website statistics Consorting with Spirits: Your Guide to Working with Invisible Allies - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Consorting with Spirits: Your Guide to Working with Invisible Allies

Availability: Ready to download

Spirits have power and knowledge. Learn how to summon, communicate, and negotiate with the unseen. We are all spirits, and as such have the ability to communicate with other spirits. The physical body presents some limitations that can be overcome with training, but which can also be leveraged to give other spirits a link to the physical form that they seek. Working with sp Spirits have power and knowledge. Learn how to summon, communicate, and negotiate with the unseen. We are all spirits, and as such have the ability to communicate with other spirits. The physical body presents some limitations that can be overcome with training, but which can also be leveraged to give other spirits a link to the physical form that they seek. Working with spirits can enable your most powerful magickal goals. From calling on spirits to help with protection, money, and knowledge, the skills learned here will help you tap into power with your spirit allies. Consorting with Spirits is a system of practices for training the mind and energy body on three abilities: The capacity to sense spirits, the capacity to interact with spirits, and the capacity to deepen and clarify that interaction. It is this deepening and clarifying that has been missing from much of the material about spirits. Consorting with Spirits shares: Proper training necessary for calling and conversing with spirits. How to evaluate the messages you receive. A full view of different modes of contact and what situations each mode lends itself to Why the best sorcery is local. The tools to establish and maintain a long-term relationship with spirits (consorting). The 6 different manifestations of spirits and their corresponding magickal operations, qualities, benefits, and drawbacks. The 4 methods of interacting with spirits: prayer, conjuring, compelling, and evocation.


Compare

Spirits have power and knowledge. Learn how to summon, communicate, and negotiate with the unseen. We are all spirits, and as such have the ability to communicate with other spirits. The physical body presents some limitations that can be overcome with training, but which can also be leveraged to give other spirits a link to the physical form that they seek. Working with sp Spirits have power and knowledge. Learn how to summon, communicate, and negotiate with the unseen. We are all spirits, and as such have the ability to communicate with other spirits. The physical body presents some limitations that can be overcome with training, but which can also be leveraged to give other spirits a link to the physical form that they seek. Working with spirits can enable your most powerful magickal goals. From calling on spirits to help with protection, money, and knowledge, the skills learned here will help you tap into power with your spirit allies. Consorting with Spirits is a system of practices for training the mind and energy body on three abilities: The capacity to sense spirits, the capacity to interact with spirits, and the capacity to deepen and clarify that interaction. It is this deepening and clarifying that has been missing from much of the material about spirits. Consorting with Spirits shares: Proper training necessary for calling and conversing with spirits. How to evaluate the messages you receive. A full view of different modes of contact and what situations each mode lends itself to Why the best sorcery is local. The tools to establish and maintain a long-term relationship with spirits (consorting). The 6 different manifestations of spirits and their corresponding magickal operations, qualities, benefits, and drawbacks. The 4 methods of interacting with spirits: prayer, conjuring, compelling, and evocation.

30 review for Consorting with Spirits: Your Guide to Working with Invisible Allies

