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In a future, battle-ravaged New York City, a lone surviving Turtle embarks on a seemingly hopeless mission seeking justice for the family he lost. From legendary TMNT co-creators Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird. Get ready for the final story of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! TMNT co-creators Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird reunite for the first time in years to bring you the In a future, battle-ravaged New York City, a lone surviving Turtle embarks on a seemingly hopeless mission seeking justice for the family he lost. From legendary TMNT co-creators Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird. Get ready for the final story of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! TMNT co-creators Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird reunite for the first time in years to bring you the Turtles story three decades in the making! Who is the Last Ronin? What terrible events destroyed his family and left New York a crumbling, post-apocalyptic nightmare? All will be revealed in this climactic Turtle tale that sees longtime friends becoming enemies and new allies emerging in the most unexpected places. Can the surviving Turtle triumph? Eastman and Laird are joined by writer Tom Waltz, who penned the first 100 issues of IDW's ongoing TMNT series, and artists Esau & Isaac Escorza (Heavy Metal) and Ben Bishop (The Far Side of the Moon). Collects the complete five-issue miniseries in a new graphic novel, an adventure as fulfilling for longtime Turtles fans as it is accessible for readers just discovering the heroes in a half shell.


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In a future, battle-ravaged New York City, a lone surviving Turtle embarks on a seemingly hopeless mission seeking justice for the family he lost. From legendary TMNT co-creators Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird. Get ready for the final story of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! TMNT co-creators Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird reunite for the first time in years to bring you the In a future, battle-ravaged New York City, a lone surviving Turtle embarks on a seemingly hopeless mission seeking justice for the family he lost. From legendary TMNT co-creators Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird. Get ready for the final story of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles! TMNT co-creators Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird reunite for the first time in years to bring you the Turtles story three decades in the making! Who is the Last Ronin? What terrible events destroyed his family and left New York a crumbling, post-apocalyptic nightmare? All will be revealed in this climactic Turtle tale that sees longtime friends becoming enemies and new allies emerging in the most unexpected places. Can the surviving Turtle triumph? Eastman and Laird are joined by writer Tom Waltz, who penned the first 100 issues of IDW's ongoing TMNT series, and artists Esau & Isaac Escorza (Heavy Metal) and Ben Bishop (The Far Side of the Moon). Collects the complete five-issue miniseries in a new graphic novel, an adventure as fulfilling for longtime Turtles fans as it is accessible for readers just discovering the heroes in a half shell.

