website statistics Faithful Antiracism: Moving Past Talk to Systemic Change - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Faithful Antiracism: Moving Past Talk to Systemic Change

Availability: Ready to download

It's time to move past talk. It's no longer news to most of us that our society has a deep-seated racism problem. Christians of all ethnic and economic backgrounds are tired of seeing the ugly legacy of racism play out before their eyes and feeling ill-equipped to respond. They watch as friends and family members leave the visible church over this issue, or fall prey to a It's time to move past talk. It's no longer news to most of us that our society has a deep-seated racism problem. Christians of all ethnic and economic backgrounds are tired of seeing the ugly legacy of racism play out before their eyes and feeling ill-equipped to respond. They watch as friends and family members leave the visible church over this issue, or fall prey to a gospel of White nationalism that is an affront to the cross of Christ. Racism presents itself as an undefeatable foe--a sustained scourge on the reputation of the church. In Faithful Antiracism, Christina Barland Edmondson and Chad Brennan take confidence from the truth that Christ has overcome the world, including racism, and offer clear analysis and interventions to challenge and resist its pernicious power. Drawing on brand-new research from the landmark Race, Religion, and Justice Project led by Michael Emerson and others, this book represents the most comprehensive study on Christians and race since Emerson's own book Divided by Faith (2001). It invites readers to put this data to immediate practical use, applying it to their own specific context. Compelled by our grievous social moment and by the timeless truth of Scripture, Faithful Antiracism will equip readers to move past talk and enter the fight against racism in both practical and hopeful ways.


Compare

It's time to move past talk. It's no longer news to most of us that our society has a deep-seated racism problem. Christians of all ethnic and economic backgrounds are tired of seeing the ugly legacy of racism play out before their eyes and feeling ill-equipped to respond. They watch as friends and family members leave the visible church over this issue, or fall prey to a It's time to move past talk. It's no longer news to most of us that our society has a deep-seated racism problem. Christians of all ethnic and economic backgrounds are tired of seeing the ugly legacy of racism play out before their eyes and feeling ill-equipped to respond. They watch as friends and family members leave the visible church over this issue, or fall prey to a gospel of White nationalism that is an affront to the cross of Christ. Racism presents itself as an undefeatable foe--a sustained scourge on the reputation of the church. In Faithful Antiracism, Christina Barland Edmondson and Chad Brennan take confidence from the truth that Christ has overcome the world, including racism, and offer clear analysis and interventions to challenge and resist its pernicious power. Drawing on brand-new research from the landmark Race, Religion, and Justice Project led by Michael Emerson and others, this book represents the most comprehensive study on Christians and race since Emerson's own book Divided by Faith (2001). It invites readers to put this data to immediate practical use, applying it to their own specific context. Compelled by our grievous social moment and by the timeless truth of Scripture, Faithful Antiracism will equip readers to move past talk and enter the fight against racism in both practical and hopeful ways.

