website statistics Superman '78 - PDF Books Online
Hot Best Seller

Superman '78

Availability: Ready to download

DC follows the very successful Batman '66 with the new Superman '78, inspired by the Man of Steel's movie adventures starring Christopher Reeve. In the late 1970s moviegoers were thrilled by the words "You'll believe a man can fly!," which introduced actor Christopher Reeve as the silver screen's charming new Man of Steel. These adventures are set in a world where superhero DC follows the very successful Batman '66 with the new Superman '78, inspired by the Man of Steel's movie adventures starring Christopher Reeve. In the late 1970s moviegoers were thrilled by the words "You'll believe a man can fly!," which introduced actor Christopher Reeve as the silver screen's charming new Man of Steel. These adventures are set in a world where superheroes are strange, thrilling, and romantic. These stories, written by comics veteran Robert Venditti (Hawkman, Green Lantern, Justice League) with crisply drawn art by Wilfredo Torres, feature colorful villains like Brainiac and Lex Luthor, as well as the heroism of Superman and the determined grit of reporter Lois Lane. Collects the first 12 chapters of the Superman '78 digital comics series.


Compare

DC follows the very successful Batman '66 with the new Superman '78, inspired by the Man of Steel's movie adventures starring Christopher Reeve. In the late 1970s moviegoers were thrilled by the words "You'll believe a man can fly!," which introduced actor Christopher Reeve as the silver screen's charming new Man of Steel. These adventures are set in a world where superhero DC follows the very successful Batman '66 with the new Superman '78, inspired by the Man of Steel's movie adventures starring Christopher Reeve. In the late 1970s moviegoers were thrilled by the words "You'll believe a man can fly!," which introduced actor Christopher Reeve as the silver screen's charming new Man of Steel. These adventures are set in a world where superheroes are strange, thrilling, and romantic. These stories, written by comics veteran Robert Venditti (Hawkman, Green Lantern, Justice League) with crisply drawn art by Wilfredo Torres, feature colorful villains like Brainiac and Lex Luthor, as well as the heroism of Superman and the determined grit of reporter Lois Lane. Collects the first 12 chapters of the Superman '78 digital comics series.

30 review for Superman '78

  1. 4 out of 5

    Subham

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This was such a good volume! It takes place in the movie continuity of 70s superman and its so well done like Brainiac is invading Metropolis and well Superman on the scene to save his city and when his drones become too much and his threat high, Superman agrees to go with him to save his city but Lex and his transmitter of Alpha waves hidden and well there he is shrinked and sent to Kandor where he meets his parents and its so well written and its quite different from normal Superman stories whi This was such a good volume! It takes place in the movie continuity of 70s superman and its so well done like Brainiac is invading Metropolis and well Superman on the scene to save his city and when his drones become too much and his threat high, Superman agrees to go with him to save his city but Lex and his transmitter of Alpha waves hidden and well there he is shrinked and sent to Kandor where he meets his parents and its so well written and its quite different from normal Superman stories which makes this even better. Superman seeing that Brainiac will invade Earth anyhow spends last moment with his parents and assures them of stuff, gives them hope and well reverse-minitiaurization and all and its Superman vs Brainiac with Metropolis on the line and can he save the day? Ofcourse he does and this was so well written and makes you love Superman even more and sure this story has been told a lot of times but its this stuff that is a stand out for him, the whole look and aesthetic of the 70s is felt here, Superman is written very well and the villains motivations and all are right on point, Lois the romance plot, Lex the intelligent egomaniac and the big threat of the alien, Metropolis in threat and Superman on the scene to save it all! Its really well written and just shows how well Venditti knows these characters and he does an excellent job with them and truly makes it feel like an epic movie. The art is great and reason why this book looks and feels so epic.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bill

    My wife & I recently went to the Royal Albert Hall in London to see the film Superman (1978) with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra playing the music live. It was a briliant night out & the release of this new Superman comic was perfect timing. Long time Superman fan Robert Venditti brings us a brand new adventure featuring the cast of the classic 1978 film starring Christopher Reeve (to me the best ever Clark Kent & Superman) along with Gene Hackman, Margot Kidder & many others. Brainiac (first s My wife & I recently went to the Royal Albert Hall in London to see the film Superman (1978) with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra playing the music live. It was a briliant night out & the release of this new Superman comic was perfect timing. Long time Superman fan Robert Venditti brings us a brand new adventure featuring the cast of the classic 1978 film starring Christopher Reeve (to me the best ever Clark Kent & Superman) along with Gene Hackman, Margot Kidder & many others. Brainiac (first seen in the Superman comics over 60 years ago) makes a good villian & the story is very strong for a comic. These days so many comics & films featuring Superman, Batman & other comic book heroes all feel that that have to be very dark & very moody. Superman '78 is a real breath of fresh air & reminds me why I used to enjoy reading comics so much...because it was FUN.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Khurram