30 review for Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Last Ronin

  1. 5 out of 5

    A.J. Anders

    "We were always so different. So much alike. I miss my brothers. So much. And I miss my father. More than anything else, I wanted to make him proud. In the end...too little, too late. Story of my life." I usually don’t do re-reviews of books a little over a month after reading the single issues, but I already had the hardcover pre-ordered at my LCS and it ended up coming a week earlier than expected so this section will mainly be about the quality of that newly released hardcover for those intere "We were always so different. So much alike. I miss my brothers. So much. And I miss my father. More than anything else, I wanted to make him proud. In the end...too little, too late. Story of my life." I usually don’t do re-reviews of books a little over a month after reading the single issues, but I already had the hardcover pre-ordered at my LCS and it ended up coming a week earlier than expected so this section will mainly be about the quality of that newly released hardcover for those interested in it. I have nothing more to say on the quality of the story itself, so for those interested my full review of the series can be found down below. And after this reread, I still stand by everything I said in that initial review. As for the OHC (Oversized Hardcover) itself, I was surprised when this arrived, since it’s actually of pretty high quality. It’s one of the better hardcovers I’ve purchased recently, on top of being the most high-quality one IDW has ever printed by far. It makes sense, as this is their most popular book ever, but IDW’s hardcovers usually feel super cheap and have tons of issues (i.e. pages falling out, glue binding coming undone, etc.), so it was nice they actually spent money on this one! My main problem with recent hardcovers I’ve gotten this year (i.e. Batman Reptilian, Static Season One, and Strange Adventures) is there is always a cover break between issues, and believe me, I get why companies (mainly DC) do this, but it’s still super distracting and messes up the reading experience for me. I’ve always stated hardcovers like this should just have a cover gallery in the back and print the issues one after the other, so thank you IDW for doing exactly that with this book. Each issue flows into the next seamlessly, with the reader being able to tell when the next issue is up by title cards at the start of each issue. The book starts with an introduction from Robert Rodriguez, and finishes with an afterword from Kevin Eastman. Both of those are good, but Kevin Eastman’s is clearly the better of the two since this project was years in the making for him and he takes the time to thank his collaborators for their hard work over the years. There’s also a cover gallery in the back featuring all of the main covers and a select few variants. I do wish they had a couple more variants and extras printed in here, like some of the sketches from the Design Archive issue, but this is still great. I would recommend stretching the spine before reading the book itself though, especially since the spine is sewn together and not glued. Sewn binding is better than glue any day of the week, but you don’t want to mess up your nice binding either by not breaking it in properly, so just stretch it out like you would any omnibus. The book itself is about half an inch taller than the other IDW TMNT Hardcovers, but it also doesn’t seem to have problems with pages falling out like those OHCs did. I’ll update this review if that at all changes though. The only negative I can think of is the slight gutter loss, but that isn't too big of a deal saying there aren't tons of splash pages throughout this. This hardcover is an easy recommendation for longtime fans of TMNT, and worth buying at cover price for said fans. Fans of the IDW ongoing should also pull the trigger on this hardcover. It’s done by the same creative team and looks great next to the other TMNT OHCs, even if it’s half an inch taller than them. Newcomers should be able to find something enjoyable out of this book, but maybe wait for a sale before diving into this one if you are more on the fence about the Turtles. Either way, this is a fantastic hardcover collection that is well worth any TMNT fans' time at the $30 cover price. DISCLAIMER: This spiel above was written after having reread the series again in the newly released hardcover. The original review can be found below: In a future NYC far different from the one we know today, the last surviving Turtle goes on a seemingly hopeless mission to obtain justice for his fallen family and friends. Spanning decades, Kevin Eastman & Peter Laird finally reunite on a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle comic to explore what exactly happened all those years ago to set the Ronin on this quest for vengeance, as horrors of the past are slowly revealed and we begin to discover what happened to lead to this nightmarish future. Will the Ronin be able to find some measure of peace, or is he fated to meet the same end as his brothers? The main talking point (i think?) about this story is that, as I mentioned before, Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird reunite (kinda?) to tell a TMNT story they have been waiting to share for years, and thankfully it is actually good. For those who aren’t aware, Eastman and Laird had a pretty bad falling out years ago and stopped speaking to each other for a while. It wasn’t until that Netflix show “The Toys that Made Us” that they finally got back on speaking terms, and at some point, Eastman decided to revive one of their lost pitches for an, and I quote, “Limited Edition Hardcover Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles GN”. The first two pages for said pitch are actually available to read for anyone who grabs the Director’s Cut of this story’s first issue, and it is a treat. It’s WILDLY different from the final product we got here, with it being set 30 years after a confrontation between Raph and Splinter that ended with Raphael beating the shit out of Splinter, who then goes to die in Japan as the turtles end up going their separate ways until they are called back together by April and Honeycutt, who has been warned of impending doom from a dying Casey Jones. Obviously, some elements stay in from that, but this story as a whole was clearly overhauled drastically. And just a warning for those wanting to read this for Peter Laird’s involvement, don’t get your hopes up too much, as he was barely involved in the creative process besides giving the team his blessing to look at his outline from ‘87. Peter Laird sadly isn’t all that into either TMNT or comic books in general anymore, hence why his only input in the story was his insanely detailed pitch, so Kevin Eastman and Tom Waltz, the duo behind the first 100 issues of IDW’s TMNT ongoing series, ended up coming up with a reworked story using elements from Laird’s pitch. I will admit, it does suck Laird doesn’t script anything here, but it’s still so great seeing the two creators of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles on the same book again, even if Laird’s input was minimal at most. The Story and Art: Eastman & Waltz script all five issues and they are joined by a plethora of artists, with Esau Escorza & Isaac Escorza handling the pencils and inks, Ben Bishop helping on fill-in pages, coloring handled by Luis Antonio Delgado and Ronda Pattison, with Samuel Plata helping on colors when needed, and as always, Kevin Eastman handling layouts. Eastman also does both the pencils and inks for certain sequences that I won’t spoil here, and it’s awesome to see his work in a Turtles book again. It helps that it’s all very well done and fits perfectly within the context of the story. The rest of the art is fucking incredible too, with tons of detail filling up every single panel. Action scenes are spaced out nearly perfectly, as everything is easy-to-follow, and the artists make good use of this being a Mature Readers only series. None of the violence is anything too graphic, but it definitely earns its mature rating through its brutal action scenes. The first and last issues deal entirely with the dystopian future, while the middle three issues chronicle how each of the other turtles and allies met their fate in the past. They are all gut-wrenching deaths that will be sure to crush long-time fans of the series, and each one feels like the proper way each of the turtles/allies would go out. I have seen some discussion that the turtle's deaths were “weak”, but they furthered the plot in a meaningful way, made sense in regard to how each turtle acts, and thankfully aren’t too gratuitous. I think they were fine but to each their own. The future NYC that is depicted is also pretty awesome and well-thought-out, with the Design Archive and Director’s Cut for #1 actually detailing how the creative team came up with all this. My favorite part of this future has to be all the weird-ass Mousers that come from it, as they are some of the wildest versions of those creatures I have ever seen. The artists do an amazing job with rendering each one, and everything I said about their work in the last category still stands. Eastman's layouts are great and all, but this story works so well because this team of pencilers and colorists are doing an incredible job of bringing this dystopian NYC to life. Gripes: While I love this book, it isn’t perfect by any means, with my two main criticisms being the release schedule of the individual issues and the main villain. I can’t deny that the constant delays didn’t take the steam out of this book, because they did. It took close to two years for 5 issues to come out, but thankfully the series manages to live up to the hype of said wait, for me at least. I know some who feel this book kinda just landed flat when it should have been something bigger, and that's completely fine to have that opinion, but I do think the hardcover coming out soon will change things up for some. Reading this all in one go is definitely the best way to experience this story. The main complaint I have with this whole book is the villain, Oroku Hiroto, grandson of Shredder and son of Karai, as he really isn’t all that strong of an antagonist. I mean, he gets the job done and makes the most sense in the context of the story, but he just can’t match the heights of other TMNT rogues like Shredder, Krang, or even Rat King. I think the best comparison I can make is this character is very similar to Neil Kandy (Kandy Welding Co. dude) from El Camino: A Breaking Bad movie. Just like Hiroto, Neil gets the job done as the antagonist in the sense that he is the next logical foe for our protagonist to face off against, and he admittedly works fine in the context of the story and does in fact have a fucking sweet final showdown against Jesse Pinkman by the end, but he just isn’t nearly as engaging as someone like Lalo Salamanca, Gus Fring, or even Jack Welker and his Neo-Nazi gang. Like he works well