet, I loved that she was so unique in action and thoughts. Travis was your typical brooding alpha, a bit domineering and stubborn, b Nora Roberts know how to write engaging characters. One of my all time favorites is Three Fates and Irish Hearts definitely has the same feel to it. In Irish Thoroughbred, Adelia aka Dee can't fight her attraction for Travis Grant any more than she can fight her need to find a home and belong. She was a great MC, her personality, her emotion, and her vitality was sweet, I loved that she was so unique in action and thoughts. Travis was your typical brooding alpha, a bit domineering and stubborn, but ultimately a man dealing with falling in love for the first time. This was a clean romance (only kissing and petting, love scenes fade to black) with enough steam to keep you satisfied. The chemistry burst forward between Dee and Travis with every encounter! This goes to show you that you can still tell a good story without going too much into detail. It was also a safe read. (Travis does have an ex that tries to make trouble but it was very short lived.) In the Irish Rose the story is a bit more angsty and with a lot more push and pull between Erin and Burke. Erin has the same wonder for America that Dee had but she was a more ambitious person. The attraction was still hot but I didn't relate to the h as instantly as I did with Dee. Erin and Burke were a very complex couple and their relationship was a lot more bumpy that Dee'e was with Travis. It was interesting and I didn't have a hard time reading through it but it was missing that special charm/softened emotion that the first had. Towards the end I was feeling for both Burke and Erin - they wanted the same thing they just had a hard time expressing it to each other. That drawn out suspense dragged a little but it was still a cute read. Loved that Dee and Travis (and their adorable family!) made an appearance and I was a sucker for the surprise pregnancy at the end. Both are safe reads - very sweet and classic Nora Roberts!

  5. 5 out of 5

    TiffanyLamp

    Considering this was Nora's first novel (or one of them) I can say that they aren't terrible. For someone who enjoys romance novels, this is for you. I do not enjoy romance novels myself and here is why: I do not enjoy the helplessness of the female characters. The men are typically rich douchebags until they find the helpless virgin (again with virgins *rolling my eyes). The said virgin changes the rich douche, or in some cases, Womanizer, to become a well-rounded, good natured family man wit Considering this was Nora's first novel (or one of them) I can say that they aren't terrible. For someone who enjoys romance novels, this is for you. I do not enjoy romance novels myself and here is why: I do not enjoy the helplessness of the female characters. The men are typically rich douchebags until they find the helpless virgin (again with virgins *rolling my eyes). The said virgin changes the rich douche, or in some cases, Womanizer, to become a well-rounded, good natured family man with honest intentions. At some point, the woman - child of the story gets hurt, wakes up to find rich douche waiting for her. (With a boner ;) I could go on. But out of respect for the writer, I'll stop there. Nora Roberts has a way with words, I'll give her that. I've also come to the conclusion that she has a terribly sad way of describing Ireland and it's people. I gather this from any review I have read from an Irish woman, as I've never been to Ireland myself and I've only met irish americans. 2 stars for the rich douche bags with sexy hair and "piercing blue (or grey) eyes" though!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bobbi

