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In this compulsively readable, fascinating, and provocative guide to classical music, Norman Lebrecht, one of the world's most widely read cultural commentators, tells the story of the rise of the classical recording industry from Caruso's first notes to the heyday of Bernstein, Glenn Gould, Callas, and von Karajan. Lebrecht compellingly demonstrates that classical recordi In this compulsively readable, fascinating, and provocative guide to classical music, Norman Lebrecht, one of the world's most widely read cultural commentators, tells the story of the rise of the classical recording industry from Caruso's first notes to the heyday of Bernstein, Glenn Gould, Callas, and von Karajan. Lebrecht compellingly demonstrates that classical recording has reached its end point, but this is not simply an expos? of decline and fall. It is, for the first time, the full story of a minor art form, analyzing the cultural revolution wrought by Schnabel, Toscanini, Callas, Rattle, the Three Tenors, and Charlotte Church. It is the story of how stars were made and broken by the record business; how a war criminal conspired with a concentration-camp victim to create a record empire; and how advancing technology, boardroom wars, public credulity and unscrupulous exploitation shaped the musical backdrop to our modern lives. The book ends with a suitable shrine to classical recording: the author's critical selection of the 100 most important recordings, and the 20 most appalling. Filled with memorable incidents and unforgettable personalities, from Goddard Lieberson, legendary head of CBS Masterworks who signed his letters as God; to Georg Solti, who turned the Chicago Symphony into the loudest symphony on earth - this is at once the captivating story of the life and death of classical recording and an opinionated, insider's guide to appreciating the genre, now and for years to come.


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In this compulsively readable, fascinating, and provocative guide to classical music, Norman Lebrecht, one of the world's most widely read cultural commentators, tells the story of the rise of the classical recording industry from Caruso's first notes to the heyday of Bernstein, Glenn Gould, Callas, and von Karajan. Lebrecht compellingly demonstrates that classical recordi In this compulsively readable, fascinating, and provocative guide to classical music, Norman Lebrecht, one of the world's most widely read cultural commentators, tells the story of the rise of the classical recording industry from Caruso's first notes to the heyday of Bernstein, Glenn Gould, Callas, and von Karajan. Lebrecht compellingly demonstrates that classical recording has reached its end point, but this is not simply an expos? of decline and fall. It is, for the first time, the full story of a minor art form, analyzing the cultural revolution wrought by Schnabel, Toscanini, Callas, Rattle, the Three Tenors, and Charlotte Church. It is the story of how stars were made and broken by the record business; how a war criminal conspired with a concentration-camp victim to create a record empire; and how advancing technology, boardroom wars, public credulity and unscrupulous exploitation shaped the musical backdrop to our modern lives. The book ends with a suitable shrine to classical recording: the author's critical selection of the 100 most important recordings, and the 20 most appalling. Filled with memorable incidents and unforgettable personalities, from Goddard Lieberson, legendary head of CBS Masterworks who signed his letters as God; to Georg Solti, who turned the Chicago Symphony into the loudest symphony on earth - this is at once the captivating story of the life and death of classical recording and an opinionated, insider's guide to appreciating the genre, now and for years to come.