enough, but he just didn’t have that extra oomph that really makes a villain memorable and enthralling. And that’s all Hiroto Saki was: just okay, like Neil from El Camino. Like Neil, Hiroto makes sense as the next logical foe for the Ronin to fight, and also does end up having a fucking sweet final showdown against the Last Ronin, but that’s about all he was good for. Hiroto’s monologues were pretty corny and just too much at times, with one is issue #3 specifically that made me roll my eyes a bit. You can tell they are going for a cross between King Joffrey from Game of Thrones and Commodus from Gladiator, but he just isn’t nearly as compelling as either of those characters and just comes across as a crazy asshole drunk on power. Final Thoughts: Weak main villain and choppy release schedule aside, this is easily one of the best Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles stories anyone can read. Even with its flaws, It’s such a solid story with kick-ass action, well-done emotional moments that will tug on the hearts of many, and an ending that is both satisfying on its own terms while also promising interesting developments down the line. This, as mostly everyone has said already, is the equivalent to Old Man Logan and TDKR for TMNT comics, and I’d recommend it to both old fans of TMNT and those who are new to the franchise. I think there is something here that new readers who have never touched a TMNT book can find some enjoyment out of, while those who have read the Mirage/Image/IDW runs or grew up watching the shows/movies will get potentially even more out of it. I hope this selling insanely well leads to more of these standalone TMNT stories in the vein of something like Black Label that DC has. Other TMNT Recommendations: If you are looking for more TMNT stories in a similar vein as this one, I’d recommend Soul’s Winter, Return to New York, or City at War. There also have technically been Last Ronin-esque stories in TMNT comics before, but they are very different from what we got here. The Tales of the TMNT Vol 1. Treasury Edition has an epilogue story to the last issue showing a blind Donatello alone in the future mourning the loss of his brothers, while Jim Lawson’s Vol 2. Mirage run shows a future where a mystery turtle has killed Splinter, and eventually, certain issues of the Vol. 2 run of Tales of the TMNT would show brief glimpses into other possible futures. If anyone wants to read those issues, they are in Tales of the TMNT (Vol 2.) #13-14, 25, 38, 40, 41, 45, 55, 69. And if you want more future turtles, you can check out Michelangelo Christmas Special, Plastron Cafe #1, and Puma Blues #20, which all have some cool glimpses into the future of the Mirage turtles. There’s even a fan comic, TMNT: Odyssey, by Andrew Modeen and longtime TMNT artist Jim Lawson, which is technically a sequel to the Mirage volumes that sees all the futuristic turtles from the Tales I mentioned earlier go on a multiversal adventure together. I haven’t read it in a while, but I remember it being really fun, and it should be available to read online for free to anyone interested.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    A really good series. It's a return to the dark, gritty tone of the original Eastman and Laird comics. Set in the future, only one Turtle is still alive. We don't know which one at first as he now wears a black mask and carries all his brothers weapons in addition to his own. I like how the surviving brother has went eccentric and talks to his brothers. The story is very action oriented with flashbacks throughout the middle issues detailing what happened to the rest of the Hamato Clan. The only A really good series. It's a return to the dark, gritty tone of the original Eastman and Laird comics. Set in the future, only one Turtle is still alive. We don't know which one at first as he now wears a black mask and carries all his brothers weapons in addition to his own. I like how the surviving brother has went eccentric and talks to his brothers. The story is very action oriented with flashbacks throughout the middle issues detailing what happened to the rest of the Hamato Clan. The only part that was a slight letdown was the villain. He was kind of generic. I wasn't familiar with the Escorza brothers' art before, but it was fantastic. Kevin Eastman draws some of the flashback sequences too.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Set in a dystopian future where a major city is ruled over by thugs, the elderly but legendary hero returns for one last adventure - one last gasp to stand up to evil. Joining him is a young female sidekick, representing the future of justice - can the two of them bring hope to a bleak world? This is Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Turtle Knight Returns! That really is the concept behind The Last Ronin - a hackneyed TMNT version of Frank Miller’s mid-’80s Batman classic, The Dark Knight Return Set in a dystopian future where a major city is ruled over by thugs, the elderly but legendary hero returns for one last adventure - one last gasp to stand up to evil. Joining him is a young female sidekick, representing the future of justice - can the two of them bring hope to a bleak world? This is Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Turtle Knight Returns! That really is the concept behind The Last Ronin - a hackneyed TMNT version of Frank Miller’s mid-’80s Batman classic, The Dark Knight Returns. They even have a tank-like vehicle in the final act! Oy, it’s such a bad comic. And not for trying - and failing - to ape such a famous book, but because the story itself is so stilted and dull. I’ve gotta go into SPOILERS for this nonsense guys, so there’s the warning. Really don’t waste your time with this crap though. Manhattan is turned into a fortress - the walls are to combat the rising sea level, though we actually see nothing of the sort. But why is the US government seeding control of its largest, most iconic city with the most expensive real estate in the country to a Japanese cartoon supervillain??! It’s never explained and it’s representative of the shoddy world-building offered throughout. The cartoonish supervillain in question is Hiroto, Shredder’s grandson, who does embarrassing things like monologuing in the rain and laughing maniacally to prove what a cliched bad guy he is. If you didn’t get how bad a bad guy he is, he appears in a robe via hologram to the citizens of New York a la Palpatine. Get it - he’s a VILLAIN, duuuuuuhhhh! Hiroto’s just there for Mikey, the titular last ronin, to defeat because his brothers and father are dead, which we get via flashbacks - unimaginatively, they died fighting the enemies they’ve always fought, but lost to this time, because contrivance. It’s all to force a dark tone that’s never earned - but hey, that’s the tone of TDKR, right?? It really feels like if Zack Snyder were to write a Turtles comic, this would be the laughable end result. It’s so riveting, reading pages of mindless action as Mikey throws himself at faceless legions of Foot Clan. What a memorable story - Turtles v Foot Clan. Never seen that before. Why did all of this happen - where’s Mikey been for 16 years? Up a mountain, meditating. Bravo. What ingenious storytelling. Golf claps all round. April O’Neil’s also in this. She can do medical procedures, build anything, and is also an accomplished scientist in this book, all because the totally well-thought-out story needs her to do these things because there’s no-one else to do them. She was a journalist originally, wasn’t she…? Oh but anyone can become a doctor engineer scientist in no time guys, you just gotta move into the sewers and then it all magically happens. I’m not a big Turtles fan so I didn’t get all the fanservice - like the robot thing at the end - but I remember Baxter Stockman. Another well-rounded thoughtful character… Just kidding. He’s ranting and raving like a mad scientist until he’s not. It really is such a predictable story. Everything you think will happen happens, and in the least interesting ways. I appreciated the art team showing the different looks of the Turtles over the years, from the gritty mono-colour early years to the more colourful cartoony versions when they became world-famous to the darker, more adult looks they adopt in Mikey’s memory as he talks to them in the present. The art doesn’t make the book any more compelling to read though and I was never the least bit interested in reading this childishly-rendered story that tries too hard to be dark and adult and falls far short of it because the writers simply aren’t up to the task. Boring and silly throughout, The Last Ronin isn’t just bad but it shows how limited this franchise is too.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    Sixteen years ago, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles had their final battle with The Foot Clan and lost. Now, the last Turtle is back and looking for payback... I'm not the world's biggest Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle fan, but I was into the cartoon, the movies, and the Archie books in the late 1980s/early 1990s. People were talking this up on Twitter so I nabbed it. Aside from some garbanzo spoiling the reveal of which Turtle The Last Ronin was, I enjoyed this quite a bit. Set in a dystopian future Sixteen years ago, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles had their final battle with The Foot Clan and lost. Now, the last Turtle is back and looking for payback... I'm not the world's biggest Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle fan, but I was into the cartoon, the movies, and the Archie books in the late 1980s/early 1990s. People were talking this up on Twitter so I nabbed it. Aside from some garbanzo spoiling the reveal of which Turtle The Last Ronin was, I enjoyed this quite a bit. Set in a dystopian future where the Foot Clan controls New York, the last of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles connects with some old friends and gears up for the final showdown with Iroku Hiroto, grandson of the Shredder. The writing by Tom Waltz is poignant for a book about a humanoid turtle walking around kicking ass. I haven't read any of the IDW TMNT books but felt right at home. I felt sadness at the loss of Splinter and the other three turtles and a growing anticipation for the final battle with Iroku Hiroto. The art by Esau & Isaac Escorza, Ben Bishop, and Luis Antonio Delgado was moody as hell. It was obviously computer colored but the coloring suited the story very well and wasn't overdone like I find a lot of computer coloring these days. My only gripes with the book are that I found the storytelling a little awkward in places. There were a few times I had to reread a page or two to figure out what exactly I was looking at. I also thought the final battle could have been a little longer and Iroku Hiroto could have been a little more fleshed out. Overall, it was a great book, though. Four out of five nunchaku.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Khurram

