website statistics Surrealist Poetry in English - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Surrealist Poetry in English

Availability: Ready to download

The surrealist movement was founded in France in 1924, brother of the anarchist Dada, heir of experiments in 19th century literature. In England, the movement arose as the logical evolution of 19th century literature's dominant concern - the psychopathology of the artist's mind. Being unconcerned with conventional morality, it had few affinities with the humanist tradition The surrealist movement was founded in France in 1924, brother of the anarchist Dada, heir of experiments in 19th century literature. In England, the movement arose as the logical evolution of 19th century literature's dominant concern - the psychopathology of the artist's mind. Being unconcerned with conventional morality, it had few affinities with the humanist tradition of literature and saw the classical tradition as antithetical to literature altogether. This book examines surrealist poetry in English literature.


Compare

The surrealist movement was founded in France in 1924, brother of the anarchist Dada, heir of experiments in 19th century literature. In England, the movement arose as the logical evolution of 19th century literature's dominant concern - the psychopathology of the artist's mind. Being unconcerned with conventional morality, it had few affinities with the humanist tradition The surrealist movement was founded in France in 1924, brother of the anarchist Dada, heir of experiments in 19th century literature. In England, the movement arose as the logical evolution of 19th century literature's dominant concern - the psychopathology of the artist's mind. Being unconcerned with conventional morality, it had few affinities with the humanist tradition of literature and saw the classical tradition as antithetical to literature altogether. This book examines surrealist poetry in English literature.

30 review for Surrealist Poetry in English

  1. 5 out of 5

    mwpm mwpm

    Surrealism, as we know it, emerged from the movement founded in France circa 1924 by Andre Breton. The influence of Tristan Tzara's Dada, to which Breton was briefly affiliated, has been widely acknowledged. Initially considered a literary movement, Surrealism has since become more commonly associated with painting (specifically the paintings of Salvador Dali, who caused a stir when he claimed: "I am Surrealism"). Likewise, Surrealism is commonly associated with the French. Though few English-la Surrealism, as we know it, emerged from the movement founded in France circa 1924 by Andre Breton. The influence of Tristan Tzara's Dada, to which Breton was briefly affiliated, has been widely acknowledged. Initially considered a literary movement, Surrealism has since become more commonly associated with painting (specifically the paintings of Salvador Dali, who caused a stir when he claimed: "I am Surrealism"). Likewise, Surrealism is commonly associated with the French. Though few English-language poets are exclusively surrealist, this selection demonstrates the range of Surrealism's literary impact. From David Gascoyne, one of the earliest and most dedicated British advocates of surrealists, and Kenneth Patchen, the closest American counterpart with regards to his political and transcendental concerns, to numerous other poets who directly incorporated or were indirectly influenced by Surrealism, including: A.J.M. Smith, Ruthven Todd, Charles Madge, Djuna Barnes, Dylan Thomas, Charles Henri Ford, Thomas Merton, Weldon Kees, Frank O'Hara, Robert Duncan, Kenneth Koch, John Ashbery, H.R. Hays, Robert Bly, George Hitchcock, Donald Hall, Bill Knott, Ted Berrigan, Ron Padgett, Tom Clark, James Tate, Mark Strand, Robin Magowan, John Haines, Andrei Codrescu, W.S. Merwin, and Michael McClure (among others)... A.J.M. Smith... Nobody said Apples for nearly a minute - I thought I should die. Finally, though, the second sardine from the end, on the left, converted a try. (It brought down the house. The noise was terrific. I dropped my glass eye.) Meanwhile Mr Baldwin managed to make himself heard. He looks sad but with characteristic aplomb said keep calm there is no cause for alarm. Two soldiers' crutches had sexual intercourse on the spot with a little bit of fluff from a lint bandage in the firing chamber of a 12 inch gun. People agreed not to notice. The band played a little bit louder. It was all very British. - Political Intelligence, pg. 89 David Gascoyne... Yes you have said enough for the time being There will be plenty of lace later on Plenty of electric wool And you will forget the eglantine Growing around the edge of the green lake And if you forget the colour of my hands You will remember the wheels of the chair In which the wax figure resembling you sat Several men are standing on the pier Unloading the sea The device on the trolly says MOTHER'S MEAT Which means Until the end. - The End is Near the Beginning, pg. 109 Charles Madge... The character of a landscape stand always in a mysterious relation to the soul of man. And while he thought thus and lay on skins on the ground, the jaguars swam through the stream, and played round his resting-place. The instruments had to share the couch of the travellers at night. And gave science an insight into the analogy of natural formations, and the ruling laws of the globe in reference to its veins of water. - Landscape I, pg. 138 Kenneth Patchen... A beast stands at my eye. I cook my senses in a dark fire. The old wombs rot and the new mother Approaches with the footsteps of a world. Who are the people of this unscaled heaven? What beckons? Whose blood hallows this grim land? What slithers along the watershed of my human sleep? The other side of knowing... Caress of unwaking delight...O start A sufficient love! O gently silent forms Of the last spaces. - The Naked Land, pg. 175 Frank O'Hara... The eager note on my door said 'Call me, call when you get in!' so I quickly threw a few tangerines into my overnight bag, straightened my eyelids and shoulders, and headed straight for the door. It was autumn by the time I got around the corner, oh all unwilling to be either pertinent or bemused, but the leaves were brighter than grass on the sidewalk! Funny, I thought, that the lights are on this late and the hall door open; still up at this hour, a champion jai-alai player like himself? Oh fie! for shame! What a host, so zealous! And he was there in the hall, flat on a sheet of blood that ran down the stairs. I did appreciate it. There are few hosts who so thoroughly prepare to greet a guest only casually invited, and that several months ago. - Poem, pg. 205 Robert Duncan... The eye opening is a mouth seeing, an organ of sight gasping for air. Love in the eye corrupts the seed stirring new freaks of vision there. How wonderful in the new sight the world will appear! The mouth speaking is a heart breathing The blood itself has seen something. The world worm changing, coiled in his pit, is the ripeness of the fruit, the organ of sight. How wonderful in the new eye the world will appear! - Eyesight II, pg. 211 Donald Hall... It has happened suddenly, by surprise, in an arbor, or while drinking good coffee, after speaking, or before, that I dumbly inhabit a density; in language, there is nothing to stop it, for nothing retains an edge. Simple ignorance presents, later, words for a function, but it is common pretense of speech, by a convention, and there is nothing at all but inner silence, nothing to relieve on principle now this intense thickening. - Je suis une table, pg. 246 Bill Knott... If you are still alive when you read this, close you eyes. I am under their lids, growing black. - Goodbye, pg. 262 Robin Magowan... An old man gets up turns As in the quiet darkness of his own empty Hen scuttled field He is breaking it Field goats family stone-cropped house Takes steps on makes with his hands his white Fuse of a cigarette crackle sing In the ash of his glass dancing His past round whiteness over which he stops Hops twice jumps A needle of browns Blacks Occasionally lizard Flash of a whip salt bright Falling. - Zeimbekiko, pg. 304 John Haines... Soundlessly, a tide at the ear of the sleeper, a wave is breaking on an inner shore. Barriers crumble in the chest, the arteries surge full and subside, and flood again... And behind the eyelids, a sun struggling to rise, throwing its light far inland where a man neither living nor dying shifts in his soiled flesh and remembers... - Awakening, pg. 309