  1. 5 out of 5

    Indigo Crow

    Okay, so, before anybody gets butthurt, I want to be perfectly clear that my review is my opinion and I have nothing against the author. As a matter of fact, I find his writing to be quite good and I enjoy his sense of humor. That said, here's my take on this book: It's good, but could've been better. This is not necessarily the author's fault. He mentions at the end of the book that the publisher gave a due date and a **word count limit**. If that's true, I think it's awful of the publisher beca Okay, so, before anybody gets butthurt, I want to be perfectly clear that my review is my opinion and I have nothing against the author. As a matter of fact, I find his writing to be quite good and I enjoy his sense of humor. That said, here's my take on this book: It's good, but could've been better. This is not necessarily the author's fault. He mentions at the end of the book that the publisher gave a due date and a **word count limit**. If that's true, I think it's awful of the publisher because it means less useful information is able to be given due to a weird limit. In fact, I get suspicious of books under 250 pages. So there's that. The summary on the back doesn't give a very accurate idea of what this book is about, either. Not really. While it does talk about conjuring and conversing with various spirits and how to form relationships with them on the back, the spirits it talks mostly about in the book itself are demons. I have no issues with spirits that are considered to be demons, but they do come from a culture I'm not part of and a belief system I'm openly hostile toward, so unfortunately that means this isn't all that useful to me. Sure, I can adjust the rituals to work with spirits and gods I'm more comfortable with. I have experience with that kind of thing. But the summary doesn't say this, so I think it's useful to pass that on to the potential reader on case they feel the same as I do. The author also says this should not be your first book of this nature and he's not wrong. You need a basic understanding of magic and spirits before you get into this. While this book hasn't really helped me all that much, like I said, I enjoy this author's writing style and his humor. For that alone I'm interested in his other books, which for all I know, might be of better use to me. Do I recommend this book? Um... yes and no. Yes if you're an all purpose magician that doesn't care which types of gods or spirits you work with. No if you're like me and want nothing to do with beings associated with the Abrahamic religions.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Nikos

    I’ve had a growing interest in spirit work, so when I came across this book, I was very interested in seeing what it had to say. I realized later that the author, Jason Miller, gives famous classes on Hekatean magic, which added to my curiosity. That said, I was more concerned than informed by what I read in the book itself. My understanding is that Miller has undergone Buddhist training. Despite this training, I found (as someone more or less Buddhist as well) that his treatment of Buddhist teac I’ve had a growing interest in spirit work, so when I came across this book, I was very interested in seeing what it had to say. I realized later that the author, Jason Miller, gives famous classes on Hekatean magic, which added to my curiosity. That said, I was more concerned than informed by what I read in the book itself. My understanding is that Miller has undergone Buddhist training. Despite this training, I found (as someone more or less Buddhist as well) that his treatment of Buddhist teachings flattened their significance. Tibetan Buddhist rites and knowledge are treated as a sort of add-on to Western magic, instead of an entirely separate, rich tradition. I was extremely concerned by his rendering of a Luciferian version of a Buddhist prayer of taking refuge. While I don’t doubt he respects and knows about Tibetan Buddhism, his inability to keep things separate recurs throughout the book, and gives me a strong feeling of a culture vulture. His lack of ability to maintain entirely separate practices when necessary is perhaps highlighted by Miller’s description of his encounter with Hekate at Pashupatinath in Nepal (p.191). As someone who both engages in Hellenic Polytheism, Shinto, and Buddhism, it is always of absolute necessity that I am able to correctly keep my practices separate when appropriate. This isn’t to say you can’t ever practice syncretism — Shinto and Buddhism very naturally go together — but you can’t claim you saw an Ancient Greek goddess in a sacred site in Nepal and expect no pushback from Buddhists, or even just Asian occultists in general. His treatment of the historical reality of the witch trials is disappointing as well. On p. 337 he acknowledges that the “confessions” were given under torture, but stubbornly continues believing the stories they were forced to tell anyway. He also genders the victims as predominantly female in this passage (though at least he acknowledges male priests later), when witch trial accusations were not that consistently gendered and often antisemitic in nature. Even with the historical background, I find it highly colonialist to refer to Astaroth as ruler of the Americas (and Lucifer of Asia, etc.) when Astaroth and Lucifer and so on are all settler-brought spirits. I’ve noticed demonolatry has an ongoing problem with this sort of thing, but I was very startled how Miller repeatedly referred to Astaroth as ruler of the Americas, as if the peoples living here haven’t been colonized religiously and physically enough. There are also some statements he made with troubling larger implications that he either does not care to consider, or has never felt concerned about as a white man whose culture is not continually exploited. One is his condescension towards tradition. He is mercifully of neither the “instructions must always be followed to the letter” nor “intent is all that matters” school, but at the same time, I find myself insulted on behalf of multiple traditions that “To think that we must do things as they have always been done just for the sake of doing it that way is silly. We don’t do this with science, with medicine, with art, or even with religion, so we don’t need to do it with magic (p.245-6).” I can speak from my own experience and point to multiple lowercase-i indigenous traditions to say this is false. Plenty of religions have done it that way, not because older is better, necessarily, but for reasons like honoring what ancestors did, or preserving dying cultural artforms. This level of callousness is a really big turn-off for me. Finally, in the Q&A at the end, he claims that “…some [traditions] that claim to be closed can be opened from the outside (p.397).” While he immediately follows this with the statement that some traditions are completely closed, I see more harm than good in implying a closed tradition could be ‘forced’ open by way of spirits (and possible imposter spirits, at that). In the end, this book ended up being more of the author’s thoughts on how the world works, with a few rituals thrown in of questionable value. His taste for Othered cultures overpowers the content in a way that makes the book racialized in a very uncomfortable way for non-white people like myself.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Asuka