30 review for The Life and Death of Classical Music

  1. 4 out of 5

    Lobstergirl

    Norman Lebrecht is a curmudgeon of British extraction. Some find the music critic lovable, others hatable. I had heard his name whispered through the library stacks for years until somehow stumbling across his blog, Slippedisc (dot com), whose multiple daily posts covering the world of classical music are, over the course of a week, dull, businesslike, informative, humorous (mostly in the comments), clickbaitish, typo-filled. Lebrecht doesn’t hesitate to descend himself into the comments in orde Norman Lebrecht is a curmudgeon of British extraction. Some find the music critic lovable, others hatable. I had heard his name whispered through the library stacks for years until somehow stumbling across his blog, Slippedisc (dot com), whose multiple daily posts covering the world of classical music are, over the course of a week, dull, businesslike, informative, humorous (mostly in the comments), clickbaitish, typo-filled. Lebrecht doesn’t hesitate to descend himself into the comments in order to, usually, castigate someone or announce their outright banishment. Here for example is an excerpt from only today, regarding a very old and expensive violin stolen from a musician on a train at a Geneva station: Janice from accounting says: December 11, 2016 at 12:11 pm Was it stolen “almost from his hands” in the train, or at the train station? Two different things, and what’s “almost from his hands”, was he sleeping and the case slipped from his fingers? Lousy report. norman lebrecht says: December 11, 2016 at 12:22 pm What on earth is the matter with you? The people who have reported the theft do no [sic] speak English as a first language. It is clear from what they say that the violin was taken by force from its lawful owner. Further details will emerge in due course. We do not employ a correspondent on the platform of Geneva station. Now get back to your accounts, Janice. Dick Ewe says: December 11, 2016 at 4:23 pm I am going with Janice here. In your own words, you literally typed “do no speak English?” Apparently you don’t speak it either. Come on, Norman: you need an editor before you post: either that, or you need to learn the rules of simple syntax. You make a lot of typos in your little articles. But quite frankly, I’m sick of your stories of idiots in Europe who leave their valuable violins on a rack when they’re taking a train, or leave their violins in a cab. And then after that, it turns out that some of them have just forgotten their violin instead of it having been stolen. You have made mistakes with posting such stories as well. In my opinion, I think you toot your own horn far too much: you aren’t half as great as you think you are. Now go back to your fiddling-diddling. My fiddle rides on my lap, or it stays in between my legs and on my feet to keep it from touching the floor. I also take the strap and put it around something like my arm or my shoulder. Lucky for myself as well, I’m a big guy, so people don’t tend to mess with me. But I’m serious: these “I’m a stupid, unattentive violinist” stories have got to stop. I don’t feel pity for them when they state in their reports that the instrument was left unattended. Duh? Honest to God, would you leave a Guadagnini sitting away from you anywhere? A Guadagnini ? A GUADAGNINI ???? Mine stays locked up in the safe. Janice might be an accountant, but at least she’s accountable. Shove it, Norman. Shove it. norman lebrecht says: December 11, 2016 at 4:28 pm Nobody forces you to read Slipped Disc. I think it’s time for you to stop. So I was expecting at least a few typos in this book, along with whatever the print version of outrageous clickbait is. I was pleasantly surprised. Part I, titled Maestros, covers all the recorded history of classical music, from its birth in the late 19th century to its (apparent?) death right about now, hastened into the grave by corporate types with no understanding of the artistic side of music, driven solely by the profit motive. Part II is titled Masterpieces: 100 Milestones of the Recorded Century. These are not necessarily the best recordings ever made, but the most influential. Part III is Madness: 20 Recordings that Should Never Have Been Made. Again, these are not the worst records ever made, not records made by bad musicians, but those “produced with the best of intentions and performed by the finest artists yet which, in one particular or another, stray so far from the intended purpose that they present a caricature of recording, a Versailles mirror in which everything is warped.” After a slightly boring beginning, more or less the first 25% of the book, Lebrecht and his stories began to get more interesting. For example, there’s the story of Herbert von Karajan (who seems to be a particular Lebrecht bugaboo). Karajan had asked Deutsche Grammophon to pay him a flat fee per LP in order to keep royalties from his wife, whom he was divorcing. But the records sold extremely well; Karajan estimated the scheme had cost him 6 million deutschmarks. He demanded that DG make up the financial loss. Glenn Gould, not too long before he died, called the conductor Neville Marriner wanting to make a recording with his orchestra. The two chatted and “Gould told him that, on a good day, he might get two minutes of music into the can.” ‘That would be uneconomic,’ said Marriner. They agreed that Gould would play the solo part of a Beethoven concerto in his studio and send it to Marriner, who would wrap an orchestra around it.” [This is a terrible idea.] Gould died before it could happen. Then there’s the story Lebrecht got “from a family friend” – whose family, isn’t specified. Karajan had just died, leaving a fortune of half a billion dollars to which royalties were still accruing, and he was quietly and secretly buried in Anif, Austria. “On the third night after his death, the widow Eliette went up to the grounds to commune with her loss. As she neared the grave, she sensed another presence. “Who’s there?” she cried, “what do you want?” “It’s me, Carlos Kleiber,” wept the world’s most elusive conductor. “I had to come. He was the one I admired most.” Perhaps you, like me, bought a Jenő Jandó CD back in the day and always wondered who the heck he was. He was one of the inexpensive performers signed by Naxos Records, the budget label which would record the most obscure eastern European artists and orchestras, paying them minimal amounts (orchestral players got $100 per disc, conductors and soloists $500 or $1,000 and no royalties), and charging $6 for a disc in the 80s. As it happened, an album of Beethoven sonatas with Jenő Jandó sold 250,000 units. Since Jandó got no royalties, he was out of luck. Naxos clips sometimes made it onto TV shows like ER, Sex and the City, and The Sopranos, earning Naxos’ CEO big royalties and the performers nothing. The worst aspect of the book is that the endnotes are stuck smack in the middle, after Part I. Publishers, this stinks. But Lebrecht has a snappy way with words; Peter Gelb, then an executive with CBS records, now the GM of the Metropolitan Opera, “hit the social circuit with the look of a fortyish spinster at a debutantes’ ball.” (Gelb is another one Lebrecht likes to mock.) “Otto Klemperer’s [composing] efforts fall into early (1920s Berlin) and late (1960s London), the first period overshadowed by Kurt Weill, the latter thick with undigested Mahler.” Schubert’s Winterreise with singer Peter Pears and pianist (and his lover) Benjamin Britten is #7 on the Madness list. Pears had a certain admirable way with opera, but “in Lieder, hardly got through one song unblemished. To reach a high note, he strained or blared. At the low end, he growled and snuffled. His delivery was nasal, as if one nostril were permanently blocked. His German was imprecise and his entries inelegant. In song after song he teetered at the edge of wrong notes like a tightrope walker on Temazepam. Britten leaped in to save him with a beautifully turned rubato, most daringly in Einsamkeit, where Pears was going it alone down a dead man’s gulch.” #10 on the not-good list is A Different Mozart – “at first hearing, this sounds like the scores Mozart sold to Starbucks.” #11 is the Verdi Requiem with Renee Fleming, Olga Borodina, Andrea Bocelli and others, conducted by Valery Gergiev. Gergiev was eager to conduct it on the centennial year of Verdi’s death; he was told he would have to get an all-star line-up in order to break even. The label (Decca) saddled him with Bocelli. “Bocelli’s solos started sweetly, if simplistically …But whenever he had to reach for a note he would slide and swoop like a kid on a playground, oblivious to dignity and art. It was soon obvious that he lacked the technique to cope with Verdi’s subtle shifts of emotion and, joined by the big guns in the great set pieces, Bocelli is exposed as cruelly as a Sunday morning park footballer would be in the World Cup final. To hear Fleming and Borodina cramp their exceptional voices to his limitations is an embarrassment to the listener and an indictment of the makers of this record.” This is an entertaining book. If you have no classical taste or understanding, a book like this which explains differences in quality and some of the reasons behind them can help you develop it.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Isidore

