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Judge Jackie Martin's job is to impose order on the most chaotic families in New York City. So how is she blindsided when the man she loves walks out on her? Jackie Martin is a woman whose intelligence and ambition have earned her a coveted position as a judge on the Manhattan Family Court—and left her lonely at age 39. When she meets Lou Greenberg, Jackie thinks she's fina Judge Jackie Martin's job is to impose order on the most chaotic families in New York City. So how is she blindsided when the man she loves walks out on her? Jackie Martin is a woman whose intelligence and ambition have earned her a coveted position as a judge on the Manhattan Family Court—and left her lonely at age 39. When she meets Lou Greenberg, Jackie thinks she's finally found someone who will accept her exactly as she is. But when Lou's own issues, including an unresolved yearning for his ex-wife, make him bolt without explanation, Jackie must finally put herself under the same microscope as the people she judges. When their worlds collide in Jackie's courtroom, she learns that sometimes love's greatest gift is opening you up to love others.


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Judge Jackie Martin's job is to impose order on the most chaotic families in New York City. So how is she blindsided when the man she loves walks out on her? Jackie Martin is a woman whose intelligence and ambition have earned her a coveted position as a judge on the Manhattan Family Court—and left her lonely at age 39. When she meets Lou Greenberg, Jackie thinks she's fina Judge Jackie Martin's job is to impose order on the most chaotic families in New York City. So how is she blindsided when the man she loves walks out on her? Jackie Martin is a woman whose intelligence and ambition have earned her a coveted position as a judge on the Manhattan Family Court—and left her lonely at age 39. When she meets Lou Greenberg, Jackie thinks she's finally found someone who will accept her exactly as she is. But when Lou's own issues, including an unresolved yearning for his ex-wife, make him bolt without explanation, Jackie must finally put herself under the same microscope as the people she judges. When their worlds collide in Jackie's courtroom, she learns that sometimes love's greatest gift is opening you up to love others.

30 review for Both Are True

  1. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I struggled to fully embrace the characters in this story. Yet, what Jackie and Lou were feeling with the outcome of Lou's choice is very relatable. I did not fault Lou for what he did. At points in our lives we reach crossroads. It is the "after" that helps to shape us on what we do with these choices. Thus, I guess you could say that I did relate some towards Lou. I think when it came to Jackie; she was so shell shocked which I would have been as well in her place but that she was not willing t I struggled to fully embrace the characters in this story. Yet, what Jackie and Lou were feeling with the outcome of Lou's choice is very relatable. I did not fault Lou for what he did. At points in our lives we reach crossroads. It is the "after" that helps to shape us on what we do with these choices. Thus, I guess you could say that I did relate some towards Lou. I think when it came to Jackie; she was so shell shocked which I would have been as well in her place but that she was not willing to show as much emotion as Lou. Thus the reason I gravitated towards Lou. The last third of the story is where it did all come together for me. It was a satisfying ending for both Jackie and Lou. I would read another book by this author.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jacqueline Friedland

    I loved this book. The author creates two very believable, relatable main characters, and then throws quite a pile of real-world complications their way, and it's a gripping ride to see how they wade through the difficulties. Part legal thriller, part love story, I would say there's something for everyone in this one. The author gracefully explores issues ranging from professional ambition to self-doubt and personal independence. I'm so glad I had the opportunity to read this engaging story. Hig I loved this book. The author creates two very believable, relatable main characters, and then throws quite a pile of real-world complications their way, and it's a gripping ride to see how they wade through the difficulties. Part legal thriller, part love story, I would say there's something for everyone in this one. The author gracefully explores issues ranging from professional ambition to self-doubt and personal independence. I'm so glad I had the opportunity to read this engaging story. Highly recommend!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Elyssa Friedland

    Poignant and funny, Both Are True is simultaneously a compassionate tribute to the complexity of family life in New York City and an intimate portrait of one unlikely couple–a love story you’ll think about long after you turn the last page.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rochelle Weinstein