    I love everything about this book. The hardcover, embossed picture at the front, the story, the different artworks all used at the right time and the action. I have been a Turtles fan since they were released as the Teenage Mutant Hero Turtles I'm the UK. I have not like every incarnation of them (the Nickelodeon versions I did not like). I loved the bigger badder more Ninja version of them. I was slightly dissapointed in City at War, when I saw this advertised I though it looked cool but I was I love everything about this book. The hardcover, embossed picture at the front, the story, the different artworks all used at the right time and the action. I have been a Turtles fan since they were released as the Teenage Mutant Hero Turtles I'm the UK. I have not like every incarnation of them (the Nickelodeon versions I did not like). I loved the bigger badder more Ninja version of them. I was slightly dissapointed in City at War, when I saw this advertised I though it looked cool but I was dubious. Does this deliver yes it does!!! The war between the Oroku/Foot and Hamato Clans has spanned generations. Now the last surviving member of the Hamato family had come gor revenge on the lady Oroku and his army. It has been 16 years since the Hamato's were decimated. Making the last survivor a Ronin. What happened to his family? Where has he been? Can he do it alone? On a personal not this has always been my faverite Turtle, so I was extra glad he got the spotlight. Though the others also have their moments in the flashbacks. This is has become my all time faverite Turtles story. There are different artists and artwork on display for different parts of the story and they are blended together perfectly. The book starts the a great introduction by Robert Rodriguez, finishes with an awesome afterwards original creater Kevin Eastman, and a full page cover gallery with varient covers. Which era of TMNT fan you are this is must have. I think every character was done justice. I am a happy fan.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Michael Hicks

