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A Marvelous Work and a Wonder

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1950. Richards, a Presiding Bishop and Ordained One of the Twelve Apostles, offers an outline prepared to assist missionaries in their study and presentation of the gospel in a systematic and logical manner. Contents: The Position of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; The Visit of the Father and the Son; Personality of the Father and the Son; False Doctrines 1950. Richards, a Presiding Bishop and Ordained One of the Twelve Apostles, offers an outline prepared to assist missionaries in their study and presentation of the gospel in a systematic and logical manner. Contents: The Position of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; The Visit of the Father and the Son; Personality of the Father and the Son; False Doctrines and Universal Apostasy; A Marvelous Work and a Wonder to Come Forth; The Coming Forth of the Book of Mormon; The Book of Mormon Fulfills Bible Prophecies; Evidences of the Divinity of the Book of Mormon; Restoration of Priesthood Authority; The Ordinance of Baptism; The Mission of the Holy Ghost; Setting up the Kingdom of God Upon the Earth; The Mission of Elijah; Marriage for Time and for All Eternity; The Gathering of Israel; Israel in the Latter Days; The Coming of Elias; The True Church, A Missionary Church; Fundamental Differences Between Salvation and Exaltation; Whence Cometh Man?; Why Is Man Here?; Where Is Man Going?; The Sabbath Day; Predestination and Foreordination; The Word of Wisdom; The Law of Tithing; and By Their Fruits Ye Shall Know Them.


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1950. Richards, a Presiding Bishop and Ordained One of the Twelve Apostles, offers an outline prepared to assist missionaries in their study and presentation of the gospel in a systematic and logical manner. Contents: The Position of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; The Visit of the Father and the Son; Personality of the Father and the Son; False Doctrines 1950. Richards, a Presiding Bishop and Ordained One of the Twelve Apostles, offers an outline prepared to assist missionaries in their study and presentation of the gospel in a systematic and logical manner. Contents: The Position of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; The Visit of the Father and the Son; Personality of the Father and the Son; False Doctrines and Universal Apostasy; A Marvelous Work and a Wonder to Come Forth; The Coming Forth of the Book of Mormon; The Book of Mormon Fulfills Bible Prophecies; Evidences of the Divinity of the Book of Mormon; Restoration of Priesthood Authority; The Ordinance of Baptism; The Mission of the Holy Ghost; Setting up the Kingdom of God Upon the Earth; The Mission of Elijah; Marriage for Time and for All Eternity; The Gathering of Israel; Israel in the Latter Days; The Coming of Elias; The True Church, A Missionary Church; Fundamental Differences Between Salvation and Exaltation; Whence Cometh Man?; Why Is Man Here?; Where Is Man Going?; The Sabbath Day; Predestination and Foreordination; The Word of Wisdom; The Law of Tithing; and By Their Fruits Ye Shall Know Them.

30 review for A Marvelous Work and a Wonder

  1. 4 out of 5

    Eduardo

    This is an excellent book if you want to learn the basics of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. These people out there like to talk about planets, baptisms for the dead and magic underwear. Think of them like those who would write "Hebrew" on some business door so the Nazis could go and kill as many Jews as they wished, or those friars who would burn protestants on the stake for wanting to read the Bible, or protestants shooting Catholics in Ireland, and Muslims wanting to kill the This is an excellent book if you want to learn the basics of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. These people out there like to talk about planets, baptisms for the dead and magic underwear. Think of them like those who would write "Hebrew" on some business door so the Nazis could go and kill as many Jews as they wished, or those friars who would burn protestants on the stake for wanting to read the Bible, or protestants shooting Catholics in Ireland, and Muslims wanting to kill the infidels of the Western world. They are the same and want to make us look bad so we don't get elected to government and such. Well, in this book you will see that we are Christian and then, later you can read things within context and they will not look crazy. If you say that some people are taking a wafer thinking they are eating the actual flesh and drinking the actual blood of their God you will find them weird but within context that will not sound so bad. If you hear someone saying that God told his people to kill every man, woman, child and old, and even their animals if they stood in their way to a promise land, you will not want to get even close to that religion but you see that in the Bible and the Jews believe that as much as the Christians so. Out of context it all sounds bad. So, give people a chance, don't judge Jews, Catholics, Protestants, Mormons, anyone by what bigoted people from those same religions say about others. Read this book and give the Mormons a chance to tell you what they believe.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Barbara