    There were some off-putting comparisons between Adelia and a child. She is a grown woman even if she is small in stature.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Irish Thoroughbred: The book started corny & predictable. An exercise boy has been kicked by a horse who's said to be mean, but Adelia handles him as if she's the horse whisperer. Not a way to start a new job, by acting like you know more than the people already there,& pointing out what they're doing wrong. She says they don't understand the horse,& after talking to him he lets her ride him. Then she has to show the vet up by finding out the foal is turned wrong. It became repetitive & predictabl Irish Thoroughbred: The book started corny & predictable. An exercise boy has been kicked by a horse who's said to be mean, but Adelia handles him as if she's the horse whisperer. Not a way to start a new job, by acting like you know more than the people already there,& pointing out what they're doing wrong. She says they don't understand the horse,& after talking to him he lets her ride him. Then she has to show the vet up by finding out the foal is turned wrong. It became repetitive & predictable the way Travis would always suddenly appear wherever Adelia was, if she went to the stables, if she was off by herself. I wasn't very far in, almost 80 pages,& it had already happened a handful of times. The word love was thrown out too quickly. They didn't even know each other. The customary near-rape of the heroine so the hero could come to her rescue that's found in older books was in here. It irritated me she didn't want to call the police. You're just letting him go free so he can do it to someone else. Even though she'd only been on the horse farm a short time, Travis took her to the Kentucky Derby, and not one of the men who'd been there longer and deserve it. Because the horse responds the best to her. This heroine was a special snowflake. It seemed unrealistic that the press would care who Travis was dating. When I watch the triple crown races, I don't see reporters delving into their personal lives, or wondering if they're in a relationship with one of their grooms. That might be because most owners seem to be married,& most grooms seem to be men, but still. The book was going good until her uncle had a heart attack, asked Travis to take care of her,& Travis somehow interpreted that as marrying her. And then had the gall-the effing nerve-to say this to Adelia: "Doesn't he mean anything to you? Are you so selfish and hardheaded that you can't make a small sacrifice to help him? We'll stand in that room this afternoon, and we'll be married, and you'll make him believe it's what you want. When we know he's strong enough, you can get a divorce and end it." Was I confused in thinking Padrick was simply wanting a priest to pray over him? How did that get twisted & misconstrued as him wanting Travis to MARRY his niece? He just wanted Travis to take care of her. Marrying is not taking care of. And I'm sorry, a 'small sacrifice?' Marriage isn't a small sacrifice, tis a bloody big one. Every time he held her hands & wouldn't let her pull them away, any time he had a hold of her & wouldn't let her go, made me wanna punch him in the face. He tells her to cry & she says she never cries. But Travis refuses to let her go and of course she cries. Because even though she apparently didn't cry when both her parents and her aunt died, she cries now. Why? Because Travis told her to. And this hero, like so many others, will not be denied. If the hero says cry, then you better produce some tears. It sickened me when she said "I'll do whatever you think has to be done." She already has a job and a home at Travis' farm, what more does he have to give her? Marriage, apparently. Paddy should have rested freaking easy. She's trying to think of a way out of it,& I'm waiting for it too. She says she's Catholic & can't get a divorce. And of course the mighty hero has an answer for that. They can get an annulment as long as the marriage isn't consummated. Well, I could freaking guess what would happen there. The fact that it was passed off as some great thing, some charitable act, incensed me further. As if Paddy would die if they didn't. What comfort is marrying a man who doesn't love you? Better to be on your own. She actually asks Travis if she can call her uncle at the hospital. Of course the controlling hero has already done that, preventing her need to call. She finds out they have a cook: '"Don't look so stricken, Dee. Hannah will think I'm beating you already."' Ex-fucking-cuse me? Beating you already? As in you're going to eventually beat your wife? Did that pass as humor back then? The whole marrying to protect someone felt like the 1800s. Seriously, who does that?! If Adelia was as independent as she claims, she wouldn't need a man's help anyway. And surely there were friends or someone in Ireland to help her. The whole thing was very old-fashioned, better befitting of a historical novel. Travis was 31, or going to turn 31. Adelia was described as young, & had young, firm breasts. Emphasis on that. And her going to her uncle as if she needed a guardian, & not saying her age just gave me dirty vibes, as if she was barely out of HS, or still a minor. Travis was too suave & sophisticated, & it felt like he was toying w/ Adelia. Just messing around with her because she was there. Not very respectable to do when her uncle works for you. Then not letting her go on a date with that reporter, claiming his workers' lives are his business. And of course he gets his way. She doesn't go on the date. In typical romance author fashion, the guy is rich & buys things for the heroine, taking her to fancy restaurants, sending her on shopping sprees with his money, to buy her a new wardrobe to befit his lifestyle. It's sickening. Idk why they even have the heroine protest. They might as well have their hand out, cause they're not gonna turn it down. This heroine was a bit like a disney character, with her glorious hair & a smile compared to the radiance of the sun. I've never seen someone have so much trouble w/ their hair as heroines in novels do. Like it's this huge mass that's always hanging in their face and they have to push at it like it can't be tamed. She has magical eyes, that convince people to do anything she wants, & can tame any animal. We aren't told her age until pg 175 of a 196-page story. She's 23 which is better than I was thinking. Here's some lovely thoughts: 'He never raised his voice or criticized, and he never touched her in any way unless strictly necessary. She wished fervently that he would yell at her or shake her, or do something to lose his cool, composed manner.' '"I had thought to give her to you next month for your birthday, but I thought your spirits needed a lift, so she's yours a bit early." "But after the way I've been acting, you should have been beating me instead of buying me a present." "The thought entered my mind last night, but this seemed a better solution."' I was so annoyed when she goes to the airport intending to go back to Ireland only to have him stop her before she even gets a ticket. I wanted him to chase her to Ireland. His declaration of love was too little too late. And if that's his way of showing love, idk what the hell his hatred would look like. He's been cold & indifferent towards her. Surely he could see that Dee loved him from the beginning, so why the need to wear her down? Why not confess your feelings & propose? "I had no intention of divorcing a wife I loved, now, or any time within the next thousand years." When she says he should have told her he loved her & it would have saved them a lot of trouble, he says how could he when she was raging at him? She means before the fight, before Margot came. It was very predictable Margot would show up, btw. It was sweet when he confesses he took her to the horse races not just for Majesty, but because he didn't want to let her out of his sight, because someone would snatch her away. "I decided to wear you down slowly. I thought I was making some headway, but Paddy's heart attack changed everything. I felt the best way to help him was to assure him of your welfare, so I railroaded you into marriage with the promise of an annulment. Of course I never intended to give you one." This makes no sense & is the opposite of romantic. If you're trying too woo her then why not do it? Why treat her like a friend, or cousin, as she said? '"You seemed so far away. All those weeks you never even touched me. You never even said you loved me last night." "I didn't dare touch you. I wanted you so much it was driving me mad. If I had told you I loved you last night-and how I wanted to!