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"The Way to Wealth" is an essay written by Benjamin Franklin in 1758. It is a collection of adages and advice presented in Poor Richard's Almanac during its first 25 years of publication, organized into a speech given by "Father Abraham" to a group of people. Many of the phrases Father Abraham quotes continue to be familiar today. The essay's advice is based on the themes "The Way to Wealth" is an essay written by Benjamin Franklin in 1758. It is a collection of adages and advice presented in Poor Richard's Almanac during its first 25 years of publication, organized into a speech given by "Father Abraham" to a group of people. Many of the phrases Father Abraham quotes continue to be familiar today. The essay's advice is based on the themes of work ethic and frugality. Some phrases from the almanac quoted in "The Way to Wealth" include: "There are no gains, without pains" "One today is worth two tomorrows" "A life of leisure and a life of laziness are two things" "Get what you can, and what you get hold" "Sloth, like rust, consumes faster than labor wears, while the used key is always bright" "Have you somewhat to do tomorrow, do it today" "The eye of a master will do more work than both his hands" "Early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise" "For want of a nail..."


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"The Way to Wealth" is an essay written by Benjamin Franklin in 1758. It is a collection of adages and advice presented in Poor Richard's Almanac during its first 25 years of publication, organized into a speech given by "Father Abraham" to a group of people. Many of the phrases Father Abraham quotes continue to be familiar today. The essay's advice is based on the themes "The Way to Wealth" is an essay written by Benjamin Franklin in 1758. It is a collection of adages and advice presented in Poor Richard's Almanac during its first 25 years of publication, organized into a speech given by "Father Abraham" to a group of people. Many of the phrases Father Abraham quotes continue to be familiar today. The essay's advice is based on the themes of work ethic and frugality. Some phrases from the almanac quoted in "The Way to Wealth" include: "There are no gains, without pains" "One today is worth two tomorrows" "A life of leisure and a life of laziness are two things" "Get what you can, and what you get hold" "Sloth, like rust, consumes faster than labor wears, while the used key is always bright" "Have you somewhat to do tomorrow, do it today" "The eye of a master will do more work than both his hands" "Early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise" "For want of a nail..."

30 review for The Way to Wealth

  1. 4 out of 5

    Vaishali

    An interesting read from Colonial America's Renaissance man. Franklin frequently quotes his alias, Poor Richard. He also laments high taxes under the crown (then 10% ). A few wonderful, noteworthy quotes : ------------------------------ "Lost time can never be found again." "One today is worth two tomorrows." "Since thou are not sure of a minute, throw not away an hour." "Keep thy shop, and thy shop will keep thee." "If you would have a faithful servant, and one you'd like, serve yourself." "A fat kitc An interesting read from Colonial America's Renaissance man. Franklin frequently quotes his alias, Poor Richard. He also laments high taxes under the crown (then 10% ). A few wonderful, noteworthy quotes : ------------------------------ "Lost time can never be found again." "One today is worth two tomorrows." "Since thou are not sure of a minute, throw not away an hour." "Keep thy shop, and thy shop will keep thee." "If you would have a faithful servant, and one you'd like, serve yourself." "A fat kitchen makes a lean will." "Wise men learn by others harms; fools scarcely by their own." "A ploughman on his legs is higher than a gentleman on his knees." "Pride is as loud a beggar as want." "They that won't be counseled can't be helped." .

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    Still has much to say to us after so many years - sound advice that is rooted in common sense.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Saeed

    We are taxed twice as much by our idleness. Idleness taxes many of us much more, if we reckon all that is spent in absolute sloth, or doing of nothing, with that which is spent in idle employments or amusements, that amount to nothing. Sloth,by bringing on diseases, absolutely shortens life. Sloth, like rust, consumes faster than labor wears, while the used key is always bright. --------------------------- The Indies have not made Spain rich, because her outgoes are greater than her incomes. Away t We are taxed twice as much by our idleness. Idleness taxes many of us much more, if we reckon all that is spent in absolute sloth, or doing of nothing, with that which is spent in idle employments or amusements, that amount to nothing. Sloth,by bringing on diseases, absolutely shortens life. Sloth, like rust, consumes faster than labor wears, while the used key is always bright. --------------------------- The Indies have not made Spain rich, because her outgoes are greater than her incomes. Away then with your expensive follies, and you will not have so much cause to complain of hard times, heavy taxes, and chargeable families; for, as Poor Dick says, Women and wine, game and deceit, Make the wealth small, and the wants great.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Faye

    This essay is a great read I would recommend to everyone for practical and common sense advice that is so lacking in modern society. What a shame.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joe Moses