    Reyna Marder Gentin writes compelling women's fiction with just the right blend of romance. BOTH ARE TRUE is the moving story of two lovers at a crossroads, and if you're anything like me, you'll be rooting on these perfectly flawed characters. Gentin captures the subtle nuances of relationships and what it means to open ourselves to others. Fans of legal thrillers will appreciate the courtroom drama, a testament to Gentin's years practicing law, and I, for one, appreciated the quick wit through Reyna Marder Gentin writes compelling women's fiction with just the right blend of romance. BOTH ARE TRUE is the moving story of two lovers at a crossroads, and if you're anything like me, you'll be rooting on these perfectly flawed characters. Gentin captures the subtle nuances of relationships and what it means to open ourselves to others. Fans of legal thrillers will appreciate the courtroom drama, a testament to Gentin's years practicing law, and I, for one, appreciated the quick wit throughout. I'm a fan. Brava, Reyna!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Mom_Loves_Reading

    Thank you @getredprbooks #moonshinecovepublishing for my gift copy of 'Both are True' & Happy Belated Pub Day to @reynamardergentin ! Not only does this book have a gorgeous cover, it also has 13 thought-provoking book discussion questions at the end & is perfect for book clubs. Plus, the book is just the right length & can be read in a day or two, which is something that really appeals to me as well as many other readers. 'Both are True' is a poignant & moving exploration behind the scenes of a Thank you @getredprbooks #moonshinecovepublishing for my gift copy of 'Both are True' & Happy Belated Pub Day to @reynamardergentin ! Not only does this book have a gorgeous cover, it also has 13 thought-provoking book discussion questions at the end & is perfect for book clubs. Plus, the book is just the right length & can be read in a day or two, which is something that really appeals to me as well as many other readers. 'Both are True' is a poignant & moving exploration behind the scenes of a young female, family courts judge & her life in NYC, the complications of being a career woman & carefully trying to balance her professional life & her complicated personal life. Told from the POV's of both Jackie & Lou, 'Both are True' touches on beginnings, ends & everything in between. It's a beautifully well-written, nuanced, refreshing & utterly engrossing story & in my opinion, perfection from start to finish! Fun fact: This book was inspired by the author's own work in the intense, emotionally-charged world of Manhattan Family Court. When it felt like it was time to try something new, Reyna left her practice as a criminal appellate attorney in 2014, enrolled in classes at a writing institute branch of a college, & turned what was a dream at one point into her passion: writing & becoming an author. Judge Jackie Martin's job is to impose order on the most chaotic families in NYC. So how is she blindsided when the man she loves walks out on her? Jackie Martin is a woman whose intelligence & ambition have earned her a coveted position as a judge on the Manhattan Family Court—& left her lonely at age 39. When she meets Lou Greenberg, Jackie thinks she's finally found someone who will accept her exactly as she is. But when Lou's own issues, including an unresolved yearning for his ex-wife, make him bolt without explanation, Jackie must finally put herself under the same microscope as the people she judges. When their worlds collide in Jackie's courtroom, she learns that sometimes love's greatest gift is opening you up to love others.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Susan Ballard