30 review for Faithful Antiracism: Moving Past Talk to Systemic Change

  1. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Summary: Drawing upon the Race, Religion, and Justice Project, offers biblical and practical recommendations to engage racism personally and with one’s faith community. The resurgence of white supremacy movements, police-involved shootings or other measures resulting in the deaths of a disproportionate number of Blacks, and efforts to suppress the history of slavery and racism in our country is, to be frank, discouraging. With the election of the first Black president, many of us had hopes that w Summary: Drawing upon the Race, Religion, and Justice Project, offers biblical and practical recommendations to engage racism personally and with one’s faith community. The resurgence of white supremacy movements, police-involved shootings or other measures resulting in the deaths of a disproportionate number of Blacks, and efforts to suppress the history of slavery and racism in our country is, to be frank, discouraging. With the election of the first Black president, many of us had hopes that we had turned a corner in our racial history. This book is one both of realism, rooted in the recent research findings of the Race, Religion, and Justice Project, and hope, rooted in the scriptures and the God in whom we trust. Indeed, the title, Faithful Antiracism, is a ringing challenge both to trust God and keep showing up to work against the forces that sustain racism. The authors both come from long experiences of working with churches and other organizations in developing policies and practices fostering greater racial equity in their midst and greater effectiveness in addressing racism in society. Chad directed the Race, Religion, and Justice Project that studied the racial dynamics in U.S. Christianity, interviewing 115 leaders and experts, and involving 119 congregations with 3260 congregants. They also use research from Renew Partnerships Campus Climate Survey and Barna Research. The first chapter of the group shares some of their research findings. It turns out that Christians often have less accurate racial views and are less motivated to address racial injustice. They attribute this to a “cultural toolkit” that emphasizes accountable freewill individualism, relationalism, and antistructuralism that hinder recognizing societal and economic differences, and embedded structures that account for disparities in things such as household wealth by race. They then turn to scripture showing the structures of racial hostility evident in Ephesians 2 and the significance of the work of Christ in bringing both peace and justice. They survey the concerns of the prophets regarding the unjust structures in Israelite society that oppressed the poor. They note that while Christians attest to being committed to scripture, this is often qualified by the talking points of political culture which takes precedence. They elaborate a variety of principles that apply to racial justice from denunciations of greed, to making things right when we’ve benefited from unjust racial hierarchies. They then turn to biblical and historical figures who stood for justice. They also emphasize how understanding the past is critical if we are to understand the pain of those who lived through these realities or bear the traumas of parents and grandparents who suffered them. They offer an outline of that history. They turn to the importance of understanding the present as well, pointing out key events from the 1960’s to the present, the forms of opposition, the superficial support that often covers this, and the ways political allegiance have taken precedence over biblical teaching. One of the most trenchant observations was the strategy of “label, mischaracterize, dismiss” to oppose pursuit of racial justice, calling actions of people of goodwill “a movement” (labelling), describing it as Marxist or Socialist when it is motivated by biblical concerns (mischaracterizing), and warning people to avoid such stuff (dismiss). Often superficial efforts have focused around the “magic” of relationships, helping people become Christians, of “colorblindness, “of being welcoming, or even being “woke.” Often, these obscure deeper issues both in our own lives and in the organizational structures of our churches and other organizations. Rather, we ought take a page from a study of Acts, as the church overcame racial barriers. We also need mentors and solidarity with others beyond our own groups and should seek out coaches as we engage this work. We learn to measure change with substantive rather than superficial measures. And we learn both how to partner with those facing injustice and use our presence and economic and political resources to withdraw support from those acting unjustly. As I mentioned at the beginning, this is a hopeful, though grittily realistic book. It grounds our efforts to stand against racial injustice in scripture while refusing superficial window dressing. But it also names practical steps individuals and groups can take. This is a handbook churches can use, with discussion questions and prayer that help bring truths before God for his illumination, leading to actions of substance instead of a world of talk. ____________________________ Disclosure of Material Connection: I received a complimentary review copy of this book from the publisher in exchange for an honest review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

  2. 4 out of 5

    AJ Gebara

    Absolutely great! I have read Ibram Kendi’s How to be Antiracists, and I loved it also but ultimately it is not from a Christian perspective. Faithful Antiracism presents many of the same ideas but through a Biblical worldview. It uses data-driven, both quantitative and qualitative, and Biblical analyses and solutions to racial injustice and ultimately shows that Christians not only need to be part of the conversation but must lead in the efforts to confront the racism embedded in our systems an Absolutely great! I have read Ibram Kendi’s How to be Antiracists, and I loved it also but ultimately it is not from a Christian perspective. Faithful Antiracism presents many of the same ideas but through a Biblical worldview. It uses data-driven, both quantitative and qualitative, and Biblical analyses and solutions to racial injustice and ultimately shows that Christians not only need to be part of the conversation but must lead in the efforts to confront the racism embedded in our systems and change them to bring a more equitable future. This is grounded in both the messages of the prophets, especially Amos, the early disciples in Acts, and most importantly Jesus! I humbly encourage anyone who doesn’t know where to start in the race conversation or who doesn’t know much about it to read this book.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Hoss