    Hodgepodge of ideological advice which Franklin synthesized from his Poor Richard's Almanack arranged as a type of sermon from "Father Abraham". Certainly contains some witty adages and timeless truisms on prudence, temperance, and diligence, but overall its philosophy is a secularized "Calvinist work ethic" which was common in colonial times - a valuing of frugality and hard work as a means to social status and success in order to prove one's salvation. Although the modern "American work ethic" Hodgepodge of ideological advice which Franklin synthesized from his Poor Richard's Almanack arranged as a type of sermon from "Father Abraham". Certainly contains some witty adages and timeless truisms on prudence, temperance, and diligence, but overall its philosophy is a secularized "Calvinist work ethic" which was common in colonial times - a valuing of frugality and hard work as a means to social status and success in order to prove one's salvation. Although the modern "American work ethic" may no longer carry the motivation to prove one's predestination, it nevertheless evolved from such industrious "wisdom". Franklin, a deist, were he alive now, might see the emphasis on industriousness for the sake of consumerism and materialism in the U.S. today as a kind of vice rather than virtue. The text is more valuable as an artifact of American history rather than a timeless classic containing any coherent economic philosophy.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jo

    Good advice for retards with no common sense

  7. 4 out of 5

    Tomás

    ...as poor richard says

  8. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    Quick little read that contains an amazing number of famous sayings. Virtues of savings and frugality have a long history dating back to Ben Franklin. Your financial independence reading list isn’t complete without breezing through this little historical treasure.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Keating

    This book is kind of a ripoff. Small. Kinda boring. I think I got a bad edition. Anyway, from now on I'll look up Franklin stuff up online. This book is kind of a ripoff. Small. Kinda boring. I think I got a bad edition. Anyway, from now on I'll look up Franklin stuff up online.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Simon Eskildsen

    Very short book that does a great job of extracting the parts of Franklin's autobiography and almanac on matters relevant to setting yourself up for success in business. "Experience keeps a dear school, but fools learn in no other" is one of my favourite quotes from the book. Another one on the defence of state taxes: "We are taxed twice as much by our idleness, three times as much by our pride, and four times as much by our folly." The book is structured around 5 areas that you must master: (1) Very short book that does a great job of extracting the parts of Franklin's autobiography and almanac on matters relevant to setting yourself up for success in business. "Experience keeps a dear school, but fools learn in no other" is one of my favourite quotes from the book. Another one on the defence of state taxes: "We are taxed twice as much by our idleness, three times as much by our pride, and four times as much by our folly." The book is structured around 5 areas that you must master: (1) Industry; time is money, don't post-pone work, and remember that many small strokes, fell great oaks, (2) Self-reliance; can be summed up as "a life of leisure is a life of laziness", (3) Frugality; "a small leak will sink a great ship", or "When you bought one fine thing, you must buy ten more. It is easier to suppress the first desire than to satisfy all that follow", (4) Charity: Help others, (5) Experience: Quote from above sums it up, in other words, read and pursue new knowledge!

  11. 5 out of 5

    Brian Mikołajczyk

    Arguably Benjamin Franklin's most famous work, the Way to Wealth is a collection of the Almanack sayings of Poor Richard (a reoccurring character Franklin employs) about industriousness, frugality, and thriftiness. Many valuable lessons can be drawn from his personal finance philosophy. Arguably Benjamin Franklin's most famous work, the Way to Wealth is a collection of the Almanack sayings of Poor Richard (a reoccurring character Franklin employs) about industriousness, frugality, and thriftiness. Many valuable lessons can be drawn from his personal finance philosophy.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hunter McClure

    Some real protestant work ethic secular asceticism if I ever saw it.