    Can this straightforward, reasonable book really be by the nasty author of The Maestro Myth? I suppose Lebrecht has mellowed over the years––not enough for the founder of Naxos, mind you, who brought legal pressure to bear and prevented the book's release in Britain, claiming that the section dealing with his company is full of egregious errors. Lebrcht must rue the day when he stopped maligning the safely unlitigious dead. But really, having been so repelled by his earlier work, I am amazed to f Can this straightforward, reasonable book really be by the nasty author of The Maestro Myth? I suppose Lebrecht has mellowed over the years––not enough for the founder of Naxos, mind you, who brought legal pressure to bear and prevented the book's release in Britain, claiming that the section dealing with his company is full of egregious errors. Lebrcht must rue the day when he stopped maligning the safely unlitigious dead. But really, having been so repelled by his earlier work, I am amazed to find very little to disagree with here. I have no trouble believing the essential truth of Lebrecht's account of how the classical music industry was ruined by a new breed of uncultured corporate buccaneers far more interested in perks and high salaries than in recording music. After all, looters of this kind have been all too busy everywhere else in Big Business over the past thirty years. One point which Lebrecht does not explore, but which dovetails neatly with his argument, is that the same corporate mentality was equally destructive on the purely retail level. Once upon a time, you went to your local record store and discussed your prospective purchase with a knowledgeable salesperson, and perhaps even auditioned the record in a listening room before buying it. This pleasant, and I would say necessary model for selling classical records disappeared when the big, brutal chain stores took over. These were quite literally modeled on supermarkets: records, like grapefruit, were supposed to sell themselves, and the staff was only there to point the customer at the fruit pile. This may have worked with rock, but the neophyte interested in exploring the unfamiliar world of the classics would rarely get the necessary assistance from staff members who were untrained, paid a minimum wage, and discouraged from staying very long and developing ideas about expertise and advancement. Customers could forget about hearing a record before buying it ––although distributors continued to provide demonstration records for this purpose, they were usually snapped up by store managers to augment their private collections. True, prices were low, much lower than the old stores, which furnished so much more to the customer, could charge and still remain in business. But it's small wonder the buying public for classical dwindled until there was no longer a large enough market to sustain the major labels! Lebrecht supplements (an unkind person might say "pads") his study with a list of the hundred most important classical recordings in history, and another of the twenty worst. Although he makes the customary claim of impartiality, his list, like all such lists, is littered with idiosyncrasies: he seems particularly interested in "crossover" recordings (ten in List A, eight in List B), and a whopping thirteen important recordings are there in part because he sees them as anti-Communist (Lebrecht knows that whenever a Russian musician plays sadly, or agitatedly, it's because he's thinking of Stalin). Such foibles don't detract from the list's interest and entertainment value, and on the whole his selections are reasonable, if heavily weighted to recent years; even Toscanini puts in a few appearances, despite having been consigned to the Outer Darkness in Lebrecht's earlier book. However, his omission of the famous Walter-Ferrier Das Lied von der Erde is astonishing, and Lebrecht really gets out of hand when he places the Peter Pears Winterreise among the worst recordings ever made. He's welcome not to like it, and Pears's voice isn't always lovely, but it's scarcely one of the twenty worst recordings of all time. Altogether, a useful, informative, and entertaining book. I wouldn't take it as the last word on the collapse of the classics, given its sketchiness and Lebrecht's reputation for inaccuracy, but until a reputable historian takes on the subject it will suffice.