    It's been a number of years since I've read a Ninja Turtles comic. I wore out the trade volumes of Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird's original run as a kid back in the 80s, but didn't touch another Turtles book until the incredibly disappointing Image Comics reboot in the mid-90s under a new creative team. Thanks to Netflix, though, my kids are discovering the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles for themselves and wanting my wife and I to introduce them to the movies we grew up with. I decided after so ma It's been a number of years since I've read a Ninja Turtles comic. I wore out the trade volumes of Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird's original run as a kid back in the 80s, but didn't touch another Turtles book until the incredibly disappointing Image Comics reboot in the mid-90s under a new creative team. Thanks to Netflix, though, my kids are discovering the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles for themselves and wanting my wife and I to introduce them to the movies we grew up with. I decided after so many decades away, it was time to re-familiarize myself once more. The Last Ronin is a perfect blast of nostalgia, and it feels apiece with the Eastman and Laird stuff I grew up with. For pretty good reason, too, it turns out. Back when they were working together in the 80s, they crafted this storyline as the end for their then-brand-new creations. Reminiscent now of titles like Old Man Logan, The Last Ronin is set several decades down the road, in a dystopian future, where only one Turtle remains and has sworn vengeance against the man who slaughtered his brothers - Oroku Hiroto, Shredder's grandson. While it may not be the most unique and original premise ever nowadays, Eastman and co-writer Tom Waltz certainly give it plenty of heart and darkness to ensure it packs a lot of oomph. As with their first issue, this "last" Ninja Turtles story is dedicated to Jack Kirby and Frank Miller, and you can feel their fingerprints in the Turtles's mutated DNA. This is their Dark Knight Returns, and much like their original 80s run, there's a downright Miller-esque grittiness on each and every page that belies the more well-known, kid-friendly overtures of the Ninja Turtles in popular media. What the heck was it with Hollywood in the 80s, anyway? Taking all these very much not at all aimed at children properties and turning them into pop culture icons? Neither Robocop and Rambo were meant for the kiddos, but both somehow had their own cartoons and action figures! Ditto the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, which certainly sounded kid-friendly until you cracked open the book and found yourself surprised that they were violent warriors far more interested in ending the blood feud between their Master Splinter's Hamato Clan and the Oroku's Foot Clan than they ever gave any kind of a damn at all about pizza and cracking wise. The Last Ronin is, plain and simple, a samurai revenge story. And quite a melancholy one at that. Eastman and Waltz make you feel each loss, and the passage of each year. It's awfully depressing to see so many of these characters you grew up with suffer and die tragically, over the span of decades as the Oroku's reopen old feuds in order to wipe out the mutants. Sad, but all the more effective for it. Fair warning, by the way, if you do let your young, impressionable kids read it, be prepared to have to explain what seppuku is!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Stanley

    Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Last Ronin collects issues 1-5 of the IDW Comic series written by Kevin Eastman and Tom Waltz with art by Esau and Isaac Escorial, Ben Bishop, and Kevin Eastman. In a dark future New York City is ruled over by Oroku Hiroto (The grandson of Shredder) and The Foot Clan. Out of the shadow appears The Ronin, the last of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles who will do anything to avenge his fallen brothers. The Last Ronin is very dark and reminiscent of the original Mir Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Last Ronin collects issues 1-5 of the IDW Comic series written by Kevin Eastman and Tom Waltz with art by Esau and Isaac Escorial, Ben Bishop, and Kevin Eastman. In a dark future New York City is ruled over by Oroku Hiroto (The grandson of Shredder) and The Foot Clan. Out of the shadow appears The Ronin, the last of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles who will do anything to avenge his fallen brothers. The Last Ronin is very dark and reminiscent of the original Mirage series. This book doesn’t have your your usual Turtle’s hijinks and comedy and the fighting action is brutal. While I really liked the story, I felt the middle dragged and was a bit repetitive. The main villain is also a bit weak and generic and it would have been better to see Shredder at the end. The art is strong throughout with Eastman even providing some flashback scenes. The hardcover edition is nice. It is presented with oversized art, thick pages, and sturdy sewn binding. This will be a book that you will be able to reread many times and not fear it falling apart. The is the first Turtles book I have read in many years and it definitely makes me want to get back into the IDW Turtles series. I had read up to issue 55 and it was fantastic. The TMNT were one one of the first superhero groups I became obsessed with due to great Saturday morning cartoon series and the original live-action movie (Which still holds up incredibly well today). It’s great to see the Turtles still doing well today and evolving to meet the needs of this generation’s kids. Cowabunga forever!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    IDW’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Last Ronin serves as a coda of sorts for the Mirage comics, which will delight that particular fanbase. Based on an unused idea by Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird from decades ago – hence making it the first IDW title crediting Laird’s participation – the story takes place in a future, battle-ravaged New York City, controlled by the Foot Clan, where a lone surviving Turtle embarks on a seemingly hopeless mission seeking justice for the family he lost. Please IDW’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: The Last Ronin serves as a coda of sorts for the Mirage comics, which will delight that particular fanbase. Based on an unused idea by Kevin Eastman and Peter Laird from decades ago – hence making it the first IDW title crediting Laird’s participation – the story takes place in a future, battle-ravaged New York City, controlled by the Foot Clan, where a lone surviving Turtle embarks on a seemingly hopeless mission seeking justice for the family he lost. Please click here for my full review.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ronald

    This was entertaining, a nice throwback to the early days of the TMNT. The story might lean a little to much on hitting the nostalgia emotion. The flashbacks to a time when the turtles had allies was kind of weird, like armies backing them for all the good it did. The main story was a basic Samurai / Ninja revenge story. It was a good read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    My video review - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wG1tC... But if don't want to watch it, this is a GREAT TMNT comic. With a couple of pacing issues aside, this is a excellent final storyline for most of our heroes, great art, and well worth reading for long time fans and new fans alike. A 4.5 out of 5. My video review - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wG1tC... But if don't want to watch it, this is a GREAT TMNT comic. With a couple of pacing issues aside, this is a excellent final storyline for most of our heroes, great art, and well worth reading for long time fans and new fans alike. A 4.5 out of 5.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chris Rumsey