    Faithful Antiracism is a book that is written for people who see past and present systemic racism and ask, "well what can I do about this?" Built on the premise of research done by Chad Brennan and Dr. Christina Edmonson from 2019 to 2020 (called the Race, Religion, and Justice Project, or RRJP for short) and how scripture addresses the way we should engage with racial justice, Mr. Brennan and Dr. Edmonson equip their readers with practical steps towards having a more racially inclusive church e Faithful Antiracism is a book that is written for people who see past and present systemic racism and ask, "well what can I do about this?" Built on the premise of research done by Chad Brennan and Dr. Christina Edmonson from 2019 to 2020 (called the Race, Religion, and Justice Project, or RRJP for short) and how scripture addresses the way we should engage with racial justice, Mr. Brennan and Dr. Edmonson equip their readers with practical steps towards having a more racially inclusive church environment and lifestyle. On pages 2 and 3, the authors define faithful racism as: "We are using two senses of the term faithful. First, faithful describes someone who is trustworthy and loyal: faithful antiracists are steadfastly committed to working towards antiracism. Second, faithful antiracists are full of faith or faith-full. We believe it is essential to rely on God's power and leading in order to make progress. As Jesus said, "I am the vine, you are the branches. If you remain in me and I in you, you will bear much fruit; apart from me, you can do nothing" (John 15:5). By racism, we mean race-based discrimination and social hierarchies where individuals receive advantages or disadvantages because of perceived racial differences. If you find that sentence confusing, hang in there. We will explain what we mean by these concepts. By antiracism, we mean working against the forces that sustain racism." From there, the authors tell their stories of how they've been affected by racism and race in general and what lead to them writing this book and explain their research. The research was particularly noteworthy to me and I would have loved to see more information on the research, but I understand that having more of that would also make the book significantly less accessible for the general public to read. They also made it clear that they weren't able to include the views of biracial/mixed (they use multiracial, but as someone that is biracial/mixed, that's generally not the term I choose to use for myself) people or Indigenous people because their sample size didn't have a significant number of people in either group, so they couldn't make accurate statements about the views of each group. As I understand it, the book was in the process of being written before the US census information had been released, so the authors may not be aware that racially mixed Americans now make up about 8.8% of the population. While I understand why our voices were not heard in the research, it is unfortunate nonetheless. The first 5 chapters outline what it looks like to be an antiracist further, by looking at how an antiracist should have wisdom, read and apply scripture, stand for justice, understand the past, and understand the present. At chapter 6, the book turns to look at racial trauma, which was one of the most helpful chapters to read and it was very compelling. I highlighted many parts of the text because not only did it highlight so much of Dr. Edmonson's expertise and passion, but it also resonated strongly with me while pointing to God's care for his children and his heart for justice in these situations. After chapter 6, the book primarily looks at solid action points that Christians can take to work towards racial justice. One of the most important things to me was how much Dr. Edmonson and Mr. Brennan emphasized that this is not easy work, it will take time, and it will be uncomfortable. Yet, it is also worthwhile and should be done. While I appreciate many of the action points given and agree with a lot of the diagnosed issues given, I don't know if I am fully on board with some of the proposed solutions. Additionally, parts of the book were hard to read, not because I couldn't understand them or was disinterested, it was just a writing style that doesn't necessarily appeal to me. That said, I do recommend this book as a way to grow and give food for thought. I'd recommend reading it in the context of a group, especially if you are in ministry, so that you can discuss together ways to implement some of the suggestions given.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Lagerwey