    The first book I read after joining the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It really helped to clarify some of the things that had always caused me to wonder about religion. I've always been a believer of Jesus Christ but how His church became so many different churches believing such different doctrine puzzled me. The first book I read after joining the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. It really helped to clarify some of the things that had always caused me to wonder about religion. I've always been a believer of Jesus Christ but how His church became so many different churches believing such different doctrine puzzled me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Hans

    Don't get me wrong this isn't a bad book, I am more concerned with what the book is attempting to do. There is a natural tendency that all of us engage in called "Confirmation Bias" it is once we have accepted a certain opinion or view we seek hard to strengthen it by finding only those things that confirm our held view. It also makes us discredit or easily write off anything that challenges our view. This book is essentially that, a now outdated attempt at nothing but confirmation bias. I no lo Don't get me wrong this isn't a bad book, I am more concerned with what the book is attempting to do. There is a natural tendency that all of us engage in called "Confirmation Bias" it is once we have accepted a certain opinion or view we seek hard to strengthen it by finding only those things that confirm our held view. It also makes us discredit or easily write off anything that challenges our view. This book is essentially that, a now outdated attempt at nothing but confirmation bias. I no longer believe in the necessity of trying to prove faith. I think once anyone has undertaken to prove faith it is no longer faith, but a rational abstraction. A church's or a faith's power to build up lives is not based on if it is the only true church, like some winner of a philosophical competition, but its ability to change lives for the better. It shouldn't matter how true its foundation myths are, or if they are even factual. Nor should it be a competition of numbers to secure that bias, where the more people you have believing a certain view somehow confirms it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    I tried to read this book cover to cover like a novel, or biography. I began over a year ago, got about half way, put the book down for a while, then picked it back up and finished. This book would probably be better to use like a reference book. LeGrand Richards is an amazing man, and this book reflects his intellect and love for missionary work. Being written in book form in 1950, there are a few things "outdated" in this book. But, the gospel of Jesus Christ is eternal truth, and those truths I tried to read this book cover to cover like a novel, or biography. I began over a year ago, got about half way, put the book down for a while, then picked it back up and finished. This book would probably be better to use like a reference book. LeGrand Richards is an amazing man, and this book reflects his intellect and love for missionary work. Being written in book form in 1950, there are a few things "outdated" in this book. But, the gospel of Jesus Christ is eternal truth, and those truths written in this book are never "outdated". Elder LeGrand Richards wrote much of this while serving as the President of the Southern States Mission of The church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. At the conclusion of his mission in 1937, he left this material in outline form as a guide to assist the missionaries in their study and preparation for teaching people about the gospel. Because it was intended to be used as a reference to missionaries, there is some information that was duplicated in the various chapters. I really enjoyed reading the book, and learned more about a gospel that I have been living for many years. Some of my favorite chapters include: Evidences of the Divine Authenticity of the Book of Mormon, The Gathering of Israel, Why is Man Here?, and Predestination and Foreordination. I will keep this on my bookshelf and use it as a reference anytime I am teaching a lesson or giving a talk.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carol

    Elder LeGrand Richards was alive when I was in college, in his upper 90's. To hear him speak and his wisdom and sense of humor are treasures I will always remember. I specifically remember him speaking about enduring faithfully to the end, and that he prayed he would be able to do so. This book is one of the ground works of the LDS faith, that all newer members should read and grasp. I was a little older when I read it the first time, but it is a treasure in teaching fundamentals. Elder LeGrand Richards was alive when I was in college, in his upper 90's. To hear him speak and his wisdom and sense of humor are treasures I will always remember. I specifically remember him speaking about enduring faithfully to the end, and that he prayed he would be able to do so. This book is one of the ground works of the LDS faith, that all newer members should read and grasp. I was a little older when I read it the first time, but it is a treasure in teaching fundamentals.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Felix