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I found this in a used book shop and since I love French surrealist poetry I thought I’d have a look at an anthology collecting examples of what English speakers have done with it. I have to say the book starts out pretty choppy with some poets just winging it completely with little positive outcome. If you’ve ever read Benjamin Peret, the Belgian surrealist, the surrealist of all surrealists, you’d see where some of these imitations came from. It doesn’t work. Oddly enough, the book also con I found this in a used book shop and since I love French surrealist poetry I thought I’d have a look at an anthology collecting examples of what English speakers have done with it. I have to say the book starts out pretty choppy with some poets just winging it completely with little positive outcome. If you’ve ever read Benjamin Peret, the Belgian surrealist, the surrealist of all surrealists, you’d see where some of these imitations came from. It doesn’t work. Oddly enough, the book also contains many translations of surrealist poetry into English, and how that qualifies as English surrealism you got me. Still, things improved as the book went on, though I find it hard to classify a lot of the work in here as strictly surrealist, and who cares. Among the contemporary poets included are W.S. Merwin, John Ashbery, Frank O’Hara, Kenneth Patchen and James Tate. Yes, the volume is overwhelmed by men and I guess there are few female surrealists, or even non-surrealists who have written a surrealist poem that anyone has read. But enough quibbling. I enjoyed this a lot, even some of the crappy parts were so crappy they made me laugh. And there was also some excellent stuff in there, like the short short poems of Bill Knott, and Ken Smith’s poem “Train.” (here: http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/train-2/) Death by Bill Knott Going to sleep, I cross my hands on my chest. They will place my hands like this. It will look as if I am flying into myself.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tracy

    I bought this book in Toronto, Canada when I was 16 or 17. It's truly fascinating. I had never read poetry like it before, never even knew poetry could be surrealist, and found many of the poems brought me inspiration for my own work. Have many, many, many favorite poems from this book. I haven't read it cover to cover, but I think I've read most of them. I bought this book in Toronto, Canada when I was 16 or 17. It's truly fascinating. I had never read poetry like it before, never even knew poetry could be surrealist, and found many of the poems brought me inspiration for my own work. Have many, many, many favorite poems from this book. I haven't read it cover to cover, but I think I've read most of them.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jordan West

    Five stars for the work of David Gascoyne, Hugh Sykes Davies and other actual surrealists, less so for the rest.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Quinn

    read this book in high school and it changed the way i write.

  6. 5 out of 5

    David

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mark Noack

  8. 5 out of 5

    Adrian

  9. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

  10. 4 out of 5

    karen

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alyssa

  12. 4 out of 5

    Jay Woodman

  13. 4 out of 5

    Leon Cych

  14. 5 out of 5

    Nate

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jeff Downer

  16. 5 out of 5

    James Andrew

  17. 5 out of 5

    Corin

  18. 4 out of 5

    Karl Hickey

  19. 5 out of 5

    Peter King

  20. 4 out of 5

    Montana

  21. 5 out of 5

    Nasim

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  24. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Ballin

  25. 4 out of 5

    Tyrone

  26. 4 out of 5

    Damon

  27. 4 out of 5

    Louis

  28. 4 out of 5

    snakesong

  29. 5 out of 5

    W.B.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Dale Houstman

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.