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From Eisner-Award nominated writer Marika McCoola and debut artist Aatmaja Pandya, an emotional coming-of-age graphic novel for fans of Bloom and Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up with Me. Right before Jade is about to leave for a summer art intensive, her best friend, Phoebe, attempts suicide. How is Jade supposed to focus on herself right now? But at the Art Farm, Jade has ar From Eisner-Award nominated writer Marika McCoola and debut artist Aatmaja Pandya, an emotional coming-of-age graphic novel for fans of Bloom and Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up with Me. Right before Jade is about to leave for a summer art intensive, her best friend, Phoebe, attempts suicide. How is Jade supposed to focus on herself right now? But at the Art Farm, Jade has artistic opportunities she’s been waiting for her whole life. And as she gets to know her classmates, she begins to fall for whimsical, upbeat, comfortable-in-her-own-skin Mary. Jade pours herself into making ceramic monsters that vent her stress and insecurities, but when she puts her creatures in the kiln, something unreal happens: they come to life. And they’re taking a stand: if Jade won’t confront her problems, her problems are going to confront her, including the scariest of them all—if Jade grows, prospers, and even falls in love this summer, is she leaving Phoebe behind?


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From Eisner-Award nominated writer Marika McCoola and debut artist Aatmaja Pandya, an emotional coming-of-age graphic novel for fans of Bloom and Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up with Me. Right before Jade is about to leave for a summer art intensive, her best friend, Phoebe, attempts suicide. How is Jade supposed to focus on herself right now? But at the Art Farm, Jade has ar From Eisner-Award nominated writer Marika McCoola and debut artist Aatmaja Pandya, an emotional coming-of-age graphic novel for fans of Bloom and Laura Dean Keeps Breaking Up with Me. Right before Jade is about to leave for a summer art intensive, her best friend, Phoebe, attempts suicide. How is Jade supposed to focus on herself right now? But at the Art Farm, Jade has artistic opportunities she’s been waiting for her whole life. And as she gets to know her classmates, she begins to fall for whimsical, upbeat, comfortable-in-her-own-skin Mary. Jade pours herself into making ceramic monsters that vent her stress and insecurities, but when she puts her creatures in the kiln, something unreal happens: they come to life. And they’re taking a stand: if Jade won’t confront her problems, her problems are going to confront her, including the scariest of them all—if Jade grows, prospers, and even falls in love this summer, is she leaving Phoebe behind?

30 review for Slip

  1. 5 out of 5

    destiny ♡ howling libraries

    Slip follows Jade's summer at an art camp immediately following her best friend's attempted suicide, and Jade must try to juggle her goal of winning a college scholarship alongside realizing her best friend is in terrible pain. Through all of this, there's an unexpected romance with another girl at camp, and Jade finds herself understandably overwhelmed with the variety of feelings happening at once. Unfortunately, while this graphic novel sounded great in theory, almost nothing about it worked f Slip follows Jade's summer at an art camp immediately following her best friend's attempted suicide, and Jade must try to juggle her goal of winning a college scholarship alongside realizing her best friend is in terrible pain. Through all of this, there's an unexpected romance with another girl at camp, and Jade finds herself understandably overwhelmed with the variety of feelings happening at once. Unfortunately, while this graphic novel sounded great in theory, almost nothing about it worked for me. The art is beautiful, but primarily in black-and-white, and I agree with a lot of other reviewers that it would have been improved tremendously by being a full-color graphic novel. It's an entire story revolving around art and taking place at an art camp, so choosing not to colorize the book feels like a massive missed opportunity! While I loved the queer rep, Jade and Mary (and all of the other characters, too) are so flat that I could not possibly bring myself to feel invested in the romance forming between them. There's a bit of back-and-forth "will they, won't they", but it doesn't carry any weight, and when the two of them get into a tiff over miscommunication, it doesn't cast Mary in a good light (multiple panels of her throwing items in Jade's direction out of anger — something we don't need to normalize in arguments, even among teens). And finally, as far as the representation of Phoebe's suicide attempts and how it affects Jade, I was uncomfortable with a lot of the commentary. Phoebe's suicide attempts only served as a prop for Jade's own pain, and I kept feeling like Jade cared less about how her best friend was doing and more about how it affected her, or how she had "missed the signs". There are a few moments where it felt that Jade was vilifying Phoebe and blaming her, and while there is a side character who makes great points about mental illness, I don't think we ever got to see Jade fully actualize those realizations for herself. Obviously, she's a teenager and I'm not expecting her to be the most emotionally mature character I've ever read, but it's hard to root for her. All in all, Slip is a classic case of great theory, poor execution. I would have loved to have given this a higher rating, but I was disappointed and uncomfortable with too many elements to justify it. ✨ Representation: Jade and Mary are queer; multiple characters are BIPOC (no specific representation is mentioned for any of them) ✨ Content warnings for: attempted suicide of a side character, mentions of self-harm, brief depictions of self-harm scars Thank you so much to the publisher for providing me with this review copy in exchange for an honest review! ——— twitter | booktok | bookstagram | blog