-you might have thought I said it just to keep you in bed."' Why would she think that? If you were sweet & declared your feelings from the start she would have married you when you asked! I'm wondering how this could be a standalone when it's only 196 pages. This wasn't romantic. The forced marriage was awful, the hero wasn't likable w/ his mood changes. The HEA was rushed. It became annoying & stayed that way til the end. It would have been so much better if Adelia had left for Ireland & he had to chase her. But he got his way in all things.& that's freaking annoying to me. Adelia was supposedly strong & independent but ultimately was just a doormat for the hero. She let him push her around, tell her what to do,& always gave in to his word. At one point she says she wants to do something for him,& asks what he needs from her. He responds with "the best thing you can do for me is to accept what's given and not question it." "All right, Travis, if it pleasures you."' My god, how truly sickening. I'd die before I uttered those words to a man. Spitfire, she isn't. I resented that he changed her wardrobe to fit his life. He told her to be herself, & that means him accepting her as she is, & however she dresses. I wish it had been in the heroes POV, but then we wouldn't have the surprise of his 'love' for her at the end. Special snowflake heroine, deplorable hero, annoying instalove & repetition. Everything was going pretty good until the totally random, stupid wedding. 2 stars. Irish Rose: This takes place 7 years later. The characters are too similar. Adelia was 23, Erin is 25, Travis was 31, Burke is 32. The heroines were practically the same character, down to their rough hands. They both even have red hair. Both are inexperienced, both love storms. As w/ the first book, the hero is always suddenly appearing & startling the heroine. Burke is rich too; it would be nice if heroes weren't always rich. Burke had an even nicer house than Travis.   Everything felt like been there done that. We watch Erin go to her first race & bet, just like Adelia did, while they have similar reactions to everything. Travis' horse always won & Burke's did too. The couples kiss after they win. It'd be easier to point out the ways the books were different. Erin was scared of horses. There. Also a case of instalove. The heroine loves him & doesn't know how he feels. Again, it's not enough the heroine is working for him, they have to be married too. Just like in the 1st book, after they marry the husbands tell the wives they don't have to work, & the heroines say they prefer to work. Erin ends up in the paper & questioned by reporters, like Adelia. The hero's horses always win w/ a lead which doesn't always happen in races.    POVs changed from one line to the next, which idl, but I'm glad it was in the heroes POV. Idl Burke's reputation w/ women: '"Idk much about women." At Travis's slow smile, Burke corrected himself. "Wives. But I'd say yours is happy, whether she's here or in the States. The fact is, Travis, if she loved you less I might have made a play for her myself." '"I've heard murmurs that a man not only has to watch his daughters but his wife when you're about." "If I was interested in another man's wife, you'd be the first to know."' Burke could be so rude. He called Erin a fool & an idiot.   Burke just happens to need a clerk which she just happens to be. When she's at his house, he tells her hopefully she won't have to ask him a bunch of annoying questions.  When she faints by the horse he calls her a nitwit and says "if you'd had the brains to tell me, you wouldn't have shaved ten years off my life."   "I feel...You'll think I'm foolish." "Probably." The dynamic of employer/employee made me uncomfortable, again, just like book one. He was taking advantage of the situation, admitted to hiring her to sleep w/ her, not just for work, using his power to control her. "When I find a woman who attracts me, I find a way to have her. Fair means or foul, it doesn't mean a damn to me." -"Tell me, did you bring me to America to sleep with you or to fix your books?" "Both," he said simply, "but we'll deal with business first." "Business is all we'll deal with. Now I'd like to begin." "Fine." But instead of leaving, he ran his hands up her arms. Erin stiffened, but didn't back away. She wouldn't play the fool and struggle.' How is struggling playing a fool? It's an instance where the heroine is protesting, yet the hero knows she desires him & won't take no for an answer. "An employee has rights in this country." Indeed. & it's not to have their employer hit on them. "The skinny blonde's still pouting after you. It must be rewarding to walk into a room and have six females trip over themselves to get to you." "It has its compensations." At her own party, where she's making him jealous with other men, he yanks her out. "We're leaving. Where's your coat?" "I'm not going anywhere, and I--" He merely stripped off his jacket and tossed it over her shoulders before he yanked her outside. "Get in the car." "Go to hell." He grabbed her then, hard and fast. "There'll be little doubt of that after tonight."' And what does the heroine do? Gets in the car, like a good little girl. And claims it's of her own choice. 'Burke braked at the base of the steps and without sparing her a glance, slammed the door and got out of the car.' This is a man who's intending to sleep w/ her.   This gem of a scene: "Now take your hands off me. I'm going home." "No, you're not." Her eyes narrowed. "You'll not keep me here." "Whatever it takes." Then she twisted under him. Before he realized her intent, her teeth were sunk into his hand. He swore, and they rolled from one end of the bed to the other before he managed to pin her again. "I'll draw blood next time, I swear it. Now let me go." "Shut up, you crazy Irish hothead."' His solution to them wanting each other & her not wanting to live with him & be his lover is marriage. What does this remind me of? Oh yeah, the quick marriage solution of book one. 'He was the only man she'd ever known. Now he'd done his best to be certain he was the only one she ever would. Selfish, yes, but a desperate man takes desperate measures.' 'She saw his hand close into a fist & angled her chin. "Go ahead, pop me one. You've been wanting to for days." "Don't tempt me." The HEA was rushed. I liked the transformation in Burke though it took too long to get there. The fact that the stories were too similar ruined it. This had sweet moments/good lines. Though Burke's was internal; he didn't share the thoughts out loud. Good stuff mixed in, but problematic heroes. A fitting St. Patrick's Day read. Fav quote: 'He'd played too many hands to give away the most important cards he'd ever held.' (Of marriage). 2.5 stars