    This is a fantastic book for Christians interested in anti-racism written by experts in the field. Rarely does one find a book with such expertise behind it, and thus I really appreciated the blend of scripture, social research, and practical advice. The book covers scriptural stories with antiracist takeaways, social science research that updates the Emerson & Smith findings of two decades ago (Divided By Faith), interviews with experts in a variety of related antiracist fields (including relat This is a fantastic book for Christians interested in anti-racism written by experts in the field. Rarely does one find a book with such expertise behind it, and thus I really appreciated the blend of scripture, social research, and practical advice. The book covers scriptural stories with antiracist takeaways, social science research that updates the Emerson & Smith findings of two decades ago (Divided By Faith), interviews with experts in a variety of related antiracist fields (including related online videos), and practical steps for individuals and organizations to fight racism. This book has new insights for racial justice veterans while also providing an accessible introduction for those new to the field. I cannot emphasize enough how refreshing it is to read a book about racism that comes both from orthodox Christians and from bona fide experts in the field.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    Excellent book for church small groups and Sunday school classes. This book includes scripture, eye-opening research data, history, terminology and more. I appreciated the discussion questions and prayer at the conclusion of every chapter. Faithful Antiracism would make a wonderful choice for starting honest conversations and raise awareness about racism. Thank you to NetGalley and InterVarsity Press for the eARC of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Liz Curfman

    This book provides data and Biblical driven information on how to practically be an anti racist for the cause of Jesus. Not much was new to me, however I think it would be great for Christians that want to put a practical perspective on staying engaged with anti-racism, and it would make a great book for small groups.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joel Gustafson

    4.5

  8. 5 out of 5

    Ellie

    This book is unique in its cross-disciplinary approach to understanding racial dynamics and inequality in our current context. The authors draw on their extensive academic, professional, and faith backgrounds to put forth what can honestly be described as a work of love. Edmondson and Brennon’s commitment to the truth and their love for the church is evident throughout. That, coupled with current research and accessible language, is what makes this book so compelling. It is organized around seve This book is unique in its cross-disciplinary approach to understanding racial dynamics and inequality in our current context. The authors draw on their extensive academic, professional, and faith backgrounds to put forth what can honestly be described as a work of love. Edmondson and Brennon’s commitment to the truth and their love for the church is evident throughout. That, coupled with current research and accessible language, is what makes this book so compelling. It is organized around several different themes that serve as helpful lenses with which to consider how to intentionally work against racism in its pervasive forms. Because of that, I did not find the content to be redundant when compared to other books written on this topic. This book is packed within helpful examples, additional resources, thought-provoking questions, and prayers woven into each chapter. It would be a valuable resource to add to any organization’s toolkit, but especially so for churches seeking to be faithful to Scripture in our present moment. I would recommend this to anyone looking for practical ways to build discernment and walk in wisdom when it comes to racial justice.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This book is practical, biblically-saturated, and impactful. Whether you think racial injustice isn’t a thing or you’ve been fighting against it for years, pick this book up! Full review here: https://www.christianitytoday.com/bet... This book is practical, biblically-saturated, and impactful. Whether you think racial injustice isn’t a thing or you’ve been fighting against it for years, pick this book up! Full review here: https://www.christianitytoday.com/bet...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Carla Hendricks