  2. 4 out of 5

    Amy Imogene Reads

    3 stars Art, pain, and discussions of friendship bonds and finding your individual voice collide in this new graphic novel for young readers. Concept: ★★★ Plot/Pacing: ★★★ Characters: ★★★ A quick disclaimer and a content warning: This young graphic novel deals heavily with discussions of suicide. Please be warned before proceeding with this review or others on this book. Slip follows the summer journey of Jade, a young artist about to go off on a summer art program at the Art Farm. Right before Jad 3 stars Art, pain, and discussions of friendship bonds and finding your individual voice collide in this new graphic novel for young readers. Concept: ★★★ Plot/Pacing: ★★★ Characters: ★★★ A quick disclaimer and a content warning: This young graphic novel deals heavily with discussions of suicide. Please be warned before proceeding with this review or others on this book. Slip follows the summer journey of Jade, a young artist about to go off on a summer art program at the Art Farm. Right before Jade leaves for the camp, she receives the news that her best friend, Phoebe, has attempted suicide. Phoebe is immediately sent off for treatment and help, and Jade is still sent to art camp. Now separated from Phoebe and dealing with the complex feelings of being on intimate sidelines of such an event, Slip delves into the tangled ball of yarn of friendships, suicide, internal healing, and growth. And, to make matters even more interesting, Jade's art pieces start to come to life at the camp—forcing Jade to confront a lot of her internal feelings around Phoebe, life, and what comes next. I thought this graphic novel had a wonderful concept. The idea of a suicide impacting the social network around the affected individual—like a stone dropped into a pond, rippling outward—was a great topic, and having it conveyed to a younger audience even more so as this is something that affects groups of all ages, not just adults. However, I must say that I felt a lot of mixed feelings while experiencing this story. Jade's self-absorption over the impacts of Phoebe's decision on Jade's own life read as selfish to me as opposed to caring, and while this was clearly NOT the author's intention, it then started to feel to me that the story was sidelining the real truth of Phoebe's story and subsequent trauma and somehow prioritizing the selfish angles of Jade as the "hurt best friend." It was always going to be a tightrope to balance this topic, and even if it was done flawlessly it might have continued to feel uncomfortable, but still... it struck the wrong chords with me. In addition to the handling of the sensitive topics at hand, I also thought it was an odd artistic choice to have a very visual arts-themed graphic novel told entirely in grayscale colors, with an occasional pop of pink accents. This would have had such a different tone if done in full color, and might have more accurately represented the vibrant arts camp setting. I am assuming the artist's intention was to have it gray to represent the very heavy topics at hand, but to me personally it felt off. Thank you to Algonquin Books for Young Readers for my copy in exchange for an honest review. Blog | Instagram

  3. 4 out of 5

    Danika at The Lesbrary

    This is one of those tricky books to recommend, because it’s not an upbeat or exciting read. It’s fundamentally about a teenager stumbling and raging and weeping through something really difficult. She lashes out at others. She makes bad decisions. Her journey through this is messy and nonlinear. But that’s also what makes this feel real and what made me feel for her so much. I hope this is one that makes its way to classroom and library bookshelves, because I can imagine that a lot of teenagers This is one of those tricky books to recommend, because it’s not an upbeat or exciting read. It’s fundamentally about a teenager stumbling and raging and weeping through something really difficult. She lashes out at others. She makes bad decisions. Her journey through this is messy and nonlinear. But that’s also what makes this feel real and what made me feel for her so much. I hope this is one that makes its way to classroom and library bookshelves, because I can imagine that a lot of teenagers especially will appreciate this honest portrayal of what it’s like to love someone who is going through a mental health crisis—the helplessness and grief and anger and every other tangled, overwhelming emotion that comes with it. Full review at the Lesbrary.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Andy

    Thank you to Algonquin Young Readers for sending me a copy of this in exchange for promotion. All opinions are my own. This was so sad but also I am soft. Rep: sapphic cis female MC, Asian sapphic cis female side character, Black cis male side character, white cis female side characters, Black cis female side character. CWs: Suicide attempt, self harm, suicidal thoughts. Moderate: mental illness, panic attacks, blood, injury/injury detail. Minor: drug abuse, grief.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sarah {The Clever Reader}

    This was an adorable YA graphic novel about self discovery, love, and friendship. I thought the art was beautifully done and definitely recommend this to other graphic novel lovers.

  6. 4 out of 5

    atlas ♡

    check out my review on my booksta on the 10th!

  7. 4 out of 5

    charlotte,

    see my review on ig Rep: South Asian American sapphic mc, sapphic li, Black side characters CWs: suicide attempts (side character) see my review on ig Rep: South Asian American sapphic mc, sapphic li, Black side characters CWs: suicide attempts (side character)

  8. 4 out of 5

    Trans-cending-literature

    I really enjoyed the art style of this book! I really enjoyed how this book depicted the MCs relationship with her art in this and how she navigated emotions. I think this book lacked alot of the emotion it was trying to convey. It wanted us to feel bad for Pheobe, but didn’t give us any context or really anything about her at all. This art program is really weird. Its just in the woods? only has 4 students? Shes living alone in a campers as a teen? Seriously what is this place it felt weird I wi I really enjoyed the art style of this book! I really enjoyed how this book depicted the MCs relationship with her art in this and how she navigated emotions. I think this book lacked alot of the emotion it was trying to convey. It wanted us to feel bad for Pheobe, but didn’t give us any context or really anything about her at all. This art program is really weird. Its just in the woods? only has 4 students? Shes living alone in a campers as a teen? Seriously what is this place it felt weird I wish the romance wasnt here at all. It had n emotion or build up and was just lacking overall. This book comes out on June 7, 2022.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I'm excited to look at this final art, since the early version was not complete. This is a fabulous story about what it is to grieve the loss of a could-have-been, the loss of a friendship, and what it is to worry deeply about someone's struggle with mental illness. It's also a queer romantic story of Jade, a girl going to art camp, as she learns to find her voice -- HER voice -- through her art. I'm excited to look at this final art, since the early version was not complete. This is a fabulous story about what it is to grieve the loss of a could-have-been, the loss of a friendship, and what it is to worry deeply about someone's struggle with mental illness. It's also a queer romantic story of Jade, a girl going to art camp, as she learns to find her voice -- HER voice -- through her art.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bre