  8. 4 out of 5

    Edwina Callan

    Light and fluffy and fun! A good time for a tired mind, almost a vacation for the brain. Sometimes we just need to giggle through a book, as if we were twelve years old again.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sadaf Shabbir

    Want to know this book in a single word? that is "Boring." There is no humor, no adventure and most of all no villain. The story starts smoothly with "Adelia" or shall I say a "Child" because in the whole plot the male protagonist "Travis Grant" has referred her like that. Both parts of the novel contains the same plot with both the Irish Girls, the Horses, the Stables and the "Tough Looking" men. It was more like a kindergarten story than a Historical Romance. Though I appreciate the writing st Want to know this book in a single word? that is "Boring." There is no humor, no adventure and most of all no villain. The story starts smoothly with "Adelia" or shall I say a "Child" because in the whole plot the male protagonist "Travis Grant" has referred her like that. Both parts of the novel contains the same plot with both the Irish Girls, the Horses, the Stables and the "Tough Looking" men. It was more like a kindergarten story than a Historical Romance. Though I appreciate the writing style of the author- minimized background details and more conversation- still it lacked in many points to grab a reader's attention.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Holly Boyd

    included Nora Roberts 1st book. enjoyed both books. each was really almost a novella, only about 180 pages long. both were centered around thoroughbred horse farms and included a trip to the Kentucky Derby. good, fun stories.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Taylor (BiblioTay)