    This is a great book for Christians or Christian organizations in pursuit of racial diversity and unity. The majority of the book discusses our country's racist past, while examining present-day attitudes and beliefs surrounding race and justice issues. A common belief amongst Christians today is "If we just preach the Gospel, Jesus will change hearts and prejudice and injustice will cease." To this authors Christina Edmondson and Chad Brennan respond, "Unfortunately, unbiblical and incomplete v This is a great book for Christians or Christian organizations in pursuit of racial diversity and unity. The majority of the book discusses our country's racist past, while examining present-day attitudes and beliefs surrounding race and justice issues. A common belief amongst Christians today is "If we just preach the Gospel, Jesus will change hearts and prejudice and injustice will cease." To this authors Christina Edmondson and Chad Brennan respond, "Unfortunately, unbiblical and incomplete views of the gospel hinder the ability of many Christians to effectively apply all of the Bible's teachings in regard to racial injustice in our society. Contrary to popular belief, the Bible does not teach that our relational dynamics with one another are separate from the gospel, a distraction from the gospel, or a much lower priority than the gospel." In the second half of the book, the authors state, "Our research has shown that racial dynamics in Christian organizations get worse as the racial diversity increases. Bringing together people of different races creates additional opportunities for relationships, empathy, and understanding, but it also creates additional opportunities for acts of racial prejudice, conflict, unhealthy power dynamics, and more. We must use more effective methods for measuring progress." The final chapters of the book explores that very thing - proven ways to increase progress and concrete measurements of that progress.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    This is an excellent and necessary book that tackles the Church's historic and modern-day roles in racism and antiracism. Recommended for anyone looking to learn more about how Christians should approach racial issues within and outside of the Church, even if they are new to (or even skeptical towards) the idea of antiracism. The chapters are supported both by scripture and data. The authors frequently referenced survey data which showed how opinions on systemic racism differed between Christians This is an excellent and necessary book that tackles the Church's historic and modern-day roles in racism and antiracism. Recommended for anyone looking to learn more about how Christians should approach racial issues within and outside of the Church, even if they are new to (or even skeptical towards) the idea of antiracism. The chapters are supported both by scripture and data. The authors frequently referenced survey data which showed how opinions on systemic racism differed between Christians vs. non-Christians. This was particularly heartbreaking and really emphasized how we need to do better. Many Christians just are not thinking about racism in a biblical way, and reading books like this can be great stepping stones to progress. I read this by myself, but the discussion questions at the end of each chapter would make this perfect for a Bible study or discussion group. For those looking for similar reading that explores the intersection of Christianity and racism, I'd also recommend Be the Bridge: Pursuing God's Heart for Racial Reconciliation and Divided by Faith: Evangelical Religion and the Problem of Race in America Thanks to NetGalley for this ARC!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Libby

    "Faithful Antiracism" stands out from other recently published books addressing racism within Christian contexts for a few reasons. Having one Black and one White author allows issues to be addressed from both perspectives. Many of the books I've read recently were by Black authors, and I needed their insights. I also needed Brennan's humble admissions of ways he has made mistakes in his approaches to racism. Edmondson and Brennan skim over topics that are addressed more in depth in other bookss "Faithful Antiracism" stands out from other recently published books addressing racism within Christian contexts for a few reasons. Having one Black and one White author allows issues to be addressed from both perspectives. Many of the books I've read recently were by Black authors, and I needed their insights. I also needed Brennan's humble admissions of ways he has made mistakes in his approaches to racism. Edmondson and Brennan skim over topics that are addressed more in depth in other bookss, such as Jemar Tisby's "The Color of Compromise". They themselves point out that their book moves fast so they can stay focused on "measurable change". This is my one criticism. So often I wanted more about topics they only skim over, so at times, I felt like the book lacked depth. However, I don't think they could address more without the book becoming unwieldy. They end with an imagined vision, not of paradise, but of a world where actual change has begun to take place. This epilogue was compelling because it replaces a focus on large problems with glimpses of doable solutions that will start change. Another excellent book to add to a growing (and needed) collection of Christian books about racism.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Jane

    In all our learning journeys, we need to assess what we know, what we don’t know, what we want to learn, and how we want to move forward. As a lifelong learner, I know there’s so much I have yet to learn and there’s so much I have to unlearn and relearn. Also, as someone who tries to live out my faith following Jesus, there have been many times I’ve struggled with the questions “What do I do? What do we do? How do we live out our lives fighting against the injustices in this broken world as peop In all our learning journeys, we need to assess what we know, what we don’t know, what we want to learn, and how we want to move forward. As a lifelong learner, I know there’s so much I have yet to learn and there’s so much I have to unlearn and relearn. Also, as someone who tries to live out my faith following Jesus, there have been many times I’ve struggled with the questions “What do I do? What do we do? How do we live out our lives fighting against the injustices in this broken world as people who believe in a God of justice?” Amongst the many resources available to support my/our learning & informed action, I am thankful that Faithful Anti-Racism by Dr. Christina Barland Edmondson and Chad Brennan is out in the world. It is full of research and analysis, history and often overlooked hard facts, insight and wisdom gleaned from personal stories/interviews, and practical and necessary steps to move forward. I also love that each chapter ends with a prayer and the book as a whole consistently points us to scripture to help us be antiracists who are faithful and full of faith in a God of justice.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Mhughessc