    Old school nostalgia all the way. This not my favorite Superman book but it was a trip down memory lane. The artwork and drawing all the characters to look like the actors from the original movies was a nice touch, in no small part as a tribute to Christopher Reeves. A slight change to the Superman mythos, and having Brainiac appear in 1978 with that times technology was good. It had all the feeling of the original movies. A great tribute trip to the past. The book finishes with a sketch book and Old school nostalgia all the way. This not my favorite Superman book but it was a trip down memory lane. The artwork and drawing all the characters to look like the actors from the original movies was a nice touch, in no small part as a tribute to Christopher Reeves. A slight change to the Superman mythos, and having Brainiac appear in 1978 with that times technology was good. It had all the feeling of the original movies. A great tribute trip to the past. The book finishes with a sketch book and full page cover gallery.

  4. 5 out of 5

    William Yates

    Captures the classic pulp tone of the original film whilst pulling in some familiar comic elements. A specific panel in issue 6 had my slack jawed, it along with the entire run is a perfect celebration of Richard Donner's work. Captures the classic pulp tone of the original film whilst pulling in some familiar comic elements. A specific panel in issue 6 had my slack jawed, it along with the entire run is a perfect celebration of Richard Donner's work.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Sheila McCarthy

    Story is kinda meh but it was a fun concept and fun to see the artist's recreation of the stars of the movie. Story is kinda meh but it was a fun concept and fun to see the artist's recreation of the stars of the movie.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    Story was interesting and art work was incredible, really refreshing to see something different and captured Christopher Reeves iconic portrayal or the character excellently

  7. 5 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    Robert Venditti and Wilfredo Torres have done several remarkable and wonderful things with “Superman ’78”. Three things, actually. 1) They have succeeded in getting me to read a “Superman” comic book at my age, something that I had very little interest in ever doing again, as I believe that Superman is one of the most boring, vanilla-flavored superheroes of all time. With the exception of Richard Donner’s 1978 “Superman: The Movie” (which I’ll get to later), I have not really been impressed with Robert Venditti and Wilfredo Torres have done several remarkable and wonderful things with “Superman ’78”. Three things, actually. 1) They have succeeded in getting me to read a “Superman” comic book at my age, something that I had very little interest in ever doing again, as I believe that Superman is one of the most boring, vanilla-flavored superheroes of all time. With the exception of Richard Donner’s 1978 “Superman: The Movie” (which I’ll get to later), I have not really been impressed with any TV or movie version made since featuring Superman, especially Zach Snyder’s “Man of Steel”, “Dawn of Justice”, and “Justice League”, all of which I thought sucked. That I not only read but greatly enjoyed “Superman ’78” is a testament to the artistic teamwork of Venditti/Torres (and credit must also go to colorist Jordie Bellaire) for truly capturing the child-like wonder and joy that I remember so fondly from both growing up in the ‘70s and seeing the original Donner film. Which leads me to 2) They have written, in graphic novel form, a beautiful time capsule of the late-‘70s/early-‘80s. Besides featuring the original stellar cast of the ’78 film (Gene Hackman, Marlon Brando, Margot Kidder, Jackie Cooper, and Christopher Reeve), they have also included some brilliant “guest stars”, including David Bowie as Brainiac, which is pretty brilliant casting, as it fits perfectly with Bowie’s “Ziggy Stardust/Starman” persona from the ‘70s. Also, there are Easter eggs galore throughout the book. Be on the look-out for some familiar faces in the crowds. 3) They have created a graphic novel love letter to Donner’s film, which is still, in my humble opinion, the best superhero film ever made. I was six years old when the film came out, and I remember being absolutely in awe. John Williams’s fantastic score, Donner’s brilliant directing, and Reeve’s iconic performance truly convinced me that superheroes could exist in the real world. This truly is one of the best graphic novels I have read in a while, and maybe it is for sentimental and nostalgic reasons, but I would gladly pay money to have this on my bookshelf.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Darik