    **Thank you Algonquin Books for giving me the opportunity to win this graphic novel in a goodreads giveaway!** I don't consider myself an artist, but as a mentally ill woman who appreciates the arts deeply and veers on the side of creativity from time to time, this book was beautiful in my honest opinion. the illustrations were beautiful and the writing was much deeper than I was expecting. This is a quick read that packs a punch and reminds you that dealing with your emotions alone is not the on **Thank you Algonquin Books for giving me the opportunity to win this graphic novel in a goodreads giveaway!** I don't consider myself an artist, but as a mentally ill woman who appreciates the arts deeply and veers on the side of creativity from time to time, this book was beautiful in my honest opinion. the illustrations were beautiful and the writing was much deeper than I was expecting. This is a quick read that packs a punch and reminds you that dealing with your emotions alone is not the only option and in those moments where you feel the most helpless art is there to guide you.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Adrienne Blaine

    As someone who did summer art programs as a teen, I thought this book would resonate more, but it just fell flat for me. I think the illlustrations by Aatmaja Pandya are dynamic and expressive. I particularly enjoyed how the book included descriptions of ceramicist tools and processes. Sadly, the storyline and writing in this advanced reader copy was uneven in its development and pacing. I also did not find the way that the author dealt with the topic of self harm and suicide to be particularly As someone who did summer art programs as a teen, I thought this book would resonate more, but it just fell flat for me. I think the illlustrations by Aatmaja Pandya are dynamic and expressive. I particularly enjoyed how the book included descriptions of ceramicist tools and processes. Sadly, the storyline and writing in this advanced reader copy was uneven in its development and pacing. I also did not find the way that the author dealt with the topic of self harm and suicide to be particularly up-to-date. Many people are choosing not to use terms like "commit suicide" because it frames suicide as a sin or crime. Perhaps this language will change by the publication date. Overall, the book focuses on a main character whose friend attempted suicide, but it seemed like it teetered on the edge of perpetuating some misconceptions about suicide in the process as the main character tries to confront her own emotions around it. The ending is nice and empowering in many ways, but it doesn't resolve all the other issues I have with the book. I voluntarily obtained a digital version of this book free from Netgalley and Algonquin Young Readers in exchange for an honest review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amelia

    Thank you to NetGalley and Algonquin Young Readers for providing an e-arc in exchange for an honest review. Before: I can't wait to get started on this one! After: Slip follows Jade's summer at an art camp immediately following her best friend's attempted suicide. While at camp Jade must try to juggle her goal of winning a college scholarship with realising the pain her best friend is experiencing. Taking on such a big topic from an outside characters perspective is a large undertaking and I feel t Thank you to NetGalley and Algonquin Young Readers for providing an e-arc in exchange for an honest review. Before: I can't wait to get started on this one! After: Slip follows Jade's summer at an art camp immediately following her best friend's attempted suicide. While at camp Jade must try to juggle her goal of winning a college scholarship with realising the pain her best friend is experiencing. Taking on such a big topic from an outside characters perspective is a large undertaking and I feel this portrayed that well - sympathetic whilst also not fully comprehending why someone you love feels this way. The way in which Jade's pain and overwhelm at the situation is conveyed is beautiful and well captured - although I was not expecting the magical realism aspect and don't feel it was fully resolved/explained, The art is beautiful, but primarily in black-and-white and felt at times like sketches. While this works for the project I also feel this could have worked as a full-colour graphic novel because the whole story revolves around art/an artist/art school.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Heather Freeman

    This is an excellent YA graphic novel that deals with some of the heaviest of topics (attempted suicide, friendships evolving and dealing with mental illness, artistic crises of confidence, general fears for the future) in a deft and assured way. The art is absolutely stunning, and the plot seamlessly blends the magical with the mundane, the high-stakes with the everyday, in a way that makes me want to return to the book again and again (even though I consumed it breathlessly in one sitting).

  14. 4 out of 5

    Liz

    This book attempted big emotional overtures that, unfortunately, might’ve been out of its league. I was very excited by the idea of seeing Jade and Phoebe’s friendship play out in the fire visions, but it didn’t end up providing the emotional punch it needed. Interestingly, where other readers seem to have been put off by Jade’s thoughts about Phoebe’s suicide attempt centering on the frustration that her best friend didn’t talk to her about her feelings, I found it to be the most realistic and This book attempted big emotional overtures that, unfortunately, might’ve been out of its league. I was very excited by the idea of seeing Jade and Phoebe’s friendship play out in the fire visions, but it didn’t end up providing the emotional punch it needed. Interestingly, where other readers seem to have been put off by Jade’s thoughts about Phoebe’s suicide attempt centering on the frustration that her best friend didn’t talk to her about her feelings, I found it to be the most realistic and relatable part of the book! In a strange coincidence, my best friend in HS was also named Phoebe and also attempted suicide, and although there were lots of differences in circumstances, I found myself feeling like I wasn’t enough, because why would my best friend want to leave me??? Of course in hindsight, that isn’t what any of her struggles were about, but suicide in particular has a way of victimizing the survivors that deserves to be recognized. All in all, I think this book ended up trapped somewhere between middle-grade and YA, because it didn’t go as far as it maybe needed to for the emotional story arc.