    This is an extensive harmonization of the Standard Works of the LDS Church. What I mean by that is that this book is a harmonization of the Holy Bible, The Book of Mormon, The Doctrines and Covenants and The Pearl of Great Price. LeGrand Richards aims to systematically present the doctrine that emerges from all four texts together, moving through various topics from chapter to chapter. This book is perhaps at its most interesting in the middle third. Much of the earlier portion deals with matters This is an extensive harmonization of the Standard Works of the LDS Church. What I mean by that is that this book is a harmonization of the Holy Bible, The Book of Mormon, The Doctrines and Covenants and The Pearl of Great Price. LeGrand Richards aims to systematically present the doctrine that emerges from all four texts together, moving through various topics from chapter to chapter. This book is perhaps at its most interesting in the middle third. Much of the earlier portion deals with matters held in common with more mainstream Christian groups. The middle section tackles a number of more controversial and more radical questions. The final chapters are taken up with relatively briefly running through the various successes of the LDS movement, particularly in the State of Utah. This book used to be a part of the Missionary Reference Library (the collection of four books - besides the Standard Works - which missionaries are permitted to take with them on mission). It's been removed since, in favour of a much shorter work (Our Search for Happiness). It seems to me a strange choice, because A Marvelous Work and a Wonder is a remarkably systematic book. It deals with its topics comprehensively, and yet as briefly as is reasonably possible. Perhaps some areas could have done with updating (for example, I'm not sure how valuable various statistics about Utah in the 1940s would be to a modern missionary), but in general I think that much of it works just as well now as I imagine that it would have done when it was written. A Marvelous Work and a Wonder delves much deeper into LDS Theology than any casual (or non-LDS) reader is ordinarily going to be interested in learning about. Nevertheless, it does a great job at what it attempts to do. Harmonizing these texts is no small or easy feat. That LeGrand Richards did such a comprehensive job in only ~400 pages is very impressive.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Barbara Peters

    This is a great book for both the investigator and any member wanting a good outline of what it means to be a member of the church.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    I have and read the 1976 edition and first read the book in 1977 but have reread portions of it over the last 31 years. This is a great book for learning and sharing the basic truths of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. It provides very clear and concise pricipals of the Gospel. Very easy and enjoyable reading.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Larry

    This book made a difference in my testimony of the restoration of the gospel to the earth. LeGrand Richards explained the apostasy and restoration in such a logical and understandable way that left me convinced that Church has been restored to the earth with the proper priesthood, organization and ordinances.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bee

    When reviewing nonfiction books, I think it is important to rate based on research, execution, and accuracy rather than on subject matter. Let me explain why this book only gets one star from me. This book is not meant to be read in one sitting, or even in large chunks. Many of the chapters repeat themselves, but this is because many of the chapters cover similar materials. Here is an example of LeGrand's extremely biased sources. On page 406, we are told by LeGrand that "a writer for the New Yo When reviewing nonfiction books, I think it is important to rate based on research, execution, and accuracy rather than on subject matter. Let me explain why this book only gets one star from me. This book is not meant to be read in one sitting, or even in large chunks. Many of the chapters repeat themselves, but this is because many of the chapters cover similar materials. Here is an example of LeGrand's extremely biased sources. On page 406, we are told by LeGrand that "a writer for the New York Herald who had visited the Prophet Joseph Smith in 1842" wrote an article singing the praises of the Mormon church. For context, he presents this blurb as evidence that the world recognises mormon accomplishments. However, LeGrand puts the source after the quote....George Q. Cannon. And the quote is not in fact pulled from the New York Herald. It's pulled from "Life of Joseph Smith." This is deceptive for two reasons. First, LeGrand wanted readers to think the quote came from the New York Herald. Second, he wanted readers to think that Cannon was not Mormon. In fact, Cannon was a highly prolific Mormon that was "visiting" with Joe Smith in 1942 because he was already a convert. In many other cases throughout the book, LeGrand doesn't even give a name to go along with a quote. He will simply say something along the lines of "a visitor to SLC said" or "a writer." These types of anecdotes DO NOT count as credible sources. For all we know, these "quotes" are misremembered at best and made up at worst. It is clear that LeGrand was incredibly biased towards his subject. This is not a bad thing necessarily. But his sources are twisted to suit his narrative.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Charissa