    Jackie Martin, an interim judge for the Manhattan Family Court, is under the watchful eye of the Judiciary Panel and feels as if her legal secretary may be after her job. With her focus on maintaining order in her courtroom, she is completely blindsided when her boyfriend, Lou, leaves her with no explanation other than a simple note. Lou Greenberg was recently divorced from Tara when he met Jackie. He was struggling as a columnist but had dreams of writing a novel. When he abruptly leaves Jackie, Jackie Martin, an interim judge for the Manhattan Family Court, is under the watchful eye of the Judiciary Panel and feels as if her legal secretary may be after her job. With her focus on maintaining order in her courtroom, she is completely blindsided when her boyfriend, Lou, leaves her with no explanation other than a simple note. Lou Greenberg was recently divorced from Tara when he met Jackie. He was struggling as a columnist but had dreams of writing a novel. When he abruptly leaves Jackie, it’s no surprise that he finds himself standing on Tara’s doorstep. Tara may not be sure why she let Lou back in, but she’s got bigger problems with her wild teenage daughter, Bryn, to focus on right now. After reflecting on why Lou may have left her, Jackie decides to open her heart to love. But the next time she sees Lou, they are staring across her courtroom from each other, and he is with his ex-wife and her daughter. Will Jackie rule this case by the letter of the law or by her heart and risk it all? 𝐁𝐨𝐭𝐡 𝐀𝐫𝐞 𝐓𝐫𝐮𝐞 is an engaging blend of courtroom drama, romance, and women’s fiction. It was nice to hear Lou’s side of the story, even though I disagreed with how he went about things. I thought the ending was heading in a different direction, but I was still happy with the conclusion. Thank you to @suzyapprovedbooktours and @reynamardergentin for an invite to the tour and a gifted copy.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Sokoloff

    I was not sure what to expect when I started reading, Both are True, by Reyna Gentin. The cover does not really help to link the book to a particular genre, ie, definitely not a historical fiction, not a thriller, and clearly not a romance. I have to say, all the cover reveals is that the story appears to include New York City. Curiosity got the best of me. I read the book, and I categorize Both are True, as a coming of age story, with romance and some court room drama! Jackie Martin is a lawyer I was not sure what to expect when I started reading, Both are True, by Reyna Gentin. The cover does not really help to link the book to a particular genre, ie, definitely not a historical fiction, not a thriller, and clearly not a romance. I have to say, all the cover reveals is that the story appears to include New York City. Curiosity got the best of me. I read the book, and I categorize Both are True, as a coming of age story, with romance and some court room drama! Jackie Martin is a lawyer who has just recently been promoted to a coveted position as a Judge in Family Court. At 39 years old, she is still single. Six months earlier, she was bowled over by journalist, Lou Greenberg, who she met outside the courthouse, on the day his divorce was finalized. The two have been living together for months. Jackie has recently been relying on Lou for emotional support, because family court is proving to be more demanding then she ever imagined, especially given, that she has NO children herself. Then, out of the blue, Lou walks out of Jackie's life, no explanation provided. He has his own issues to deal with. Then, life, being as unpredictable as it always can be, swings Lou, full circle, back to Jackie ... have they changed while they were apart? ...... I really enjoyed reading #botharetrue by @reynamardergentin. Thank you #netgalley and @moonshinecovepublishing for the e-ARC in return for my honest review. #5stars

  8. 5 out of 5

    Debbie Rozier

    About the Book Set in New York City, this book is told in two points of view. Jackie has never been married and is a newly appointed family law judge who is laser focused on her career. Lou does remote bookkeeping but also writes articles geared toward women. Lou is recently divorced and was a devoted step dad to his first wife’s daughter. Lou and Jackie meet under some unique circumstances and have been living together for 6 months but that all changes when Lou decides he needs some space to writ About the Book Set in New York City, this book is told in two points of view. Jackie has never been married and is a newly appointed family law judge who is laser focused on her career. Lou does remote bookkeeping but also writes articles geared toward women. Lou is recently divorced and was a devoted step dad to his first wife’s daughter. Lou and Jackie meet under some unique circumstances and have been living together for 6 months but that all changes when Lou decides he needs some space to write a novel. Lou moves back in with his ex-wife to avoid being homeless. Even though she is devastated that Lou walked out, Jackie focuses on her career as she is being evaluated to continue her judicial appointment for a 10 year term. When Lou and Jackie’s paths collide, both must take a deep look inside themselves to determine who they really want to be. My Thoughts There were so many pieces of this book that I enjoyed. I liked having the female and male perspectives telling the story and I enjoyed the really fantastic way the author develops each character. I adored the entire way the book is plotted out and without giving anything away, I felt that each character’s direction was refreshingly unique. I love anything legal, so the vivid description of the family court system was a huge bonus for me and I loved how Jackie’s cases are integrated into the plot.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Sally Koslow