  15. 4 out of 5

    ReadingTilTheBreakOfDawn

    Slip follows a teen, Jade to an art camp immediately following the suicide attempt of her BFF, Phoebe. Jade has a hard time at camp because she is so preoccupied with thoughts of her friend and trying to figure out how to create art in a cohesive manner and with a message. The pressure of creating art while thinking about her friend back home is enough to really stress a teen out. Add in a side of romance and Jade is all confused and doesn't know what to do with all her emotions. Slip had an inter Slip follows a teen, Jade to an art camp immediately following the suicide attempt of her BFF, Phoebe. Jade has a hard time at camp because she is so preoccupied with thoughts of her friend and trying to figure out how to create art in a cohesive manner and with a message. The pressure of creating art while thinking about her friend back home is enough to really stress a teen out. Add in a side of romance and Jade is all confused and doesn't know what to do with all her emotions. Slip had an interesting concept and great bones for a story of a teen grappling with a lot, but the story fell a little short for me. I didn't get to connect with Phoebe and felt the beginning of the story just skimmed over Phoebe and her mental health. We really could've benefitted with more from her and/or her mother. I think an opportunity was lost to have Jade grow as a person with her knowledge of what was going on with her friend as opposed to making it all about herself. Including LGBTQ rep was a great addition. I liked having Jade finding love with Mary at the camp. They had some great times, but also had a few toxic situations that were glossed over. We even get a memory of a conversation with Phoebe that was just thrown in there, but I wasn't sure why it was included. The camp itself was a little odd for a small group of teens, but I suspended my belief for that and for Jade's lively art. I enjoyed the creations that Jade came up with and how they came alive with their own emotions that paralleled what Jade was going through. With that said, I enjoyed the drawings that went with the story. I liked when we got thoughts of Phoebe, the color changed from black and white to red. For graphic novels, the visuals must bring the words alive. But for this being a book about an artist at an art camp, wouldn't it have been cool for this to have been in full color to really wow us with the art?? Overall, there really were great ideas, but the execution fell a wee flat. I shared my book with my young teen and will share their thoughts on the book below.... Kai's review (from a young teens perspective): It seems like Slip is more like a 2nd book because it goes right into the suicide attempt at the beginning without explaining anything. I wish I got to know Phoebe's story a bit more because it seemed really important to Jade and how she was coping. I liked that Jade and Mary started a deeper friendship at the art camp, but I wanted to know more about them as a couple. The art that Jade began to make at the camp was really cool and I liked the meaning behind it. I think the emotional parts of the animals were very relatable. I liked that this graphic novel talks a little bit about mental health because that is very important to teenagers right now and that should be represented more in books. As with any graphic novel, the art has to go with the story. I liked the art style, but it made the characters seemed young, until we see the serious topics like suicide and including smoking by a teenager. If this were to become a series, I would definitely want to read more about these characters. Overall, I'd say that this book was 4 star. I enjoyed it, but there were a few things things I would change. I would recommend it to teens that are struggling with mental health and/or a part of the LGBTQ community because of the representation in it. We need more books like this to make us feel included and this graphic novel really did that.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    I would like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review. I enjoyed this graphic novel. We follow Jade at an art summer camp after she finds out her best friend has tried to commit suicide and her own thoughts and feelings on it and how it starts to effect her art. Told beautifully through the art, we see how Jade tries to come to terms with her friend's suicide attempt and a burgeoning summer romance all at the same time. I would like to thank Netgalley and the publisher for an advance copy in exchange for an honest review. I enjoyed this graphic novel. We follow Jade at an art summer camp after she finds out her best friend has tried to commit suicide and her own thoughts and feelings on it and how it starts to effect her art. Told beautifully through the art, we see how Jade tries to come to terms with her friend's suicide attempt and a burgeoning summer romance all at the same time.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Isaiah

    Check out the review on 6/4/22 or later as part of the blog tour! (link will not work before that day) Check out the review on 6/4/22 or later as part of the blog tour! (link will not work before that day)

  18. 4 out of 5

    dee (andie) 🕺🏼✨

    * e-ARC provided through NetGalley * there are a few things that I liked about this novel and a few things I didn't. I think there were many great aspects of it, like queer representation, without which I think this would've been much worse. but I also didn't really find the plot interesting. this graphic novel was quick and reflective, which I liked. there wasn't too much text, which helped me engage in the story more. the art style was great, although, even if this is just a personal preferenc * e-ARC provided through NetGalley * there are a few things that I liked about this novel and a few things I didn't. I think there were many great aspects of it, like queer representation, without which I think this would've been much worse. but I also didn't really find the plot interesting. this graphic novel was quick and reflective, which I liked. there wasn't too much text, which helped me engage in the story more. the art style was great, although, even if this is just a personal preference, I think pages in color (and- in this case, certain scenes in black and white instead of red) could've done SO MUCH for this book. kind of like the art on the cover. the main character, on the other hand, wasn't good enough for my liking. she was a typical teenager going through phases of anger and reflection, which I actually found very relatable- but she just wasn't interesting. I couldn't get myself to like her. overall, this was okay! not bad, but could've been better.