    "Faithful Antiracism: Moving Past Talk to Systemic Change" was co-written by Christina Edmondson and Chad Brennan. This book is practical, helpful, and very easy to read. According to the authors, people who are faithful antiracists are described as: having wisdom, applying the Bible, standing for justice, understanding the past and present, understanding racial trauma, and helping change society. In each section of this book, the authors give concrete evidence through graphs, charts, and person "Faithful Antiracism: Moving Past Talk to Systemic Change" was co-written by Christina Edmondson and Chad Brennan. This book is practical, helpful, and very easy to read. According to the authors, people who are faithful antiracists are described as: having wisdom, applying the Bible, standing for justice, understanding the past and present, understanding racial trauma, and helping change society. In each section of this book, the authors give concrete evidence through graphs, charts, and personal anecdotes. Each chapter also has reflection questions and a prayer as well. I was surprised by the results of the surveys, specifically from white Christians. This book would be an incredibly useful tool to use in a small group or working with Christians who have a sincere desire to be a part of the social change that is so very needed. Thanks to NetGalley for the ARC. All opinions are my own.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Eric Clapp

    As a pastor, I often have conversations that end with someone telling me, “We don’t need to talk about racism. We just need to talk about [fill in the blank… usually The Bible or Jesus].” What I love about Faithful Antiracism is that it’s a concise book that takes a few different avenues into a conversation about antiracism that is firmly rooted in the story of God’s people. I imagine this would be a great book for a church group hesitant to discuss race to read together because of the ways it cen As a pastor, I often have conversations that end with someone telling me, “We don’t need to talk about racism. We just need to talk about [fill in the blank… usually The Bible or Jesus].” What I love about Faithful Antiracism is that it’s a concise book that takes a few different avenues into a conversation about antiracism that is firmly rooted in the story of God’s people. I imagine this would be a great book for a church group hesitant to discuss race to read together because of the ways it centers discussion in prayer and scripture. At different times, this book takes a historical approach, trauma-informed approach, and ultimately lands on an appeal to traditions of faith as expressed in scripture to make its point. It’s a good addition to the conversation for its pragmatism and usefulness for beginning conversations where church folks may be more hesitant. Thank you to NetGalley and the publisher for an advanced copy in exchange for an honest review.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra

    This was a really good read! The authors did a great job with this one; both of them are Christian anti-racists. This book focuses on teaching Christians on how to be an anti-racist. It was very well researched. I actually learned some new things especially as a black women myself. I was familiar with a lot of things the book discussed. I was already familiar with anti-racism having read some literature. But this one is different because it’s through a Christian perspective. Both authors shared This was a really good read! The authors did a great job with this one; both of them are Christian anti-racists. This book focuses on teaching Christians on how to be an anti-racist. It was very well researched. I actually learned some new things especially as a black women myself. I was familiar with a lot of things the book discussed. I was already familiar with anti-racism having read some literature. But this one is different because it’s through a Christian perspective. Both authors shared stories, give history lessons, and showcases bible verses and passages and interpret them. Christians of any race needs to come together, with God as our guide, to combat racial Injustice. I highly recommend this book for those who want to be a faithful antiracist! "I received a complimentary copy of this book through NetGalley. Opinions expressed in this review are completely my own."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Richard Pulfer