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. A charming, entertaining throwback to the Christopher Reeve Superman films that never quite coheres into anything more than a hollow novelty. The script by Robert Venditti threads a number of themes and ideas through the story-- second chances, family reunions, self-sacrifice, culture shock, conservationists as self-important fascists (???)-- but doesn't do the work to bring them together into any kind of thematically-consistent whole. The Brainiac over-story is just a fun adventure where Superma A charming, entertaining throwback to the Christopher Reeve Superman films that never quite coheres into anything more than a hollow novelty. The script by Robert Venditti threads a number of themes and ideas through the story-- second chances, family reunions, self-sacrifice, culture shock, conservationists as self-important fascists (???)-- but doesn't do the work to bring them together into any kind of thematically-consistent whole. The Brainiac over-story is just a fun adventure where Superman punches a green guy and his robots in the face, then stops for a whole, and then does it all again-- there's not a lot of creativity on display here, and a lot of beats are swiped wholesale from Geoff Johns' "Brainiac" storyline from 2009. Now, even if it's not a terribly meaty book, on a micro level the character interactions ARE really fun; Venditti nails most of the characters' voices (except for Jor-El, unfortunately), and the interactions and banter are some of the best stuff in the book. It's just all... y'know... kind of empty. Wilfredo Torres does solid enough work with the artwork, too. It's a little cartoony, but he does a great job of capturing actors' likenesses (in heavily abstracted form). And his inclusion of cameos and Easter eggs is a lot of fun! It's light and fluffy, and it doesn't leave a HUGE impression... but if you love the Richard Donner/Christopher Reeve films, then I could think of worse things to read over a lazy afternoon.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    There is SOME of the Superman movie in this, mainly in terms of this version of Clark and Lex. But I didn't really see this as some unofficial sequel to the original film. But, it's not a bad retro Superman tale and the art is plenty lively. There is SOME of the Superman movie in this, mainly in terms of this version of Clark and Lex. But I didn't really see this as some unofficial sequel to the original film. But, it's not a bad retro Superman tale and the art is plenty lively.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jainam

    If you're a fan of the classic films where's it's just a dumb world and an adventure without worrying about consequences (even the people in the story don't), this might be the one for you! If you're a fan of the classic films where's it's just a dumb world and an adventure without worrying about consequences (even the people in the story don't), this might be the one for you!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    It's....surprising and very much appreciated that Venditti was allowed to so perfectly capture and present the spirit of Richard Donner's films. It's....surprising and very much appreciated that Venditti was allowed to so perfectly capture and present the spirit of Richard Donner's films.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Donavon

    Feels like an 80s Superman film. Loved it.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Over the last several years I've found myself less and less interested in DC Comics, which sucks because it was essentially my introduction to the medium twenty five years ago. I don't know if I'll ever go back to their main superhero continuity, but it's nice to see they still occasionally put out something I'm interested in. Granted this is very specifically designed for people like me who tire of the many crossovers and retcons and crises. It's entirely driven by nostalgia and it's somewhat ir Over the last several years I've found myself less and less interested in DC Comics, which sucks because it was essentially my introduction to the medium twenty five years ago. I don't know if I'll ever go back to their main superhero continuity, but it's nice to see they still occasionally put out something I'm interested in. Granted this is very specifically designed for people like me who tire of the many crossovers and retcons and crises. It's entirely driven by nostalgia and it's somewhat ironic that they've resorted to creating a comicbook sequel to the classic Superman film while Warner Bros still apparently have no idea how to convincingly bring the character back to the big screen. Sorry, this isn't the time or place for my many ranty thoughts about the state of DC in comics or on the screen. It's unclear whether this is a sequel to the first film only, or all four of hte Christopher Reeve led films, and it doesn't really matter. There are some references to a few of the sequels but they act more like nods than any hard confirmations of canon. It feels very much of the time with Clark Kent's old fashioned farmboy, Lex Luthor's crazed ranting and Lois Lane's fiery determination to get a story at all costs. While it's clearly set in the same continuity as the films it feels like a comic and not a film, which helps the story as it plays to the right medium. I like the comparison between Braniac and Superman both being the last of their kind, but both approach the situation at opposite ends of the spectrum. The art is really nice, again it feels like a throwback to an earlier time, it all looks very 1970s, and for the most part each character looks like the actors that portrayed them in the film. I also love that Brainiac is apparently being played by David Bowie in this story. I'm not sure if they're doing more of these but I'd be up for reading more from this universe.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ross