    This is an in-depth treatise to the world on why the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the true restored Church of Jesus Christ. The author starts with the heavenly visitation of God the Father and Jesus Christ to Joseph Smith to usher in the restoration of all things prophesied by many ancient prophets. He discusses the apostasy that preceded this, the coming forth of the Book of Mormon, restoration of priesthood authority, sacred ordinances, the setting up of the kingdom of God, t This is an in-depth treatise to the world on why the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the true restored Church of Jesus Christ. The author starts with the heavenly visitation of God the Father and Jesus Christ to Joseph Smith to usher in the restoration of all things prophesied by many ancient prophets. He discusses the apostasy that preceded this, the coming forth of the Book of Mormon, restoration of priesthood authority, sacred ordinances, the setting up of the kingdom of God, the mission of Elijah in the latter-days, the eternal ordinance of marriage sealings, the gathering of Israel, missionary work, questions regarding where we came from, why we’re here, and where we are going after this life, Sabbath worship and other laws restored to the prophet Joseph Smith in our day. This restored gospel truly is a marvelous work and wonder, a gift from God. The author uses Bible scriptures and other references to prove these things. It’s a very well researched and laid out book that I enjoyed.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Anita

    I read this book to fulfil the goal "read a book your pastor recommends" being lds, we call our "pastors" bishops. i asked my bishop what he would recommend and this is what he told me. this book explains what we believe in why. i gave it a lower rating though because there are a lot of quotes in it, and i had a hard time staying awake because of its textbook style of reading. it is a great resourse though if you are trying to quickly find an answer about a single topic. I read this book to fulfil the goal "read a book your pastor recommends" being lds, we call our "pastors" bishops. i asked my bishop what he would recommend and this is what he told me. this book explains what we believe in why. i gave it a lower rating though because there are a lot of quotes in it, and i had a hard time staying awake because of its textbook style of reading. it is a great resourse though if you are trying to quickly find an answer about a single topic.

  13. 4 out of 5

    David Sylvester

    A fantastic book on the Restoration of the Church of Jesus Christ. This was the first book my father read as we investigated the Church in the early 1970's and was instrumental in our joining the Church! A fantastic book on the Restoration of the Church of Jesus Christ. This was the first book my father read as we investigated the Church in the early 1970's and was instrumental in our joining the Church!

  14. 5 out of 5

    NaDell

    Excellent source of information about The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints. I like that scriptures from the Old Testament, New Testament, and The Book of Mormon/ Doctrine and Covenants are all used to explain beliefs.

  15. 4 out of 5

    April

    Love this book! Being a life long member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, I wanted to read this book to possibly get more insight into certain doctrines and scriptural accounts along with my own scripture study. It definitely did that for me!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jefferson Coombs

    This book was part of my mission library. It is good book that clearly explains the restoration of the Gospel and its prophetic spread across the world.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mary Sasala

    A boring but comprehensive defense of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Karen

    Can't remember the date I finished it; was several months ago. Can't remember the date I finished it; was several months ago.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I think every member of the Church of Jesus Christ or anyone investigating the church should read this book. It breaks down the doctrines and organizes them in a way that is very compelling. There is a reason why this is/has been approved to be read by missionaries.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Stephen Greco

    This was a decent book that basically tried to prove The Book of Mormon and the restoration of the gospel is true with natural and historical evidence. Lots of good scripture references though. I would use this book more as a resource than anything else.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chelsey Ortega