    A thought-provoking legal drama, Both Are True asks hard questions and wholly engages the reader.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Natalie

    This was a lovely surprise. It is perfect for people who like novels with a little romance and a lot of well articulated women’s issues. Starting out as a story between two adults, living together in a seemingly fine relationship, it soon devolves into something quite different. Jackie and Lou have to deal with unexpected changes in their relationship and lives. Jackie is a family court judge, finding her way as she begins a difficult job, while Lou believes himself to be an author. They plan on This was a lovely surprise. It is perfect for people who like novels with a little romance and a lot of well articulated women’s issues. Starting out as a story between two adults, living together in a seemingly fine relationship, it soon devolves into something quite different. Jackie and Lou have to deal with unexpected changes in their relationship and lives. Jackie is a family court judge, finding her way as she begins a difficult job, while Lou believes himself to be an author. They plan on a life, without children and a shared future. There are twists and Lou makes a decision that upends their lives. As a reader, I liked all the characters. Gentin has managed to make every character sympathetic and attractive. Though this is not a traditional romance, it has a sweetness that will please a wide swath of readers. There is nothing cloying or hard to believe in this book. I really enjoyed this little jewel. Thank you Netgalley for letting me discover this charming novel.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mary

    Life has a way of falling into place, sometimes in a far different way than one might initially expect. Jackie Martin is an ambitious New York attorney, recently placed on the judge’s bench of the Manhattan Family Court. When her live-in boyfriend Lou unexpectedly departs and her docket becomes increasingly more challenging, Jackie is forced to make several important decisions that will define her future. Simultaneously, Lou must put the disparate pieces of his own life back together as he disco Life has a way of falling into place, sometimes in a far different way than one might initially expect. Jackie Martin is an ambitious New York attorney, recently placed on the judge’s bench of the Manhattan Family Court. When her live-in boyfriend Lou unexpectedly departs and her docket becomes increasingly more challenging, Jackie is forced to make several important decisions that will define her future. Simultaneously, Lou must put the disparate pieces of his own life back together as he discovers where he is most needed. Though there is no perfect answer, their lives ultimately guide one another to a new and brighter reality. Told from the alternating perspectives of Jackie and Lou, readers gain a deeper understanding of the complex emotions warring for attention on both sides. Throughout the novel, both characters make questionable decisions, occasionally causing the reader to cringe as they wait to learn what the consequences of these actions will be. Both characters are imperfect; each one has noble intentions, but the resulting actions taken are not always appropriate. Despite this, however, Jackie and Lou learn from one another and the choices they make, ultimately developing into more well-rounded people. Love is at the forefront of this story, appearing in multiple capacities throughout the narrative. From familial love to romantic love to self love, each level of affection is critical to every character’s ongoing happiness. The universal challenge of losing sight of the right path when love is clouding one’s vision is a recurring theme in this novel, and it is one with which readers will easily emphasize. Jackie and Lou both discover the intrinsic value of their connections to other people by learning from the mistakes they inevitably make; through their inner monologues and the effects of their decisions, readers observe and learn from the actions of these flawed characters. Well suited to a book club read, this story incorporates layers of emotion and human connection that will inspire introspection and conversation. Several discussion questions are included at the end to help guide readers’ thoughts after finishing the book, as well. Overall, the story is well-written and engaging, and readers will appreciate the thought-provoking nature of the book. Limited explicit content makes the story accessible to a range of reader sensibilities, and it is especially well-suited to readers who appreciate character-driven storytelling. This is an enjoyable addition to libraries for adult readers. I received a copy of this book from the author and I chose to leave this review.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lani