    If you're a fan of the original Superman movies or a fan or Richard Donner's work, you'll like this homage to the classic film. The art style captures the likenesses of all the actors perfectly. We've got another Superman story set after the events seen in the blockbuster movie. All of the famous faces you knew and loved are back for this new adventure. Brainiac makes his debut as only he can. Luthor is still scheming and Perry White is still a cranky newspaper editor. Can Superman save Metropoli If you're a fan of the original Superman movies or a fan or Richard Donner's work, you'll like this homage to the classic film. The art style captures the likenesses of all the actors perfectly. We've got another Superman story set after the events seen in the blockbuster movie. All of the famous faces you knew and loved are back for this new adventure. Brainiac makes his debut as only he can. Luthor is still scheming and Perry White is still a cranky newspaper editor. Can Superman save Metropolis from the power of science or will he bottle it all up? ... Bonus: Keep an eye out for a special Donner cameo during the final battle. Bonus Bonus: Richard Pryor's character even makes a cameo

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jeremiah Murphy

    I loved it, I could hear the actors voices. I thought this was a good Lex story. I wish Brainiac was “cast” as a ‘78 actor. I can kind of see this Brainiac as Richard Moll from Night Court. But I wish there were a few more ties to 1978. I liked all the print journalism parts—some mini reporting lessons there.

  16. 4 out of 5

    David Grant

    Superman '78 is an enjoyable read set in the iconic Donner film verse. Sometimes the writing and artwork are a little bland and/or inconsistent, but ultimately Venditti and Torres have created some entertaining nostalgia which fans of the Christopher Reeve Superman should enjoy (too bad we didn't get a movie like THIS in 2006). In fact, along with Superman Year One, this is probably the best Superman book DC has released in the past 6-7 years. It's also great to see Brainiac and Kandor appear i Superman '78 is an enjoyable read set in the iconic Donner film verse. Sometimes the writing and artwork are a little bland and/or inconsistent, but ultimately Venditti and Torres have created some entertaining nostalgia which fans of the Christopher Reeve Superman should enjoy (too bad we didn't get a movie like THIS in 2006). In fact, along with Superman Year One, this is probably the best Superman book DC has released in the past 6-7 years. It's also great to see Brainiac and Kandor appear in this iteration. Lex, Jor-El, Lois, etc all play interesting roles in the story with both drama and quirkiness. The action scenes are cool too. Best of all, the classic status quo -- no one (not even Lois) knows Clark's secret identity -- is in tact, as it should always be, just as Jerry Siegel envisaged. Apparently, a sequel is in the works. That should be interesting. Hopefully, they don't wreck the classic status quo, and instead focus more on introducing other characters and villains (like Parasite or Toyman) and maybe tie up a few loose ends (i.e. whatever happened to Lana Lang and Lacy Warfield?) These comic book stories that continue the movieverses of these characters is a good idea (Batman '89, Wonder Woman '77 and Batman '66) are also pretty cool reads. Would be interesting to see them do more with this concept (e.g. maybe do a one-shot team-up of Superman '78 and Wonder Woman '77 (Lynda Carter has said she would've liked to do a team-up with Superman); or maybe do a comic of the George Reeves Superman '55; or even a Fleischer Superman '41.) ... so many possibilities.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Shaun Stanley

    Superman ‘78 collects issues 1-6 of the DC Comic series written by Robert Venditti with art by Willfredo Torres. Set in Richard Donner’s Superman movie universe, Brainiac discovers that a Kryptonian is still alive and travels to earth to eradicate Superman. After the nostalgia factor wares off, the story has your typical Brainiac plot - who I have never thought was a very interesting character anyways. The art has somewhat likenesses to Clark Kent/Superman, Lois Lane, Lex Luthor, among other fil Superman ‘78 collects issues 1-6 of the DC Comic series written by Robert Venditti with art by Willfredo Torres. Set in Richard Donner’s Superman movie universe, Brainiac discovers that a Kryptonian is still alive and travels to earth to eradicate Superman. After the nostalgia factor wares off, the story has your typical Brainiac plot - who I have never thought was a very interesting character anyways. The art has somewhat likenesses to Clark Kent/Superman, Lois Lane, Lex Luthor, among other film characters, but just generic enough to not be them either. Venditti does a good job on most of the characters sounding like their movie counterparts. My biggest problem with the book is that it does and doesn’t fit into the movie continuity. I guess it’s supposed to be a direct sequel to the original Superman film, but feels like it should be sequel to Superman II, but doesn’t fit in with the continuity (Richard Donner was still heavily involved in the sequel even though he was famously removed as director). I also don’t think Brainiac fits with the 70s era of the film. Maybe it would have worked better if the designs looked more like how a movie would have created and filmed Brainiac from that time period. I think Metallo would have worked a lot better as a villain for this universe. I really wish DC did this book many years ago where they could have actually had Richard Donner as a co-writer to the book. It would have been really cool to see what else he could done with the Superman mythos.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Tim Deforest