  3. 4 out of 5

    James Lewis

    A fascinating, but marred history of classical music recording. As such, it is glaringly misnamed, for it is neither a history of classical music, as such, nor of the attendance and financial plight of many orchestras. It is about recording, and as such is a very interesting account. But it has its flaws. Norman Lebrecht is a British cultural critic who sometimes runs so close to gossip that he might be thought of as the Hedda Hopper of classical music. This book was first published under the ti A fascinating, but marred history of classical music recording. As such, it is glaringly misnamed, for it is neither a history of classical music, as such, nor of the attendance and financial plight of many orchestras. It is about recording, and as such is a very interesting account. But it has its flaws. Norman Lebrecht is a British cultural critic who sometimes runs so close to gossip that he might be thought of as the Hedda Hopper of classical music. This book was first published under the title Maestros, Masterpieces, and Madness in the UK. But all copies were pulped after Lebrecht lost a defamation suit brought by Naxos Records impresario Klaus Heymann. The US version was not affected by the ruling, so the "15 inaccuracies in 3 pages" still stand. There's more. Lebrecht claims Seiji Ozawa and the Boston Symphony were signed to a recording contract because it was a non-union orchestra, which is not the case. He has contempt for any non-classical recordings made by classical artists, dismissing Yo Yo Ma's recording on "Appalachian Waltz" with Mark O'Connor and Edgar Meyer as "a hillbilly album." He heaps mild contempt on innovative approaches like Naxos Records, even though it stands in sharp contrast to the overproduction of classical warhorses that he cites as one of the causes of the decline in classical recording. (Signum Classics, whose Mahler symphonic cycle by Lorin Maazel and the Philharmonia Orchestra I am listening to as I write this is not even mentioned.) Lebrecht sometimes jumps two decades in a single paragraph, tying together events that are not necessarily connected in order to make a point. Some of the writing seems to take place in a mad rush, with protagonists and antagonists entering and existing in near pandemonium, making it difficult to follow the thread of the story. For all these faults, Lebrecht does a great job of presenting the arc that is classical music from its inception in the early recordings of of Caruso to its contraction (I dispute that it's in collapse) following the introduction of the CD and the retrenchment of the big classical labels is an engaging and valuable history. The personalities of the maestros and the corporate chieftains who populated the golden age of recording are valuable, if often gossipy. (Every gay man is outed, regardless of the relevance to the story.) The history of the technological advances will be of great interest to everyone in the audio field. Finally, there is great meat in the appendix, which occupies fully half the book, that lists Lebrecht's list of 100 milestones in recording history and 20 "recordings that should never have been made." One may quarrel with some of his selections, but the stories behind them are invaluable. It's a fine book for what it gets right. It's unfortunate that so much is wrong and tendentious.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Maximilian Gerboc