    3.5 Stars Jackie is a Family Court Judge in Manhattan and has life completely figured out. She's ambitious, career-driven, and orderly. At least she is until her boyfriend Lou moves out unexpectedly leaving only a note. Lou is newly divorced and a struggling writer who writes a weekly relationship column. He loves Jackie but feels stuck in a rut and longs to follow his passion of writing a novel. So he sets out on his own...but has nowhere to go. He ends up back at his ex-wife's house to regroup 3.5 Stars Jackie is a Family Court Judge in Manhattan and has life completely figured out. She's ambitious, career-driven, and orderly. At least she is until her boyfriend Lou moves out unexpectedly leaving only a note. Lou is newly divorced and a struggling writer who writes a weekly relationship column. He loves Jackie but feels stuck in a rut and longs to follow his passion of writing a novel. So he sets out on his own...but has nowhere to go. He ends up back at his ex-wife's house to regroup but finds himself longing for his old life with his wife and stepdaughter. This novel takes the reader on both Jackie and Lou's journey as they navigate life post-breakup. And just when they think they've got things figured out, each is presented with a huge moral dilemma when Lou ends up in Jackie's courtroom. I really enjoyed the legal drama/courtroom setting in this book. And, while I struggled with liking these characters, I appreciated their flaws and real struggles. Did I agree with some of their actions? Absolutely not. The moral dilemma presented in this book may have you screaming at these characters. And while I cringed at times, I was definitely intrigued with how the book would end. And, ultimately, these I appreciated how these characters developed and had some redeeming qualities. I liked this book and would certainly read more by this author. Thank you to the publisher and GetRedPR for the gifted copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Louise

    Both Are True portrays two vulnerable New Yorkers at a crossroads: on one hand you have Jackie, a 39-year-old female inexperienced family court judge and Lou, a 43-year-old underemployed male accountant/writer. Their relationship comes to a sudden end when Lou feels constrained in life and walks out on Jackie. The story is told in alternating chapters, from either Jackie’s viewpoint or Lou’s. I found the scenes in Jackie’s family courtroom to be very interesting and realistic. I didn’t really buy Both Are True portrays two vulnerable New Yorkers at a crossroads: on one hand you have Jackie, a 39-year-old female inexperienced family court judge and Lou, a 43-year-old underemployed male accountant/writer. Their relationship comes to a sudden end when Lou feels constrained in life and walks out on Jackie. The story is told in alternating chapters, from either Jackie’s viewpoint or Lou’s. I found the scenes in Jackie’s family courtroom to be very interesting and realistic. I didn’t really buy Lou’s relationship with his ex-wife after his split with Jackie, but his relationship - or lack thereof - with his ex-stepdaughter felt totally realistic. There are vibrant descriptions of Manhattan and the joys and woes of living there - subways, coffee shops, Central Park, etc. The author draws a big contrast with her descriptions of the Westchester suburbs as very dull (but good for finding roads for long bike rides). I really enjoyed her description of how Lou felt after his first long bike ride in a long time, without padded shorts. Another highlight for me was the existence of several Jewish characters who are comfortable with their heritage but not overly religious/observant. A minor quibble: Jackie’s parents are in their 70s, but the author writes about them as if they were a generation older than that. She says her dad always listened to Sinatra, etc., whereas people that age probably listened to The Beatles and The Rolling Stones instead. (I’m in that general age range and it was my parents’ generation that listened to Sinatra, not mine.) I’m not sure how to characterize this book, but I really enjoyed reading it. It’s not really a romance, so I guess you’d call it “women’s fiction,” a genre title I hate. Thank you to NetGalley and Moonshine Cove Publishing for the opportunity to read an advance readers copy of this book. All opinions are my own.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Ahh Lex