    I really liked the first book. The second didnt book didnt really catch my attention till almost half way through it.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Robin Reynolds

    Having previously only read three or four of Nora Roberts' books, all of which were more recent books, it was interesting to go back to her beginnings. She has definitely grown in her writing skills. These two stories are fairly stereotypical of their times, what with the young innocent virginal heroines and the hardened arrogant demanding heroes. Not that I'm complaining, those types of heroes are still very much around and I very much love them. Adelia's story, Irish Thoroughbred, got a little Having previously only read three or four of Nora Roberts' books, all of which were more recent books, it was interesting to go back to her beginnings. She has definitely grown in her writing skills. These two stories are fairly stereotypical of their times, what with the young innocent virginal heroines and the hardened arrogant demanding heroes. Not that I'm complaining, those types of heroes are still very much around and I very much love them. Adelia's story, Irish Thoroughbred, got a little tiring at times as great pains seemed to be taken to constantly remind the reader (mostly via the way she spoke) that our heroine is from the backwaters of Ireland. But it was still an enjoyable story that kept me entertained. Erin, from Irish Rose, came from the same village as Adelia, but less emphasis was put on that aspect of her character, and I enjoyed her story even more. So much so that I sat up past my bedtime one night to finish the book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jenny

    In my continuing effort to break free of my reading slump, I tried some vintage Nora Roberts--a fluffy little story that I vaguely remember enjoying in the past. Well, it's still fluffy, and there's still a moderately-sized misunderstanding, and it was decidedly meh. Not terrible--I had no desire to throw it at the wall--but alas, it was not the book I was looking for. In my continuing effort to break free of my reading slump, I tried some vintage Nora Roberts--a fluffy little story that I vaguely remember enjoying in the past. Well, it's still fluffy, and there's still a moderately-sized misunderstanding, and it was decidedly meh. Not terrible--I had no desire to throw it at the wall--but alas, it was not the book I was looking for.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Jen

    I know that romance novels are all, to a point, formulaic. I know that the plot isn't the reason why one reads such books, but instead the books are read because they are character driven and the reader sees something of herself in the female protagonist. I generally enjoy books by Nora Roberts because she puts a lot of extra effort in to developing good, solid characters and a well described environment that teaches me something while at the same time remaining entertaining, but this compendium I know that romance novels are all, to a point, formulaic. I know that the plot isn't the reason why one reads such books, but instead the books are read because they are character driven and the reader sees something of herself in the female protagonist. I generally enjoy books by Nora Roberts because she puts a lot of extra effort in to developing good, solid characters and a well described environment that teaches me something while at the same time remaining entertaining, but this compendium (Irish Hearts (Irish Hearts #1 & 2)) merely ranked an "it was ok" because it had none of these aspects. Both of these are tales of rich men who own horse farms and the poor Irish women they end up marrying and then impregnating. If it weren't set in modern day, the formula found in these novels would be exactly that of a bodice-ripper where the tension in the plot is driven by a lack of communication between two individuals who are desperately in love with each other but don't bother to ever mention it due to their own insecurities. They even marry without ever having communicated on any but the most superficial of levels. Yawn. And the world of horse racing and horse breeding and horse farm ownership? Hardly discussed. One learns a bit about odds (a three to one shot means that you triple your money if the horse wins) and a bit about how to turn a foal in a breached birth, but other than that ... well ... had I not been a horse crazed gal when I was a wee one, I wouldn't know a paddock from an exercise ring even after reading two books set in the world of thoroughbred racing. This is not Nora Roberts's best writing, though given that these are the first two books she ever penned (or should it be "typed"?) I am glad that she matured into the style I enjoy so much.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Miss Kim