    I would probably give this a 4.5, I'm glad I waited for the full hardcover edition as with the delays of the individual issues it would have absolutely killed any momentum the story has and this absolutely has to be read in one go. Beautiful artwork all round with some great throwback art pages to the original mirage days. The reason for the lack of 5 stars is the lackluster villain, he doesn't feel close to being an epic villain which this story deserves and overall I'd have liked to have gone m I would probably give this a 4.5, I'm glad I waited for the full hardcover edition as with the delays of the individual issues it would have absolutely killed any momentum the story has and this absolutely has to be read in one go. Beautiful artwork all round with some great throwback art pages to the original mirage days. The reason for the lack of 5 stars is the lackluster villain, he doesn't feel close to being an epic villain which this story deserves and overall I'd have liked to have gone more in-depth into the last Ronin before this main story begins.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alby Scout

    This hit me right in the childhood! Growing up loving Ninja Turtles I had to read this! It was way darker and way too realistic, but in such a good way. The ending really got me and I loved the epilogue!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Believe the hype, this is the perfect bookend to the Turtles' Eastman and Laird origin story, with generous nods to the entire gamut of continuity from 1986 until present day. Believe the hype, this is the perfect bookend to the Turtles' Eastman and Laird origin story, with generous nods to the entire gamut of continuity from 1986 until present day.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Dusty

    Very good story from the OG creators. Its a book about legacy and family. The book is for life long fans or those who only know the basics... like there are four turtles who are mutants and know martial arts. It puts a bow on their story while opening new doors to the future.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Dean Thomas

    Read the original issues as they came out, not this compilation specifically. Although my understanding is they didn't change anything between them. Great book! Highly recommended for TMNT fans old and new. A great "capstone" on the original Mirage run that we never really got. Read the original issues as they came out, not this compilation specifically. Although my understanding is they didn't change anything between them. Great book! Highly recommended for TMNT fans old and new. A great "capstone" on the original Mirage run that we never really got.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alex

    I wondered if I would have liked this more if I was caught up in the hype of it. It almost felt like two or three different ideas for a story mashed into one, like they wrote the first two issues, and then had to pivot for the later ones and those delays. It almost comes off like a poor man's Dark Knight Rises, I got a lot of Miller in here. It's more neat as a concept than a actual story, it's pretty too the point. I wondered if I would have liked this more if I was caught up in the hype of it. It almost felt like two or three different ideas for a story mashed into one, like they wrote the first two issues, and then had to pivot for the later ones and those delays. It almost comes off like a poor man's Dark Knight Rises, I got a lot of Miller in here. It's more neat as a concept than a actual story, it's pretty too the point.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Blackberrystew

    This was extremely good but also :'( This was extremely good but also :'(

  18. 5 out of 5

    Martin O'Hara

    Incredible. Having not been a huge TMNT guy growing up but vaguely familiar, this was powerful, well written and incredibly well drawn. Would make for a great one-shot movie ala Logan if done correctly.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Marinalouise Herrera-Goldman

    I loved the ending of this. Even though it was a bit dark it was great to see them back together again.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Malum

    Great elseworlds-type Ninja Turtle story about the last living Ninja Turtle trying to kill Shredder's grandson. The last Ninja Turtles comics that I read (except for dipping my toes into the very first issues of the original run a year or two ago) was from the Archie run when I was a whippersnapper in the late 80s, and I remember those being pretty tame. It was fun and surprising to see people being decapitated and disemboweled left and right in this story. Even as a kid I thought it was weird t Great elseworlds-type Ninja Turtle story about the last living Ninja Turtle trying to kill Shredder's grandson. The last Ninja Turtles comics that I read (except for dipping my toes into the very first issues of the original run a year or two ago) was from the Archie run when I was a whippersnapper in the late 80s, and I remember those being pretty tame. It was fun and surprising to see people being decapitated and disemboweled left and right in this story. Even as a kid I thought it was weird that people that ran around swinging swords and knives at people never really hurt anybody (I'm looking at you, too, He-Man and Thundercats). I'll definitely be checking out more IDW Ninja Turtle books in the future.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Hugo