    Jackie, a family court judge, comes home one day to find out that Lou, her live in boyfriend, has broken up with her on a note (think sex in the city, Jack Berger post it note saga, IYKYK). The book then follows both Jackie and Lou in alternating chapters about where their lives lead them post breakup. This was such a unique book because the break up of Jackie and Lou happens right away, so readers don’t form an attachment to them as couple, but rather as individuals as they lead separate lives. Jackie, a family court judge, comes home one day to find out that Lou, her live in boyfriend, has broken up with her on a note (think sex in the city, Jack Berger post it note saga, IYKYK). The book then follows both Jackie and Lou in alternating chapters about where their lives lead them post breakup. This was such a unique book because the break up of Jackie and Lou happens right away, so readers don’t form an attachment to them as couple, but rather as individuals as they lead separate lives. Jackie had a very high pressure, successful career as a newly appointed judge, while Lou feels stuck in his career as a writer. It was interesting to read about how their jobs impacted their relationship with each other and their loved ones. Of course, Jackie and Lou come face to face again, but not in love. My heart hurt a little for Jackie, but I also felt she deserved more than Lou could give her. I was pleased with how much personal growth she achieved by the end of the novel, and I was left thinking to myself “I hope she’s happy”

  15. 5 out of 5

    Heather Frimmer

    Family court judge, Jackie Martin, is shocked when her live-in boyfriend, Lou, leaves unexpectedly, leaving behind a cursory note on the kitchen table. The break up rocks Jackie’s world, causing her to doubt her job, her attractiveness as a partner and even her self worth. Jackie throws herself into her job, but she keeps falling short of expectations. Though she is the appointed judge, she feels she herself is being criticized by her clerk, supervisor, amongst others, at every turn. If only she Family court judge, Jackie Martin, is shocked when her live-in boyfriend, Lou, leaves unexpectedly, leaving behind a cursory note on the kitchen table. The break up rocks Jackie’s world, causing her to doubt her job, her attractiveness as a partner and even her self worth. Jackie throws herself into her job, but she keeps falling short of expectations. Though she is the appointed judge, she feels she herself is being criticized by her clerk, supervisor, amongst others, at every turn. If only she can find a way to win Lou back, she thinks, then all would be right with the world again. When a member of Lou’s family ends up in her courtroom, Jackie is faced with the difficult choice between her career and her relationship. But maybe there’s a way to have both? If women can supposedly have it all, could there be a way for her to have her cake and eat it too? I always enjoy a novel with a moral dilemma at its core. I love looking at the choices, weighing all of the evidence and deciding for myself which way the scale tips. I rooted for both Jackie and Lou, even though they both made a significant number of cringe worthy choices. I even found myself yelling at them on occasion, trying to prevent them from going down the wrong path. Both Are True is an engaging story about love, lost and found, and about finding yourself along the way. The characters are real, flawed and easy to root for, and I enjoyed this peek through the window into their emotional lives.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Bookish Heidi

    I really enjoyed this book! It kept me turning pages and when I wasn't reading, I was pondering what I would do if I was in their situation 🤔 Told from alternating POV. Jackie is an interim family court judge and Lou is an accountant who writes a column for a Jewish magazine on the side for extra cash. Jackie thinks she has it all: the dream job, apartment, man, etc. Then Lou up and leaves one day without so much as a goodbye and she's forced to take a closer look at her life. Lou left to find hi I really enjoyed this book! It kept me turning pages and when I wasn't reading, I was pondering what I would do if I was in their situation 🤔 Told from alternating POV. Jackie is an interim family court judge and Lou is an accountant who writes a column for a Jewish magazine on the side for extra cash. Jackie thinks she has it all: the dream job, apartment, man, etc. Then Lou up and leaves one day without so much as a goodbye and she's forced to take a closer look at her life. Lou left to find himself after feeling trapped with Jackie. They both had things to work on and separating seemed like the easiest way to accomplish that. The paths they ended up on were so relatable that I couldn't wait to see where they landed. Such a great read!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alexanderia