  19. 4 out of 5

    BespectacledBookGirl

    It’s book tour day!! Thank you so much to Algonquin Young Readers for the free e-ARC for review and book release hype! I went into SLIP blind – truthfully, I only requested it because I was a teen ceramicist and related to the cover—and was thrust into a deeply locked away memory: that of a childhood friend harming themselves, and having to “go away for a bit.” In Marika McCoola and Aatmaja Pandya’s YA graphic novel SLIP (which releases on Monday, June 7!!), readers first meet main character Jade It’s book tour day!! Thank you so much to Algonquin Young Readers for the free e-ARC for review and book release hype! I went into SLIP blind – truthfully, I only requested it because I was a teen ceramicist and related to the cover—and was thrust into a deeply locked away memory: that of a childhood friend harming themselves, and having to “go away for a bit.” In Marika McCoola and Aatmaja Pandya’s YA graphic novel SLIP (which releases on Monday, June 7!!), readers first meet main character Jade in this exact critical, devastating, formative moment. Her best friend Phoebe calls to let Jade know that she won’t be coming over as planned. She is in the hospital, she’s tried to un-alive herself, and she will be there for a while. What follows is a summer of Jade endeavoring to stay afloat and tuned into her art while grief ricochets through her inner person. What’s the point of continuing in the art program without the friend who built your confidence to apply? How can you focus on learning new things, when what you want to know is barricaded behind no-contact rules and patient confidentiality? SLIP has excellent pacing with an incredible use of image to drive it home. A few frames in, the artists zoom in on a pencil tip snapping under the weight of Jade’s internal collapse as she processes Phoebe’s fearful news. The pencil snapped, and I was hooked. The story follows Jade as she embarks on an intensive summer residency at The Art Farm. She is shaken by the incomprehensible, new Phoebe. She grapples with relentless mental tailspins of unanswered questions and fears, wondering if she in some way failed her friend or pushed her over the edge. Struggling to hone the vision for her artwork due to her anguish, Jade must confront her codependence with Phoebe, her unexamined expectations of their friendship, her emotional formation, and a fair amount of survivor’s guilt. James, her art farm mentor, greets her with an ages old pottery proverb: “But I think that beauty comes from the unpredictability of the firing. We spend so much of our time controlling what a piece will look like…but these artists have also proven their ability to relinquish control, and it’s that balance that’s beautiful.” Jade does not so much relinquish control as it is taken from her by way of trauma-induced hallucinations…or is it actually art camp magic? For me as a reader, this blurring of intent—am I intended to perceive this as magic realism or grief?—was the best aspect of this book. In the overall hero’s journey, I felt like the other main relationship arc was a little lost at times. Jade feels some interest in another camper, Mary, and while they find contentment, it seemed like Jade was going through too much for her involvement with Mary to be genuine and not done out of fear of letting another friend down. I’m not sure if my interpretation of this other story arc aligns with the author’s goal for the characters, so I encourage you to still peruse this new graphic novel when it releases on Monday if you are curious about how these stories play out! SLIP felt personal, and the art historian / former art school nerd in me loved the young artist conversations and trials and I think the authors did an incredible job conveying the power of art as an arena for contending with your demons.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Paige

    Disclaimer: I received this arc from the publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own. Book: Slip Author: Marika McCoola, Aatmaja Pandya Book Series: Standalone Rating: 4.5/5 Diversity: Sapphic person of color MC, Sapphic person of color character, people of color characters Recommended For...: young adult readers, graphic novel, LGBT, art, pottery, ceramist, mental health, comics, magical realism Publication Date: June 7, 2022 Genre: YA Graphic Novel Age Relevance: 15+ (attempted suicide, self harm, menta Disclaimer: I received this arc from the publisher. Thanks! All opinions are my own. Book: Slip Author: Marika McCoola, Aatmaja Pandya Book Series: Standalone Rating: 4.5/5 Diversity: Sapphic person of color MC, Sapphic person of color character, people of color characters Recommended For...: young adult readers, graphic novel, LGBT, art, pottery, ceramist, mental health, comics, magical realism Publication Date: June 7, 2022 Genre: YA Graphic Novel Age Relevance: 15+ (attempted suicide, self harm, mental health, language, anger, property destruction, gore) Explanation of Above: There are mentions of attempted suicide and vague mentions of self-harm. Mental Health is discussed, as well as anger about the situation. There is some small cursing in the book. There is some property destruction shown. There is a little bit of gore shown as well. Publisher: Algonquin Young Readers Pages: 208 Synopsis: Right before Jade is about to leave for a summer art intensive, her best friend, Phoebe, attempts suicide. How is Jade supposed to focus on herself right now? But at the Art Farm, Jade has artistic opportunities she’s been waiting for her whole life. And as she gets to know her classmates, she begins to fall for whimsical, upbeat, comfortable-in-her-own-skin Mary. Jade pours herself into making ceramic monsters that vent her stress and insecurities, but when she puts her creatures in the kiln, something unreal happens: they come to life. And they’re taking a stand: if Jade won’t confront her problems, her problems are going to confront her, including the scariest of them all—if Jade grows, prospers, and even falls in love this summer, is she leaving Phoebe behind? Review: I really liked this book! It did well to talk about mental health from the viewpoint of those affected by loved ones who are going through mental health crises. You really feel for the MC as she struggles to deal with the anger and heartache about her friend’s health and her inability to make it 100% better for her friend. The book is a summer camp book, revolving around an art retreat for the summer, so it’s perfect for the summertime reads. The book is a quick read as well with beautiful illustrations and I love how the use of color was in this book. The color red in particular was used to symbolize high stress or big emotional moments for our MC and it helped the reader feel how the MC was feeling during those times. The MC is also a ceramist, which I don’t think I’ve ever seen in an art themed book before. The only issue I had with the book is that I felt like it was a bit too fast paced, especially the romance aspect of it. I would love to see a more expanded version of this story come to play. Verdict: It was so good!