    A series whose hype was impossible to live up to, and this does not. It's not the reunion of Eastman and Laird, it's not as cool as their original pitch, the art isn't as striking as Andy Kuhn's original pages, and it falls down narratively (the central mystery of identity of this turtle is dispensed with summarily early on, and the antagonist is full of bluster but lacks any depth or menace). But it's TMNT in the style of The Dark Knight Returns or Terminator: Salvation and I enjoyed it despite A series whose hype was impossible to live up to, and this does not. It's not the reunion of Eastman and Laird, it's not as cool as their original pitch, the art isn't as striking as Andy Kuhn's original pages, and it falls down narratively (the central mystery of identity of this turtle is dispensed with summarily early on, and the antagonist is full of bluster but lacks any depth or menace). But it's TMNT in the style of The Dark Knight Returns or Terminator: Salvation and I enjoyed it despite its various flaws, because I've been with these daft characters since 1989 and I'm silly like that.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    Good, at times very good, but it's hard to shake the feeling that it could have been great. The series is a bit too derivative of Dark Knight Returns and other dystopian comic and sci-fi tales that have come before. It's really cool that the Turtles have their own "last story" after all these years but that story seldom feels as unique as the characters starring in it. Also, the central villain just does not hold a candle to so many of the baddies the Turtles have faced throughout the years. He's Good, at times very good, but it's hard to shake the feeling that it could have been great. The series is a bit too derivative of Dark Knight Returns and other dystopian comic and sci-fi tales that have come before. It's really cool that the Turtles have their own "last story" after all these years but that story seldom feels as unique as the characters starring in it. Also, the central villain just does not hold a candle to so many of the baddies the Turtles have faced throughout the years. He's not interesting or even very threatening and can't help but drag things down whenever he appears. With a few original spins on heavily-used dystopian tropes, as well as an antagonist worthy of a final epic battle, this miniseries could have been one of the all-time great TMNT sagas. As it is, it's a fun read but one that feels a little hollow when it's over.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Chase B

    Near future NYC and only one Ninja Turtle is left and he is on a path of vengeance until he runs into an old friend. He is guided by the teachings in the journal of his sensi and father figure, Master Splinter. Soon he finds himself leading the resistance movement against the man responsible for the loss of the Turtles and others, Oroku Hiroto, the grandson of Oroku Saki aka Shredder. This was simply one of the best graphic novels I have read in a long time if not ever. Truly loved it for the st Near future NYC and only one Ninja Turtle is left and he is on a path of vengeance until he runs into an old friend. He is guided by the teachings in the journal of his sensi and father figure, Master Splinter. Soon he finds himself leading the resistance movement against the man responsible for the loss of the Turtles and others, Oroku Hiroto, the grandson of Oroku Saki aka Shredder. This was simply one of the best graphic novels I have read in a long time if not ever. Truly loved it for the story, character arcs, and nostalgia for sure. If you ever were a fan of TMNT, pick this up.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kent

    I expected more artwork by Eastman. My mistake for failing to research it better. It was...okay. I don't feel it lived up to the hype. The artwork especially. More time should have been spent on designing the turtles mature form. It just looked odd. 3 stars is basically just because it's the Ninja Turtles. I expected more artwork by Eastman. My mistake for failing to research it better. It was...okay. I don't feel it lived up to the hype. The artwork especially. More time should have been spent on designing the turtles mature form. It just looked odd. 3 stars is basically just because it's the Ninja Turtles.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Anthony R.

    Everything about this mini series was amazing- story, artwork, writing all great! Even if you’re not necessarily a TMNT fan but enjoy post apocalyptic sci fi stories you will enjoy this!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rob Schamberger

    A cool Dark Knight Returns approach to the Turtles. The gorgeous, dynamic art really makes it sing.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This was just so good. I haven’t consumed much Turtles media (besides being a kid in the 90’s) and certainly have never read any comics, but this tugged at my heartstrings in surprising and poignant ways. A delightful surprise.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Devin Perez

    This is an absolute stunning piece. Officially, my favorite TMNT graphic novel and probably in my Top 5 Graphic Novels of All Time. “Know Peace”…very heavy advice for Casey from Mikey.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Irionik

    One of the best TMNT stories so far...

  30. 5 out of 5

    Derek

    It's hard to explain how special this feels within the context of TMNT, an IP so malleable it can have a saturday morning cartoon on one end and this on the other. Edgelord versions of comic characters have been all the rage forever, but this feels like it has some real heart behind it and isn't just some nihilistic nightmare to attract the cool kids. Love the pacing and the structure, a great example of what comics can be, I struggle to see this being as rad in any other medium. It's hard to explain how special this feels within the context of TMNT, an IP so malleable it can have a saturday morning cartoon on one end and this on the other. Edgelord versions of comic characters have been all the rage forever, but this feels like it has some real heart behind it and isn't just some nihilistic nightmare to attract the cool kids. Love the pacing and the structure, a great example of what comics can be, I struggle to see this being as rad in any other medium.

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