    I've been looking for a book which mired the topic of antiracism with a Christian perspective, and this book certainly delivers. I particularly liked that book used Biblical understanding to support social justice, while also showing the pitfalls of "magic thinking" that has plagued both sides of the issue. This is a very in-depth and expansive study on the subject of antifacism, making it perfect for a Bible study. One small issue - the book does very occasionally employ yellow print on white p I've been looking for a book which mired the topic of antiracism with a Christian perspective, and this book certainly delivers. I particularly liked that book used Biblical understanding to support social justice, while also showing the pitfalls of "magic thinking" that has plagued both sides of the issue. This is a very in-depth and expansive study on the subject of antifacism, making it perfect for a Bible study. One small issue - the book does very occasionally employ yellow print on white pages while trying to highlight certain terms, but this can make it hard to read. It happens sparingly, but it is a bit distracting. Otherwise, it's a compelling examination of a topic issue from an oft-overlooked viewpoint.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ivy

    A good, well-researched look at how the church has handled racism in the past and focuses on helpful and not-so-helpful ways that the church can and does handle racial diversity. The authors back up their points with personal examples, excerpts of interviews and surveys from other people, as well as factual data. Excellent discussion questions are included that make you delve into your own perceptions and practical next steps are given. Definitely a book that churches and other Christian institu A good, well-researched look at how the church has handled racism in the past and focuses on helpful and not-so-helpful ways that the church can and does handle racial diversity. The authors back up their points with personal examples, excerpts of interviews and surveys from other people, as well as factual data. Excellent discussion questions are included that make you delve into your own perceptions and practical next steps are given. Definitely a book that churches and other Christian institutions should read. I received an eARC of this book from the publisher via NetGalley. All opinions expressed in this review are my own.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jarrel

    Clear and concise "next steps" on not only discussing but implementing racial justice change in an immediate and proximal sphere and in a systemic environment. Informative, heartbreaking, and truthful write-up by Christina Edmondson and Chad Brennan. I'd place this one up there with Jemar Tisby's work of the same nature. We must move past "talking" and "discussing" the ills of racism and throw ourselves into the restorative and just nature of combating white supremacy or any racial caste system Clear and concise "next steps" on not only discussing but implementing racial justice change in an immediate and proximal sphere and in a systemic environment. Informative, heartbreaking, and truthful write-up by Christina Edmondson and Chad Brennan. I'd place this one up there with Jemar Tisby's work of the same nature. We must move past "talking" and "discussing" the ills of racism and throw ourselves into the restorative and just nature of combating white supremacy or any racial caste system together.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katy

    This is a great book for discussion groups, particularly in a religious context like a Sunday School class. It was pretty light on substance and context, but it is a great way to launch into deeper discussions and serves as a good companion for other, denser texts. Thank you to NetGalley for the eARC in exchange for my honest review.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Cresenda Jones

    A must read for all who follow Christ It is past time to move to systemic change. Christians are called to be like God/Jesus.... the gospel include the good news of Jesus. TONS of practical recommendations, scriptures and reflection questions for anyone desiring to please God!!!!

  22. 4 out of 5

    AddyF

    I appreciated both the research and the biblical foundation in this book. There are a lot of books available on this topic, though, and this one didn't strike me as having a unique angle. It wouldn't be at the top of my list of books on biblical racial justice, but it was very good. I appreciated both the research and the biblical foundation in this book. There are a lot of books available on this topic, though, and this one didn't strike me as having a unique angle. It wouldn't be at the top of my list of books on biblical racial justice, but it was very good.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Very practical, very biblical.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Graydon Jones

    A fantastic book for Christians who want to effectively resist racism and pursue racial justice in their organizations and churches. This is such a helpful resource to have on your shelf!

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jaime Castañer

  26. 4 out of 5

    Ric Speigner

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kirsten Mowchan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jed Walker

  29. 5 out of 5

    Mark Muha

  30. 5 out of 5

    Avery Walker

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...