  21. 5 out of 5

    Alyson Stone

    Book: Slip Author: Marika McCoola Rating: 3 Out 5 Stars I would like to thank the publisher, Algonquin Young Readers, for sending me an ARC. This is another one of those stories that sounds like a good idea, but just ends up lacking in the final product. We follow a young girl who is at a summer art camp with the hopes of getting into her dream art school. However, she is struggling with her art. We see her have to work through this difficulty. However, this isn’t all that she is dealing with. W Book: Slip Author: Marika McCoola Rating: 3 Out 5 Stars I would like to thank the publisher, Algonquin Young Readers, for sending me an ARC. This is another one of those stories that sounds like a good idea, but just ends up lacking in the final product. We follow a young girl who is at a summer art camp with the hopes of getting into her dream art school. However, she is struggling with her art. We see her have to work through this difficulty. However, this isn’t all that she is dealing with. We see her having to come to terms with her best friend’s attempted sucuide and her own romantic feelings towards another girl. It’s a lot. She bottles up these emotions and really doesn’t know how to express it. She doesn’t know what she’s supposed to do about these feelings and is just really struggling with finding a way to make sense of it. This, I thought, was a great set up. This should have been the makings of a great book. However, I found that it was lacking a lot. The emotions that we were supposed to feel towards both the characters and what they were going through just wasn’t there. I mean, this is some tough stuff. This are things that teenagers deal with. However, the impact in the book was just missing. If you are going to have to set up for a story like this, you have to have something to bring it home. You have to give your readers something to latch unto and to have a reason to become fully invested. The reason was there, but the punch wasn’t. Had the author been able to deliver on the emotional side of the book, I think we would have had a much stronger story. You can’t have this great set up and lack on the things to make the story great. We need a reason. We need something to hold onto to. The artwork was there. Like with the writing, the artwork did set up the scenes fine, but was missing something to bring it home. In graphic novels, you are counting on both the dialogue and the art to bring it home. The emotions and the way the characters were shown to us just, again, didn’t have that punch that I was looking for. Whenever I am reading a story like this, with the high stakes, I want to have the emotions hit me. I want to feel the pain that the characters are going through. Sadly, that just didn’t happen. The bones of a great story are here, but I just feel like it is missing something. I feel like we need more of an emotional impact in order to make it hit the way it is supposed to. This book comes out on June 7, 2022.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melissa ~ Missy (FrayedBooks)

    read this and more reviews on Frayed Books: http://frayedbooks.wordpress.com What better way to kick off Pride Month than reading this new release graphic novel featuring a budding sapphic relationship while Jade is at an intensive summer art program! This was a fun read that dealt with some heavy topics. Trigger warnings: Mentions of attempted suicide We start this graphic novel with Jade receiving a phone call that her best friend Phoebe is in the hospital for intentionally hurting herself and read this and more reviews on Frayed Books: http://frayedbooks.wordpress.com What better way to kick off Pride Month than reading this new release graphic novel featuring a budding sapphic relationship while Jade is at an intensive summer art program! This was a fun read that dealt with some heavy topics. Trigger warnings: Mentions of attempted suicide We start this graphic novel with Jade receiving a phone call that her best friend Phoebe is in the hospital for intentionally hurting herself and attempting suicide. Jade is wrecked, since she and Phoebe had summer plans – Jade with her art and Phoebe with her music. Jade continues onto her intensive summer art program with the prodding of her mother and discovers the program is even more intense than she expected, preparing the students for college admissions. Jade’s medium is clay but she doesn’t have a real focus with her pieces, and that’s what she (and her teachers) hope she’ll make progress on throughout the program. This is a fast paced graphic novel and I loved seeing the art work Jade and the other students created! Art isn’t just about the piece created, but the meaning behind it. As an art major myself in college, I really appreciated the artist aspect of this story. I loved seeing the pieces Jade created! This story also has a magical realism aspect to it which I didn’t expect but found to be very fun and added another element to the story. Jade was never in a romantic relationship with Phoebe, but knows she likes girls. She becomes friends with a classmate named Mary and they slowly become more than friends. Jade is distracted though with her life back home and how Phoebe is doing, and has to learn the best way to help her struggling friend from afar while still living her own life. I really enjoyed the fun whimsical style of the artwork by debut artist Aatmaja Pandya. The majority of the story is tone on tone but there are certain pages/panels that are in red and that splash of color made those moments stand out. Overall I really enjoyed this graphic novel and I’m glad its now out in the world for all to enjoy! Recommend? I highly recommend this graphic novel if you want a story of a girl discovering herself through her artwork while struggling with how to support her mentally ill best friend from afar, and a sapphic side love story. It’s a coming of age story told through ceramics and I can’t say that’s a story I’ve seen before! Thank you to Algonquin Young Readers for the advanced physical copy and for having me on the blog tour! Frayed Books - blog | twitter | bookstagram | fb