    This was pretty good. It started out with a lot of basic stuff that I already knew, but with each chapter it got deeper. I was originally challenged to read it when I was a teenager, but I never finished it. I'm glad I waited until I was an adult to read it from cover to cover, there was a lot of stuff I wouldn't have understood as a teenager. If you are knew to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, I would recommend reading Our Heritage and Gospel Principles before reading this. But This was pretty good. It started out with a lot of basic stuff that I already knew, but with each chapter it got deeper. I was originally challenged to read it when I was a teenager, but I never finished it. I'm glad I waited until I was an adult to read it from cover to cover, there was a lot of stuff I wouldn't have understood as a teenager. If you are knew to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, I would recommend reading Our Heritage and Gospel Principles before reading this. But all three of those are a good read.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Samuel

    A MARVELOUS WORK AND A WONDER is a classic mid-twentieth century text that has near-canonical status in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. LeGrand Richards originally wrote most of it as a mission president for his missionaries to better understand and teach the unique aspects of the Mormon Church history and doctrine. He repeatedly states that the Mormon Church was not created by reading and interpreting the Bible like the Protestant denominations, but rather, the Church's organiz A MARVELOUS WORK AND A WONDER is a classic mid-twentieth century text that has near-canonical status in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. LeGrand Richards originally wrote most of it as a mission president for his missionaries to better understand and teach the unique aspects of the Mormon Church history and doctrine. He repeatedly states that the Mormon Church was not created by reading and interpreting the Bible like the Protestant denominations, but rather, the Church's organization and doctrine came "directly" from God to the earth through living, contemporary prophets (mainly Joseph Smith) that communed with Him, His son Jesus, and other angelic messengers that He sent to earth. Only after reiterating this point, does Richards go on to explain/interpret scriptures that can be understood to support Mormon doctrine. In other words, whereas other churches have men interpreting the same passages of scripture in diverse ways that have lead to hundreds of denominational factions, the Mormon Church claims to have received one, united interpretation and understanding for how to worship and follow the LORD of the Bible. While this thesis is indeed what Mormons believe, it is interesting to see how the tone and diction tends to make it seem as though there is no possible way to mis-interpret or understand differently the scriptural interpretations held by the Mormon Church. While I personally agree with Church interpretations of the Bible as harmonizing with latter-day scripture, it seems like the argumentation sometimes seems to assume that accepting the one true way is inevitable and clear-cut. I think it requires a little more intellectual liberation by individuals to come to this knowledge than suggested here, but understanding that the audience is believers or sincere investigators (people leaning towards believing) his tone and diction is appropriate. Otherwise, a skeptic would be left wanting for more of the alternate interpretations offered by other denominations to satisfy curiosity). The content weaves large passages of scripture from the Bible, Book of Mormon, Doctrine and Covenants, and the Pearl of Great Price as well as anecdotal stories and studies in with his commentary. Most of the chapter organization sections make clear sense and follow a logical path. It is a fairly simple and enjoyable read but it seams like other writings such as Elder Ballard's OUR SEARCH FOR HAPPINESS accomplishes a similar ends in fewer words and clearer paths. Nevertheless, this book is significant in being an early attempt to rather comprehensively explain the Mormon Church and its rather impressive, extensive doctrine. This book's influence can be seen in Mormon culture and Mormon writing from Conference talks to PREACH MY GOSPEL (the Church's present missionary manual and program).