  13. 4 out of 5

    8314

    Cordelia Flyte: If you weren't an agnostic, I should ask you for five shillings to buy a black goddaughter. Charles Ryder: Nothing will surprise me about your religion. Cordelia Flyte: It's a new thing the priests started last term. You send five bobs to some nuns in Africa, and they Christen a baby, and name her after you. I've got six black Cordelia's. Isn't that lovely? [...] Rex Mottram: I'll tell you another thing. They are in for a jolt financially if they don't look out. Charles Ryder: I thoug Cordelia Flyte: If you weren't an agnostic, I should ask you for five shillings to buy a black goddaughter. Charles Ryder: Nothing will surprise me about your religion. Cordelia Flyte: It's a new thing the priests started last term. You send five bobs to some nuns in Africa, and they Christen a baby, and name her after you. I've got six black Cordelia's. Isn't that lovely? [...] Rex Mottram: I'll tell you another thing. They are in for a jolt financially if they don't look out. Charles Ryder: I thought they were enormously rich. Rex Mottram: They are rich in the way that people are who just let their money sit quietly. Everyone of that sort's poorer than they were in 1914 and the Flyte don't seem to realize it. [...] Father Mowbray: Now I would like you to tell me what you yourself mean by prayer. Rex Mottram: Why, I don't mean anything. You tell me. Father Mowbray: Well, through prayer, every man, be he the most humble or the most exalted, is able to feel some sort of communion with God the Father to ask his forgiveness and to beg for his mercy. Rex Mottram: Right. Well, so much for prayer. What's the next thing? — Brideshead Revisited, by Evelyn Waugh Five stars only because it filled in a gap I've been wondering for ages. I kept coming back to Brideshead Revisited again and again this year. Finance for a religious cause versus finance for finance's sake stood in sharp contrast in the text. Something "ghastly and absolutely up-to-date, a tiny bit of Man pretending to be whole" was born, survived, thrived, and eventually worshiped as the successful entrepreneurs in this world. One could not help but wonder how this sort of stillborns (as Dostoyevsky's Notes from Underground precisely described) came about. Since when? In which way? I grabbed this book during my short field trip to Newport, and finished it while I was having lunch. Paragraphs of it reminded me of Rex Mottram, and of the observations made by Max Weber in Capitalism and Protestantism — who actually named Benjamin Franklin as a classical example of Protestant ethics, working for work's sake. However, Benjamin Franklin stroke me as somewhere in between Rex Mottram's banal secularism and Max Weber's characterization. He is certainly not secular, as the formality of the book is telling; but some spirit that is essential for any sort of religion was totally absent in his sermon. One could say Benjamin Franklin filled in the blank of the separation between religion and finance, in a way that is different from Adam Smith. Smith, being in the circle of Enlightenment and a close friend to David Hume, formulated his fundamental hypothesis on human nature in a totally Enlightenment manner (I'm perhaps the most peculiar person to insist that the most important chapter in the Wealth of Nations is actually Part III Article 2, on education; here one can see how Smith really thought about Homo Oeconomicus). Smith brushed religion off the table in the Wealth of Nations, yet his is not the kind of mind that had no potential of understanding transcendence. Franklin, on the other hand, as demonstrated in this pamphlet, understood not. Industry was everything to him; he found it totally acceptable to say an individual's dignity lies completely within his worldly acquisitions. Leisure is something to be despised; same with luxury or any extend of aesthetic pursuit. 'Silks and satins, scarlets and velvets, put out the kitchen fire', as Poor Richard says. These are not the necessaries of life ; they can scarcely be called conveniences: And yet only because they look pretty, how many want to have them? I walked down a road of blossoming spring, making my way to the cliff walk, wondering how ghastly this characterization of human nature is. To expel, to condemn, to deny any attempt in obtaining beauty. To turn one's back on Schiller's Aesthetic State once and for all. Cherry trees in bloom, golden daffodils by the cliff, shining white waves crashing on the shore — they said this is how Aphrodite was born — shall all be meaningless to such a person. Sublime and beauty, transcendence and anything higher than fleeting worldly glories shall elude him. What a trivial life it must have been. Perhaps Franklin shall refute like this: "Say whatever you want, but you still have taxes to pay and you are still poor and miserable." And he indeed made some interesting comments: We are taxed twice as much by our idleness, three times as much by our pride, and four times as much by our folly; and from these taxes the commissioners cannot ease or deliver us, by allowing an abatement. [...] Trusting too much to other's care is the ruin of many; for, 'In the affairs of this world, men are saved, not by faith, but by the want of it:' But a man's own care is profitable; for, 'If you would have a faithful servant and one that you like — serve yourself.' [...] What would you think of that prince, or of that government, who should issue an edict forbidding you to dress like a gentleman or gentlewoman, on pain of imprisonment or servitude? Would you not say you were free, have a right to dress as you please, and that such an edict would be a breach to your privileges, and such a government tyrannical? and yet you are about to put yourself under that tyranny, when you run in debt for such dress! The interplay-analogy between self-governance and governance in general is as straightforward as it can get. And yet the infinitely positive faith it has on the strength of ego, and reasoning — upon which these sermons are based — was totally non-Protestant. This is the disagreement I have against Max Weber. Franklin is the first sign of degeneration; a pliant man chopping some crucial dimensions of humanity off in order to live "healthy, wealthy and wise". And with an attitude like this, I could guess how Franklin behaved at the sight of Independence War. He didn't disappoint. I stood at the shore and watched the swelling and declining waves; mist on the sea moved by the wind gradually blurring the horizon; the golden daffodils shining under the April sun which might have struck Charles Ryder as "nothing but the golden daffodils seemed to be real". And I thought, thank this world, that nobody was taking his sermon seriously at the end of the book. The people heard it, and approved the doctrine, and immediately practiced the contrary, just as if it had been a common sermon; for the auction opened, and they began to buy extravagantly. There are more things in human than industry, than the illusion of an invincible ego that could just put whatever it willed to practice. Thank heaven for that.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Phat Nguyen