  23. 4 out of 5

    Jam

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Before continuing I would like to give a quick TW for mentions of suicide Woah, where do I even begin with this. Jade is an aspiring artist who goes to an art summer camp called the Art Farm. Right before arriving, she finds out that her best friend, Phoebe, makes an attempt on her life. We follow Jade as she learns to cope with this and we see how her thoughts and feelings start to spread to her art. Jade learns quickly that when she puts her art, which vents her stress and feelings, into the k Before continuing I would like to give a quick TW for mentions of suicide Woah, where do I even begin with this. Jade is an aspiring artist who goes to an art summer camp called the Art Farm. Right before arriving, she finds out that her best friend, Phoebe, makes an attempt on her life. We follow Jade as she learns to cope with this and we see how her thoughts and feelings start to spread to her art. Jade learns quickly that when she puts her art, which vents her stress and feelings, into the kiln they come to life. How will she come to terms with all the unpleasant things happening in her life? Let’s start with the good, I felt that this graphic novel did an amazing job of showing how someone committing suicide can affect the people around them. The art was amazing and the emotions from Jade turned into my own. The concept of having the art pieces symbolize Jade's problems was done very nicely. It showed how if you don’t confront your problems they will find a way to confront you. Although, the other characters are where I felt this novel lacked. I felt the romance between Mary and Jade could have been done nicer. It felt rushed. All of the characters at the Art Farm felt rushed and I would love to get some more backstory on them. But overall I really enjoyed this graphic novel and will be recommending it! 3.75/5 Thank you Netgalley and the publisher for giving me this e-ARC to read in exchange for an honest review

  24. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    This is a young adult graphic novel about a young girl who is very into making clay creations, and she gets into an art intensive retreat. Once there, her goal is to build up a portfolio so that she can apply for scholarships at art colleges. What could be better than that? Unfortunately, the night before, her beast friend, Phoebe, attempts suicide, and ends up in the hospital. This is the same best friend who helped her find the retreat. How does one reconcile being at this fantastic retreat w This is a young adult graphic novel about a young girl who is very into making clay creations, and she gets into an art intensive retreat. Once there, her goal is to build up a portfolio so that she can apply for scholarships at art colleges. What could be better than that? Unfortunately, the night before, her beast friend, Phoebe, attempts suicide, and ends up in the hospital. This is the same best friend who helped her find the retreat. How does one reconcile being at this fantastic retreat where you are going to learn so much about art, while your best friend is somewhere back home, trying to recover. Jade is not allowed a phone, so she has to just think about that the signs might have been. What did she miss? She takes to sketching her, and then burning the paper, to release her memories. And throw in a little flirting, from Mary, one of the other artists there, all while Jade is worrying about her best friend. Can she fall in love, and still help Phoebe? The author apparently based the retreat on one she attended. Very intense graphic novel. The art is amazing, as well. Not sure if it will be in color when it comes out or not. Thanks to Netgalley for making this book available for an honest review. <'em>

  25. 4 out of 5

    Becca

    Thank you to Algonquin Young Readers for providing me with a review copy of Slip in exchange for an honest review! Content Warning: Suicide Attempt Slip is an LGBTQIA+ graphic novel centering around mental health, art, confronting your problems head-on, and learning that it’s okay to keep going. The time has come for Jade to head off to her exclusive summer art intensive, but right before she leaves she discovers her best friend, Phoebe, is in the hospital after a suicide attempt. While at this in Thank you to Algonquin Young Readers for providing me with a review copy of Slip in exchange for an honest review! Content Warning: Suicide Attempt Slip is an LGBTQIA+ graphic novel centering around mental health, art, confronting your problems head-on, and learning that it’s okay to keep going. The time has come for Jade to head off to her exclusive summer art intensive, but right before she leaves she discovers her best friend, Phoebe, is in the hospital after a suicide attempt. While at this intensive, Jade deals with the grief and feelings of guilt that if she continues moving forward with her life, she’d be leaving Phoebe behind. In terms of the heavy subject matter, Slip is a pretty tough read — at least in the beginning. However, as the story progresses we get to witness Jade’s growth & I think the lessons that she learns along the way are really important. There’s a magical realism bit that lends a hand in the growth of Jade, while also showing us the relationship between Jade and Phoebe; which ultimately helps us really feel for the characters and understand the feelings that Jade has. And, as mentioned above Slip is an LGBTQIA+ read! There’s a precious romance that I am more than here for! As I read a review copy, I’m unsure as to if the art style is finalized and completed. My copy still appears to be sketchy with very little color. If this is how the final copy will look, I think the style is very neat and fits well with the story. However, if this is not the finished look, I still get the jist of what they’re going for & can still vouch that the art style is still phenomenal & will be amazing upon completion, and can’t wait to see the finished copy. Basically to sum up my thoughts, A+ for the art that I’ve seen regardless to if it’s complete or not. I definitely recommend picking up Slip by Marika McCoola and Aatmaja Pandya. Very meaningful story and a perfect addition to your TBR!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Charlie