    I really enjoy Nora Roberts' stories connected to Ireland. This book contains her first novel, Irish Thoroughbred, and its sequel, Irish Rose. Irish Thoroughbred – Adelia Cunnane leaves Ireland for America to work on a horse farm with her uncle Paddy. She becomes a groom for the stable’s owner, Travis Grant. Uncle Paddy becomes ill and while ailing in the hospital he confesses that he wants to see them get together. Travis convinces Adelia that they should be married immediately to ‘help uncle Pa I really enjoy Nora Roberts' stories connected to Ireland. This book contains her first novel, Irish Thoroughbred, and its sequel, Irish Rose. Irish Thoroughbred – Adelia Cunnane leaves Ireland for America to work on a horse farm with her uncle Paddy. She becomes a groom for the stable’s owner, Travis Grant. Uncle Paddy becomes ill and while ailing in the hospital he confesses that he wants to see them get together. Travis convinces Adelia that they should be married immediately to ‘help uncle Paddy’. It’s a pretty simple romance with the two of them not really liking each other at first, but then falling for each other. I only had one irritation with the story. You are repeatedly reminded that Adelia is petite – 5’ 2”. Travis who is quite tall, is always patting her on the head like a child. I can’t imagine any one would like the head patting no matter how tall you are. I found it irritating. Irish Rose – I liked this story much more than the first. It takes place 7 years later, and features Adelia’s cousin, Erin McKinnon. Adelia, Grant, and their children go to Ireland to visit with family, and also bring along a business associate of Grant’s, Burke Logan. Mysterious Burke strikes a deal with Erin that she can work for him doing bookkeeping at his stable in America. She jumps at the offer and leaves family behind and leaves for America. They are both attracted to each other, and do not want to be. Add in a mystery, and you’ve got a wonderful read. I recommend to all Nora fans.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I love a story with a happy ending, and I have a friend who loves Nora Roberts. Well, actually, it seems like half the world must love Nora Roberts. I have heard that her character development is rich and that her stories are exciting. There are two complete books in this volume, and I'll just deal with the first one in this review. The character development went something like, "She's a spirited Irish lass who came from nothing. He's a rugged loner who grew up a poor little rich boy." Done. My I love a story with a happy ending, and I have a friend who loves Nora Roberts. Well, actually, it seems like half the world must love Nora Roberts. I have heard that her character development is rich and that her stories are exciting. There are two complete books in this volume, and I'll just deal with the first one in this review. The character development went something like, "She's a spirited Irish lass who came from nothing. He's a rugged loner who grew up a poor little rich boy." Done. My major problem with Irish Thoroughbreds, however, is this: There is a scene in which the hero rescues the heroine from the clutches of someone who is about to rape her. The hero then proceeds to physically dominate her throughout the rest of the novel. On several occasions, he aggressively kisses her into submission. And she enjoys it. This really bothers me on several levels.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Antoinette

    This is a two-novel book, and I only read the first one, "Irish Thoroughbred", apparently Nora Roberts's first novel. Good for a first novel! It feels very brief, though - perhaps in format she wrote was required. The heroine's Irish brogue is cute for several pages, and then feels a bit overdone. But the most interesting thing for me in this book is the hero! He's one-dimensional. He's also misogynistic in the way of the 80s, when manly strength wasn't far enough from manly control. This book c This is a two-novel book, and I only read the first one, "Irish Thoroughbred", apparently Nora Roberts's first novel. Good for a first novel! It feels very brief, though - perhaps in format she wrote was required. The heroine's Irish brogue is cute for several pages, and then feels a bit overdone. But the most interesting thing for me in this book is the hero! He's one-dimensional. He's also misogynistic in the way of the 80s, when manly strength wasn't far enough from manly control. This book couldn't have been written with this hero today, thank heavens. Sometimes it seems we haven't come very far at all, and then sometimes - just looking at the norms for masculinity as seen in this typical romance of the times - it seems we've at least begun to shift the paradigm.

  18. 4 out of 5

    AM Hazel

    I'd heard about Nora Roberts before I read these books. But I have to say that the hype didn't live up to the experience. I thought it was really strange that both of the main characters in this double book practically despised the men they ended up with. And even stranger that these men felt they had to trick or pressure the women into marriage. I also didn't like how in the first book Adelia was compared to a throughbred horse. As if she was just a thing to acquire for beauty or pleasure. The I'd heard about Nora Roberts before I read these books. But I have to say that the hype didn't live up to the experience. I thought it was really strange that both of the main characters in this double book practically despised the men they ended up with. And even stranger that these men felt they had to trick or pressure the women into marriage. I also didn't like how in the first book Adelia was compared to a throughbred horse. As if she was just a thing to acquire for beauty or pleasure. The writing is also very flat, boring & the plot was easy to predict. I was going to check out some of Roberts' other writing but I'm not sure if I will after reading these books.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Rochelle