    Much like Jason Miller's other books, Consorting with Spirits is a straight-to-the-point book on how to cultivate lasting, meaningful connections with the spirits around us. Much like the spirits I work with, Miller goes into working with astral beings such as demons and nature spirits more than those of the dead. I would say, that at this point in my life, I'm a reasonably experienced spirit worker, and I still found Miller's insights and guidance to be helpful, in that it was informative on h Much like Jason Miller's other books, Consorting with Spirits is a straight-to-the-point book on how to cultivate lasting, meaningful connections with the spirits around us. Much like the spirits I work with, Miller goes into working with astral beings such as demons and nature spirits more than those of the dead. I would say, that at this point in my life, I'm a reasonably experienced spirit worker, and I still found Miller's insights and guidance to be helpful, in that it was informative on how we view spirit work and some ways to cultivate a lasting relationship with spirits. I will admit that I am not the most practiced ceremonialist, so I found his examples of conjuration circles extremely helpful in figuring out how I'd like to go about doing my own. I would easily recommend this book to anybody who is interested in starting spirit work (though not a beginner occultist/witch/practitioner). As Miller states at the beginning of this book, "This should probably not be your first book magic." I would class this as a more intermediate to advanced book, just as spirit work from an occultist perspective, like Millers, often requires a foundation of knowing some magic already. Would I recommend this book? Yes (as long as you aren't a complete beginner) How would I rate it? 9.5/10

  4. 4 out of 5

    Julia M Smith

    Pragmatic Approach This book is practical and down to earth despite its spiritual content. Having made every imaginable mistake and them some, I can safely say this is the book I would have wanted thirty plus years ago. This is book is a common sense straight shooter. I highly recommend.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kirby Coe

    Interesting book —glad I read it. Cool stuff to consider. Nice writing style—accessible, yet intelligent. I like how the author does let the reader know that he despite his years of experience, he readily admits that he doesn’t know everything.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jorge

    Practical. Grounded A good book on the experience of interacting with spirits. Not a manual but full of usefull tips. Make me laugh continous references to " you can read these on the other books of mine" (yes Jason, i'm going to buy some) Practical. Grounded A good book on the experience of interacting with spirits. Not a manual but full of usefull tips. Make me laugh continous references to " you can read these on the other books of mine" (yes Jason, i'm going to buy some)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jeanine

    Not really my style, it seems too christian based.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Barnes

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Well Written Book . From an experienced Sorcerer

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kenneth

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jean-Pierre

  11. 5 out of 5

    Joseph

  12. 4 out of 5

    Crow

  13. 5 out of 5

    Byron Mármol

  14. 5 out of 5

    Fady Hany

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jackson Hart

  16. 4 out of 5

    Cheyanne

  17. 5 out of 5

    Venus

  18. 5 out of 5

    Hillel Maor

  19. 4 out of 5

    Vince Kegler

  20. 5 out of 5

    Rebeca Orellana

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eliza

  22. 5 out of 5

    Rhi Rhi

  23. 4 out of 5

    ReD

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marcia Silva

  25. 5 out of 5

    Danny C

  26. 5 out of 5

    Analouise Keating

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jan Rezac

  28. 5 out of 5

    Dustin

  29. 5 out of 5

    James Wine

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nicole Marie

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...