    Slip" has really beautiful drawings that perfectly capture the emotions and characters of the story. I maybe would have enjoyed it more in full colour but that's just my personal taste. Saying that, I did find the use of a different single colour for the magical sections really striking and effective. I would have liked a bit more development in the story, particularly for Jade's relationships with both Pheobe and Mary...I feel like neither of those had the depth that they deserved but I did enj Slip" has really beautiful drawings that perfectly capture the emotions and characters of the story. I maybe would have enjoyed it more in full colour but that's just my personal taste. Saying that, I did find the use of a different single colour for the magical sections really striking and effective. I would have liked a bit more development in the story, particularly for Jade's relationships with both Pheobe and Mary...I feel like neither of those had the depth that they deserved but I did enjoy the bits we did get to see. I particularly liked the idea of Jade using her art to understand her feelings and seeing her grow as an artist/friend. Loved the magic and descriptions of sculpture techniques, a really unique mix of ideas. Thank you Netgalley and Algonquin Young Readers for providing me with a free digital copy in exchange for an honest review.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Ness (Vynexa)

    Thank you to Algonquin Young Readers for providing me with an early copy of Slip in exchange for an honest review As someone who loves graphic novels, I'm always on the lookout for new ones. Especially when they are Queer. While this story is Queer, it is also so much more than that. Jade's best friend has attempted suicide, leaving her feeling every emotion a best friend can feel after an event like this has taken place: What could I have done? Was I not attentive enough? Was she telling me in her Thank you to Algonquin Young Readers for providing me with an early copy of Slip in exchange for an honest review As someone who loves graphic novels, I'm always on the lookout for new ones. Especially when they are Queer. While this story is Queer, it is also so much more than that. Jade's best friend has attempted suicide, leaving her feeling every emotion a best friend can feel after an event like this has taken place: What could I have done? Was I not attentive enough? Was she telling me in her art, but I just wasn't listening? Processing this while going to an art summer program where you can get a scholarship for college is a lot for someone. Feeling guilty while also trying to create an art piece that speaks volumes when you can't speak to the one person you want to has affected Jade. It won't allow her to do what she has always loved doing and lowering her chances of her dreams coming true. During this time, she develops a crush on a fellow artist, but her pain pushes her away. This is a heartbreaking story, it made me feel for both Jade and her bestie Phoenix. Feeling like you have failed as a best friend and trying to figure out how you can do better in both your friendship and your dreams... it's a lot, especially for a teen. The last panels, though...yeah, there were a few tears that fell. The art is simple, yet beautifully projects the story and emotions of the characters. While I wish the story was a tiny bit longer and the romance didn't feel as rushed, I do accept it and like it the way it is. My favorite part were the sections where it seemed that some sort of magic was involved. The panels changing color to reflect those moments– it cemented for me that I truly love when illustrators do that. Like mentioned, please keep the trigger warning for attempted suicide and talk of said suicide in mind if you're looking to pick this up. Will definitely look forward to owning a physical copy in the future. ⭐️ 4 STARS ⭐️

  28. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    I received a digital ARC of this title through NetGalley and Algonquin Young Readers in exchange for an honest review. The protagonist Jade has a strong connection with her best friend Phoebe, but when Phoebe tries to end her own life, Jade feels lost and unsure of herself and their friendship. Jade tries to forget her fears and focus on her ceramic form, however her fears only amplify into her art. With a bit of magical realism, the monsters Jade create are metaphors for her struggle with her ow I received a digital ARC of this title through NetGalley and Algonquin Young Readers in exchange for an honest review. The protagonist Jade has a strong connection with her best friend Phoebe, but when Phoebe tries to end her own life, Jade feels lost and unsure of herself and their friendship. Jade tries to forget her fears and focus on her ceramic form, however her fears only amplify into her art. With a bit of magical realism, the monsters Jade create are metaphors for her struggle with her own mental health. The art in this graphic novel is pretty raw and the coloring uses accurately depicts Jade's personal demons. This is an appropriate read for high school students that may be struggling with mental health or have friends in similar situations as Phoebe's.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Susan Ballard

    3.5 ⭐️ 𝐒𝐥𝐢𝐩 packs in a lot of emotions! It covers some heavy themes: suicide, self-doubt, and anger. But it also touches on the wonder of first love. I'm not an avid graphic novel reader, but the story seemed disjointed at times, but that could just be me! Yet, with bold, fun illustrations, a touch of magical realism, and topics that could spark discussion, this makes 𝐒𝐥𝐢𝐩 an important graphic novel. Thank you @algonquinyr for this gifted copy of 𝐒𝐥𝐢𝐩 from the Eisner Award-nominated and New York T 3.5 ⭐️ 𝐒𝐥𝐢𝐩 packs in a lot of emotions! It covers some heavy themes: suicide, self-doubt, and anger. But it also touches on the wonder of first love. I'm not an avid graphic novel reader, but the story seemed disjointed at times, but that could just be me! Yet, with bold, fun illustrations, a touch of magical realism, and topics that could spark discussion, this makes 𝐒𝐥𝐢𝐩 an important graphic novel. Thank you @algonquinyr for this gifted copy of 𝐒𝐥𝐢𝐩 from the Eisner Award-nominated and New York Times bestselling writer Marika McCoola and debut artist Aatmaja Pandya.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Caleb

    I received and ARC from my workplace. I absolutely loved this story! It was so sweet and meaningful. The message that it has rung loud and clear and it wrapped up in such a wonderful bow. It has beautiful representation and the characters have depth and the art is stunning!! I can't wait to see more from these two. I received and ARC from my workplace. I absolutely loved this story! It was so sweet and meaningful. The message that it has rung loud and clear and it wrapped up in such a wonderful bow. It has beautiful representation and the characters have depth and the art is stunning!! I can't wait to see more from these two.

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