    Irish Thoroughbred : 3.5 stars Irish Rose : 3 stars I just don't feel the romances were realistic in both novels, but especially in Irish Rose. Both marriages were rushed, and both men not admitting that they loved their wives until the end was annoying. Irish Thoroughbred : 3.5 stars Irish Rose : 3 stars I just don't feel the romances were realistic in both novels, but especially in Irish Rose. Both marriages were rushed, and both men not admitting that they loved their wives until the end was annoying.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sara

    I enjoyed the first book in the duo more than the second, but not enough that I'll read it again. Both were pretty rapey, with the first including an actual attempted rape. I had to really push myself to finish the book. It was full of comments like "I take what I want" and physical domination (not the "we're doing this because we both want to and have consented to it like adults" kind). The men are rich and domineering and the women are wholesome helpless virgins. There are infinitely better No I enjoyed the first book in the duo more than the second, but not enough that I'll read it again. Both were pretty rapey, with the first including an actual attempted rape. I had to really push myself to finish the book. It was full of comments like "I take what I want" and physical domination (not the "we're doing this because we both want to and have consented to it like adults" kind). The men are rich and domineering and the women are wholesome helpless virgins. There are infinitely better Nora Roberts novels, skip this one.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

    Awful. Just... terrible. 1.) When does this take place? The two heroines have never encountered a dishwasher? What? 2.) I hate the Heroes. 3.) How about some gradual romantic relationship development?

  22. 5 out of 5

    Betty

    I'm not usually into this type of romance but I'm on an "Irish kick" right now, so this intrigued me. Typical Norah Roberts romance with sexual overtones. Two stories about two Irish girls who both come to American and get involved in the American racetrack world. Very interesting. I'm not usually into this type of romance but I'm on an "Irish kick" right now, so this intrigued me. Typical Norah Roberts romance with sexual overtones. Two stories about two Irish girls who both come to American and get involved in the American racetrack world. Very interesting.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Leia

    I only rated this as low as I did because of the repeated romanticization of abusive traits or actions on the parts of the male love interests. However, the stories are engaging enough, even if the characters are very stereotypically and flatly written.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tania

    I normally love Nora Roberts but this was definitely not a favorite. I couldn't stand Irish Thoroughbred at all. She was way too "innocent and virginal" and Irish Rose was better but still I couldn't get behind these heroines and I didn't fall in love with either man the way I usually do. I normally love Nora Roberts but this was definitely not a favorite. I couldn't stand Irish Thoroughbred at all. She was way too "innocent and virginal" and Irish Rose was better but still I couldn't get behind these heroines and I didn't fall in love with either man the way I usually do.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Melissa Stull

    Awful! Both these novels make Irish women look incredibly vulnerable and stupid as well as desperate. I'm just reading the rest of the second novel because I started the book and I always finish a book no matter how awful and painful it is to read. Awful! Both these novels make Irish women look incredibly vulnerable and stupid as well as desperate. I'm just reading the rest of the second novel because I started the book and I always finish a book no matter how awful and painful it is to read.

  26. 5 out of 5

    J.W. Ellis

    06/2016 travis n dee r by far my favorite. all fire n passion. edges n bruises 08/2013

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Loved it!!!!! Very well written and my goal is to obtain the relationship Travis and Dee have.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jillian Brandon

    It’s been quite awhile since I read this, and some parts of it aged more gracefully than others. Despite that, I enjoyed the hell out of it.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Michaele Claves

    Sweet little romances but the characters were a bit one-sided. Enjoyed 'Irish Thoroughbred' more than 'Irish Rose'. Sweet little romances but the characters were a bit one-sided. Enjoyed 'Irish Thoroughbred' more than 'Irish Rose'.

  30. 5 out of 5

    D

    Both story lines were the same - arrogant man takes liberties with his position and forces himself on a young woman. I can't bring myself to read any more of the authors books. Both story lines were the same - arrogant man takes liberties with his position and forces himself on a young woman. I can't bring myself to read any more of the authors books.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...