    The title is a bit misleading - this book is primarily a history of classical music RECORDING, which, to be honest, was much more interesting than I thought it would be. Told in Lebrecht's tabloid style, we get to see how the technology was first developed. Then, most interestingly, we get to know all of the major music labels and the personalities involved in the companies. The history and the economics of the industry are fascinating - the booms and busts, market over-saturation, technological The title is a bit misleading - this book is primarily a history of classical music RECORDING, which, to be honest, was much more interesting than I thought it would be. Told in Lebrecht's tabloid style, we get to see how the technology was first developed. Then, most interestingly, we get to know all of the major music labels and the personalities involved in the companies. The history and the economics of the industry are fascinating - the booms and busts, market over-saturation, technological advances, all mixed with the great visionaries and shithead corporatists (all with hilariously large egos) - and I honestly wish this had been a bit longer to really delve into those topics more. For anyone interested in this very niche history (and who doesn't mind the gossip-column-like style), this is an educational and entertaining read. The second half of this book is really a look through famously good recordings (and some famously bad). The reviews he has for each one, describing the merits and historical context, were of particular interest.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Peter Ruark

    This is a fascinating book on the history of classical music recording from which I learned a lot, and the second section with "100 recording milestones" and "20 recordings that should have never been made" is interesting as well. The reason it doesn't get five stars from me? I cannot trust that all of its assertions are true. Other commenters have written about the Klaus Heymann defamation suit against the author and the publisher, but I have also been told (on an online forum by someone whose This is a fascinating book on the history of classical music recording from which I learned a lot, and the second section with "100 recording milestones" and "20 recordings that should have never been made" is interesting as well. The reason it doesn't get five stars from me? I cannot trust that all of its assertions are true. Other commenters have written about the Klaus Heymann defamation suit against the author and the publisher, but I have also been told (on an online forum by someone whose wife was actually there) that his account in the "20 recordings" section of Bernstein conducting Elgar with the BBC Orchestra portrayed the recording sessions quite unfairly. Lebrecht is a fascinating storyteller and I can certainly recommend this book, albeit with the caveat that readers should take some of the insider stories with a grain of salt.

  6. 5 out of 5

    C

    I didn't think I was particularly interested in the history of the music recording industry, but I ended up finishing it, surprisingly, so it was very readable. The author's extensive knowledge of music recordings is incredible. Some good lines which made me laugh, ex. "The blind pop singer Andrea Bocelli was redesignated classical and foisted on Valery Gergiev as a soloist in the Verdi Requiem, which he vocally murdered." I didn't think I was particularly interested in the history of the music recording industry, but I ended up finishing it, surprisingly, so it was very readable. The author's extensive knowledge of music recordings is incredible. Some good lines which made me laugh, ex. "The blind pop singer Andrea Bocelli was redesignated classical and foisted on Valery Gergiev as a soloist in the Verdi Requiem, which he vocally murdered."

  7. 5 out of 5

    Wei Gao

    uninterested in the label gossips

  8. 4 out of 5

    Roland

    A delightfully bitchy history of recorded classical music, from Caruso to Church. Coming to this material as a complete novice, I found that Lebrecht bounced around between events a bit too unevenly for my liking, and the story he tells rarely feels like a well-constructed timeline. However, I'm willing to look past that because his writing is full of personality and I felt like I got to know the characters presented in this story. The history is great, and just as good is his list at the end of A delightfully bitchy history of recorded classical music, from Caruso to Church. Coming to this material as a complete novice, I found that Lebrecht bounced around between events a bit too unevenly for my liking, and the story he tells rarely feels like a well-constructed timeline. However, I'm willing to look past that because his writing is full of personality and I felt like I got to know the characters presented in this story. The history is great, and just as good is his list at the end of the book of essential and worthless recordings. Unlike many classical music guides that I've read, this one explains exactly why a performance stands out, what makes it different from other recordings of the same piece, and the conditions that it was recorded under. While flawed, I liked this book enough that I'd like to add it to my collection at some point, mainly as a reference when seeking out performances.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Tony Gleeson