    Benjamin Franklin is undoubtedly one of the wisest man in his generation. This little book compose only a few pages, but deliver the wisdom of Ben about the rules to be wealthy. Even though these principles may seem simple and familiar, they are actually very much valuable, as this is the lessons learned by someone who was a genius in his ages. My only regret is that I was unable to understand all the proverbs Ben used in this book. I will definitely re-read it to gain a deeper understanding of t Benjamin Franklin is undoubtedly one of the wisest man in his generation. This little book compose only a few pages, but deliver the wisdom of Ben about the rules to be wealthy. Even though these principles may seem simple and familiar, they are actually very much valuable, as this is the lessons learned by someone who was a genius in his ages. My only regret is that I was unable to understand all the proverbs Ben used in this book. I will definitely re-read it to gain a deeper understanding of the content.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Henrik Haapala

    "Sloth makes all things difficult, but industry all easy, as Poor Richard says; and he that riseth late, must trot all day, and shall scarce overtake his business at night. While laziness travels so slowly, that poverty soon overtakes him, as we read in Poor Richard, who adds, drive thy business, let not that drive thee; and early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise." "Sloth makes all things difficult, but industry all easy, as Poor Richard says; and he that riseth late, must trot all day, and shall scarce overtake his business at night. While laziness travels so slowly, that poverty soon overtakes him, as we read in Poor Richard, who adds, drive thy business, let not that drive thee; and early to bed, and early to rise, makes a man healthy, wealthy and wise."

  16. 4 out of 5

    Katelyn Jenkins

    Pretty good. Don't take out loans and invest. Don't bite off more than you can chew. And work an honest days work. Good stuff from a well-learnt man. Full of quotes from Poor Richards Almanac, I figure Ben loved it, so I will read this next too! :) Pretty good. Don't take out loans and invest. Don't bite off more than you can chew. And work an honest days work. Good stuff from a well-learnt man. Full of quotes from Poor Richards Almanac, I figure Ben loved it, so I will read this next too! :)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Haley

    This was a read for school. While I do agree with the majority of Franklin’s sentiments on frugality, some seemed flawed and unreasonable. This was interesting to read however it has a lot of topics that could be debated on. 4 stars

  18. 5 out of 5

    Argawal

    Teaches values and principles to live by that will improve work ethic.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Senthil

    Best book on personal finance and success. After reading this I have decided that I am not going to read any other book on self-help/personal finance/success in my life time.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Miguel Limeres

    Clean,straight Straight forward, simple to follow,should be a most to read for high school students during summer session, it should explain more the benefits of saving

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brian Cox

    Great investment in yourself. Easy and enjoyable to read. Filled with wisdom. I'm excited to start focusing on the thirteen virtues and applying them to my daily life. Great investment in yourself. Easy and enjoyable to read. Filled with wisdom. I'm excited to start focusing on the thirteen virtues and applying them to my daily life.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carole Martell

    The workaholic's bible The workaholic's bible

  23. 4 out of 5

    Raphael Bernardo

    15 minute read but you get to hear Ben Franklin say 'No Pain, No Gain' and 'Can't teach a pig to fly' in old English. Good Shit. Read it. 15 minute read but you get to hear Ben Franklin say 'No Pain, No Gain' and 'Can't teach a pig to fly' in old English. Good Shit. Read it.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Will

    Quick read. Timeless advice. This book won't make you rich, but it can lead you along the right path. Quick read. Timeless advice. This book won't make you rich, but it can lead you along the right path.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Kholoud

    It is amazing how this book relates so much to our consumer mentality nowadays. It is very captivating and full of wisdom that is delivered in an amusing way.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Leoung

    Good thoughtful book Every concept is still applicable to these day "Industry and frugality." Readers spend little time to absorb important and practical idea. Good thoughtful book Every concept is still applicable to these day "Industry and frugality." Readers spend little time to absorb important and practical idea.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Narendrāditya Nalwa

    Be industrious and be free. Be frugal and be free.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Zachary Wrightsman

    A nice short book to follow up poor Richard’s almanack. I would say it goes in better detail of some of the sayings in poor Richards. However I would suggest reading the almanack first and then this book. Nice read

  29. 4 out of 5

    Soheil

    A short book with sound advice. But you can find all this in books such as Rich Dad Poor Dad or the Richest man in Babylon.

  30. 5 out of 5

    LeeTravelGoddess

    Good stuff.

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