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Bold! Originally written as a summary of beliefs and doctrines of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS Church), A Marvelous Work and a Wonder is more of an apoloiga. It dissects doctrine and opposing viewpoints using the scriptures (Bible, Book of Mormon, Doctrine and Covenants, & Pearl of Great Price) as well as quotations of learned men and scientific studies. The scientific studies are a little outdated, so I'd like to see updated figures for today, but that's just the scienti Bold! Originally written as a summary of beliefs and doctrines of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (LDS Church), A Marvelous Work and a Wonder is more of an apoloiga. It dissects doctrine and opposing viewpoints using the scriptures (Bible, Book of Mormon, Doctrine and Covenants, & Pearl of Great Price) as well as quotations of learned men and scientific studies. The scientific studies are a little outdated, so I'd like to see updated figures for today, but that's just the scientist in me coming out. I originally read the book as a young missionary in Florida, but I still found it to be enlightening and illuminating 10 years later. I said it was bold, it's also unapologetic and uncompromisingly straightforward. No sugar coating here. Some might find it a little heavy-handed. For those investigating the LDS Church, I suggest first reading the Book of Mormon and testing its promise (Moroni 10:3-5) and bringing your questions and concerns to the missionaries. A Marvelous Work and a Wonder is a little dated and doesn't address some current social issues, but it is a useful reference because it is exhaustively cross-referenced with the scriptures.

  24. 4 out of 5

    James Carroll

    I would guess that whenever you give a review this bad to a book by a general authority of the Church, some explanation is needed. As much as I love Elder Richards, that doesn't mean that his book is great. So, what's wrong with it? The book never suggests bible-bashing, and in fact says that bible bashing is a bad idea, but in my experience, the effect of this book on missionaries is nevertheless to encourage debate and bible-bashing.That is not a good way to teach the gospel. Worse, although th I would guess that whenever you give a review this bad to a book by a general authority of the Church, some explanation is needed. As much as I love Elder Richards, that doesn't mean that his book is great. So, what's wrong with it? The book never suggests bible-bashing, and in fact says that bible bashing is a bad idea, but in my experience, the effect of this book on missionaries is nevertheless to encourage debate and bible-bashing.That is not a good way to teach the gospel. Worse, although the doctrine contained in the book is invariably true, the book tends to see that doctrine in the Bible in places where it doesn't really exist. Thus the book often drastically mis-interprets the Bible in order to see LDS doctrine in it. Although the doctrine is true, it isn't always in the Bible in all the places we sometimes think that it is. So when missionaries argue about the doctrine from this book, first, they shouldn't be arguing at all, and worse, when they do argue, they are wrong more often than not. Missionaries especially should stay away from this book.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    This is Mormonism 101. I read it for a very good Mormon friend when we where working together at Payless. He recommended it as a means of getting a good overview of what Mormons believe. It was more of a missionary book and of course set out to convince its readers that Mormonism makes sense philosophically and biblically. The book failed to convince me, obviously and I found myself more often provoked than challenged by the author's strange reasoning and tendency to use clinchers like "How can This is Mormonism 101. I read it for a very good Mormon friend when we where working together at Payless. He recommended it as a means of getting a good overview of what Mormons believe. It was more of a missionary book and of course set out to convince its readers that Mormonism makes sense philosophically and biblically. The book failed to convince me, obviously and I found myself more often provoked than challenged by the author's strange reasoning and tendency to use clinchers like "How can it be more clear that [blah, blah:] is the most certain truth of God?" and "How can anyone deny the clear meaning in [what ever:] text?" These statements were used when logic and reasoning and sound exegesis was lacking. These statements were used often. If you have sound arguments and reasoning, such statements are a waste of paper.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Reading "A Marvelous Work and a Wonder" was a good refresher course on the basics of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. I feel like it will be beneficial to me in my future missionary opportunities. Knowledge is power :) It was not an easy book to get through... It felt sometimes a little like sitting through a gospel doctrine lesson read straight from the manual. It's also a little outdated in it's delivery... It's more of a "This is why we are right, and other churches are obviou Reading "A Marvelous Work and a Wonder" was a good refresher course on the basics of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. I feel like it will be beneficial to me in my future missionary opportunities. Knowledge is power :) It was not an easy book to get through... It felt sometimes a little like sitting through a gospel doctrine lesson read straight from the manual. It's also a little outdated in it's delivery... It's more of a "This is why we are right, and other churches are obviously wrong" format, whereas more recent missionary tools such as Preach My Gospel (which I love!) encourage dialogue that promotes finding similarities and common ground as a basis for inviting the spirit to teach. That being said, I still highly recommend this book, and will definitely reference it when opportunities arise to teach gospel principles.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    A bit repetitive, but you're forewarned about that at the outset, since this book is a compilation of pamphlets and not a book in the traditional sense. There are definitely some terms that started to grind on me, but that's just because of my upbringing. I have always preferred "LDS" over "Mormon," since I have never felt that "Mormon" is accurate, but is a term used by those who don't know any better. Also Richards mentions the "pre-existence," which has long since been replaced with "pre-mort A bit repetitive, but you're forewarned about that at the outset, since this book is a compilation of pamphlets and not a book in the traditional sense. There are definitely some terms that started to grind on me, but that's just because of my upbringing. I have always preferred "LDS" over "Mormon," since I have never felt that "Mormon" is accurate, but is a term used by those who don't know any better. Also Richards mentions the "pre-existence," which has long since been replaced with "pre-mortal life" for obvious reasons. My favorite part was the story of Tolstoy in the summary. All in all, it's not light reading, but it's not complicated either - very simple and straightforward. A great overview of the LDS faith for members and non-members alike.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Colleen