    This was a mini-series set in the Christopher Reeve movie universe and the script captures the ambiance and characters of the movie perfectly. Wildredo Torres' art also does a great job of visually capturing them--Superman looks like Reeve's version, Lex Luthor looks like Gene Hackman, etc. The plot brings in Braniac, the bottle city of Kandor and other elements of Superman's Silver/Bronze Age mythology, telling a strong story with Superman's moral sensibilities and determination to protect the This was a mini-series set in the Christopher Reeve movie universe and the script captures the ambiance and characters of the movie perfectly. Wildredo Torres' art also does a great job of visually capturing them--Superman looks like Reeve's version, Lex Luthor looks like Gene Hackman, etc. The plot brings in Braniac, the bottle city of Kandor and other elements of Superman's Silver/Bronze Age mythology, telling a strong story with Superman's moral sensibilities and determination to protect the innocent being the emotional centerpiece of it all. It's great fun from start to finish.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Brian Meenan

    I loved this, Christopher Reeve made me fall in love with superman as a kid and reading this I could hear Christopher Reeve and Gene Hackmans & the rest of the movies cast voices playing it out , I wish all superman comics were like this since the 80s and I cant wait for the follow up series that is spoken off on the Inside cover flaps. I know people will disagree but for me personally 5 stars possibly for the nostalgia as I still watch the 1st 2 movies every year.And this is a quick read too.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Jamie

    Pretty fun and enjoyable, but not the best Superman story you'll ever read or anything. A good legacy for the old movies. I do have to say, though, that the strange Goonies cameo felt more than just a little out of place, especially because this was supposed to be taking place in 1978 when they all would have been about four or five years old as per the timeline of their own movie. It was just a little jarring to me is all - Didn't hurt the story, per se, but, like, weird choice. Pretty fun and enjoyable, but not the best Superman story you'll ever read or anything. A good legacy for the old movies. I do have to say, though, that the strange Goonies cameo felt more than just a little out of place, especially because this was supposed to be taking place in 1978 when they all would have been about four or five years old as per the timeline of their own movie. It was just a little jarring to me is all - Didn't hurt the story, per se, but, like, weird choice.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Morrison

    After all these years, we finally got the epic Superman III we’d been waiting for. The artwork is uplifting and the characters voices are just like they were in the 1978 Superman series! It really does feel like Christopher Reeve, Gene Hackman, Margot Kidder, and Marlon Brando are speaking in my head. Very well done!

  22. 4 out of 5

    Yosef Shapiro

    This story captures the tone and flavor of the Chris Reeves Superman films. It could easily be an entry in the film series.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ernie

    Sequel to Reeve’s first Superman film. Good story that hopefully has Hollywood finally use Brainiac in whatever Superman’s next movie is. Torres' art is good and I love the easter eggs. Sequel to Reeve’s first Superman film. Good story that hopefully has Hollywood finally use Brainiac in whatever Superman’s next movie is. Torres' art is good and I love the easter eggs.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Chris Fergo

    What Superman III could've been. What Superman III could've been.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Chris Robertson

    I left this wishing we had gotten this rather than Superman 3 (though there is a guy in one of the panels that looks like Richard Pryor….is that Gus?). I liked how the essence of the characters as they appeared in the Donner movies remains intact. The introduction to Brainiac is in keeping with that spirit as well, with nods to his 80s robotic form used cleverly. Reads rapidly. Art is good, close renderings to the actors, which this series demands.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Oguz Kagan

    çerezlik hoş bi superman hikayesi

  27. 4 out of 5

    Hew La France

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Fulton

  29. 5 out of 5

    Adrian Montanez

  30. 5 out of 5

    Robert

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...