    I've enjoyed Norman Lebrecht in his earlier books-- "Discord," "The Maestro Myth"-- where he's consistently been witty, engaging, cynical, informed, opinionated and quirky. He carries through in this telescoped history of classical music recording. It can get a little confusing, what with so many characters and events being rattled off at breakneck speed, and there's seldom a question of how he really feels about any of the artists or executives included. Lebrecht means "death" in a quite litera I've enjoyed Norman Lebrecht in his earlier books-- "Discord," "The Maestro Myth"-- where he's consistently been witty, engaging, cynical, informed, opinionated and quirky. He carries through in this telescoped history of classical music recording. It can get a little confusing, what with so many characters and events being rattled off at breakneck speed, and there's seldom a question of how he really feels about any of the artists or executives included. Lebrecht means "death" in a quite literal sense-- he states that he believes the true classical recording industry is gone. He offers up plenty of reasons and plenty of villains. It's a fascinating read for anyone at all interested in the classics on LP or CD. Probably the last part of the book will get more attention-- his lists of what he feels to be the 100 most important classical recordings of all time, from the 1920s to the 2000s, and the 20 absolutely worst of all time. I found plenty to disagree with but never was less than entertained and informed all the way through.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This book would have been better (for me) if it concentrated on the best 10 or 20 classical recordings - and went into much more detail -than a paragraph or 2. I found the political history and how it affected not only composers, conductors and other musicians but recording companies as well, really interesting. I quite enjoy Mr Lebrecht's writing style - I just wish that he went into way more detail on why the recordings were chosen, This book would have been better (for me) if it concentrated on the best 10 or 20 classical recordings - and went into much more detail -than a paragraph or 2. I found the political history and how it affected not only composers, conductors and other musicians but recording companies as well, really interesting. I quite enjoy Mr Lebrecht's writing style - I just wish that he went into way more detail on why the recordings were chosen,

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ernest

    An interesting read which seeks to pull the curtain back on the world of classical music recording and expose the politics and characters behind them. This book would have the most relevance to those with knowledge of classical music. The (necessarily subjective) best and worse recordings list is interesting, if not always agreed.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Samuel

    Lebrecht has real flaws -- he's smug, overly opinionated, and far too prone to talking in superlatives. However, he also clearly loves this music, and knows it better than almost anyone else alive. His recounting of the back-room machinations behind classical recording is fascinating, and I enjoyed the list of great recordings to check out. Lebrecht has real flaws -- he's smug, overly opinionated, and far too prone to talking in superlatives. However, he also clearly loves this music, and knows it better than almost anyone else alive. His recounting of the back-room machinations behind classical recording is fascinating, and I enjoyed the list of great recordings to check out.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Behind the scenes history of the twentieth century recording industry heard through the ears of classical music. Reminded me why I don't own some of these masterpieces, and made me want to get them. Behind the scenes history of the twentieth century recording industry heard through the ears of classical music. Reminded me why I don't own some of these masterpieces, and made me want to get them.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ross Mckinney

    A not very exciting history of the classical record/CD industry. I was interested in the topic, but this is short on details when it should have them, long on catty insider stories when they aren't that interesting. I'd pass. A not very exciting history of the classical record/CD industry. I was interested in the topic, but this is short on details when it should have them, long on catty insider stories when they aren't that interesting. I'd pass.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Guillaume Bourgault

    Already loving it: witty!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Andy

    A shimmering whistle-stop tour of a century of culture-defining recorded classical music. How it came about and why it finally killed itself. Essential reading for classical music lovers.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ed

    Really gives you an idea of how the classical culture and industry operate. And the 20 worst are amusing.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Linda Gaines

    Interesting to see the author's take on the death of classical music and his "best" recordings. I have a few of them. Interesting to see the author's take on the death of classical music and his "best" recordings. I have a few of them.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Douglaszhao

    What is the 100 Best and 20 Worst is not the important,most reasonable is the view of the author.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rin Saunders

  21. 5 out of 5

    Aurelie

  22. 4 out of 5

    Scott

  23. 5 out of 5

    Zayatz

  24. 4 out of 5

    Katy Wright

  25. 4 out of 5

    Xav

  26. 5 out of 5

    Dylan

  27. 4 out of 5

    Josh M

  28. 5 out of 5

    Greg

  29. 4 out of 5

    David Wonfor

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jrs

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