    I asked my grandpa a year or two ago what made him join the LDS church. He said he happened to find this book in his library, sat down and read it, and never looked back. He quit drinking, quit smoking, invited the missionaries into his home, and he and the rest of the family was baptized. Written in 1950, it is a bit dated, but the doctrines and beliefs it covers haven't changed. It is a great chronicle of the basic history of the church and of the doctrine of the LDS faith. If I weren't alread I asked my grandpa a year or two ago what made him join the LDS church. He said he happened to find this book in his library, sat down and read it, and never looked back. He quit drinking, quit smoking, invited the missionaries into his home, and he and the rest of the family was baptized. Written in 1950, it is a bit dated, but the doctrines and beliefs it covers haven't changed. It is a great chronicle of the basic history of the church and of the doctrine of the LDS faith. If I weren't already a believer, I would definitely feel like I needed to do some serious soul-searching after reading this book. As it is, I enjoyed reviewing our beliefs and the connections we have to Christ's church while he lived on the earth. Not a quick read, but definitely a worthwhile one.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Audrey

    This was written in the early 70s as sort of the first missionary manual. It's mainly aimed at Christians who are very familiar with the Bible. It covers the history of the Restoration and logically presents the case for the need of a Restoration. It's a pretty academic writing style -- a bit dry but typical of the time. It's a bit dated as far as statistics and things like stake seventies go. I also think missionaries today meet more people who haven't had any experiences with God rather than th This was written in the early 70s as sort of the first missionary manual. It's mainly aimed at Christians who are very familiar with the Bible. It covers the history of the Restoration and logically presents the case for the need of a Restoration. It's a pretty academic writing style -- a bit dry but typical of the time. It's a bit dated as far as statistics and things like stake seventies go. I also think missionaries today meet more people who haven't had any experiences with God rather than those already familiar with Christian doctrines. I'd recommend this for new church members, those preparing to be missionaries, or anyone interested in theology in general.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    This was the text that was used by me when I taught Sunday School out at the Utah State prison. I taught there for three years. It was wonderful. My students were sex offenders and addicts for the most part with the occasional murder thrown in. These people were hungry for the gospel and it was a wonderful experience. We went through the entire book and started again. I think some days we spent the entire hour on maybe one page. I love this book. And not just because of its content, but because This was the text that was used by me when I taught Sunday School out at the Utah State prison. I taught there for three years. It was wonderful. My students were sex offenders and addicts for the most part with the occasional murder thrown in. These people were hungry for the gospel and it was a wonderful experience. We went through the entire book and started again. I think some days we spent the entire hour on maybe one page. I love this book. And not just because of its content, but because of the experience with the Spirit that I had on each page with these men who wanted so badly to turn their lives around.

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