    . The story was good, a little on the short side but enjoyable. The author was a lawyer turned writer and I enjoyed the main character also being a lawyer/judge. It had a very real and believable feel to the main character. I felt for Jackie, it’s hard to be the other half left behind when you had begun to think of that person as the one. I was satisfied with the ending and felt the book was a quick read. I loved all the tidbits of Lou’s background and the story involving his dad and the chalkbo . The story was good, a little on the short side but enjoyable. The author was a lawyer turned writer and I enjoyed the main character also being a lawyer/judge. It had a very real and believable feel to the main character. I felt for Jackie, it’s hard to be the other half left behind when you had begun to think of that person as the one. I was satisfied with the ending and felt the book was a quick read. I loved all the tidbits of Lou’s background and the story involving his dad and the chalkboard. There were several items in both of the main characters I identified with and it made the story fun to read.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Deepa Joseph

    A thought provoking book. It started off a bit slow paced but gathered pace later. At first I felt pure anger towards Lou for leaving Jackie especially as it seemed as there was no particular reason that he could pin point as the reason to leave her. But looking at the way, Jackie seemed to have accepted Lou’s decision (which is the right way), it seemed to have appeased me. Towards the end of the book, the reader is able to make a strong relation with the characters and we feel like having a li A thought provoking book. It started off a bit slow paced but gathered pace later. At first I felt pure anger towards Lou for leaving Jackie especially as it seemed as there was no particular reason that he could pin point as the reason to leave her. But looking at the way, Jackie seemed to have accepted Lou’s decision (which is the right way), it seemed to have appeased me. Towards the end of the book, the reader is able to make a strong relation with the characters and we feel like having a little more glimpse of Jackie’s and Lou’s life, mainly Jackie’s life.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Newman

    Reyna Gentin has given us a smart female character in Jackie, a sitting family court judge who faces difficult choices and makes questionable decisions. This is the second book in which the author’s real world knowledge of the law business shines (an earlier novel, Unreasonable Doubts, chronicles the ins and outs of the criminal justice system), and I’m calling it: we might just have the female John Grisham on our hands! Crisp writing and a few unexpected twists and turns; definitely recommend B Reyna Gentin has given us a smart female character in Jackie, a sitting family court judge who faces difficult choices and makes questionable decisions. This is the second book in which the author’s real world knowledge of the law business shines (an earlier novel, Unreasonable Doubts, chronicles the ins and outs of the criminal justice system), and I’m calling it: we might just have the female John Grisham on our hands! Crisp writing and a few unexpected twists and turns; definitely recommend Both Are True. I received an advanced reader copy for review.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Theresa

    This book has a little bit of everything - romance, courtroom drama, family dynamics. Judge Jackie Martin's job is to impose order on the most chaotic families in New York City. So how is she blindsided when the man she loves walks out on her? Jackie Martin is a judge on the Manhattan Family Court-whose job it is to impose order on the most chaotic families in New York City. She is in a relationship with a man who is not yet over his ex-wife and Jackie must put herself under the same microscope as This book has a little bit of everything - romance, courtroom drama, family dynamics. Judge Jackie Martin's job is to impose order on the most chaotic families in New York City. So how is she blindsided when the man she loves walks out on her? Jackie Martin is a judge on the Manhattan Family Court-whose job it is to impose order on the most chaotic families in New York City. She is in a relationship with a man who is not yet over his ex-wife and Jackie must put herself under the same microscope as the people she judges. This is a novel of self-exploration and being true to oneself.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Judy Stanigar

    Both Are True is a compelling women's fiction that tackles issues important to women such as the age old problem of how to balance career with personal life, what love means, as well as a love triangle. The author weaves seamlessly a courtroom drama into the love story. It makes for a very entertaining and dramatic read and brings the story to a highly satisfying conclusion. I highly recommend it and am looking forward to more from this author. Both Are True is a compelling women's fiction that tackles issues important to women such as the age old problem of how to balance career with personal life, what love means, as well as a love triangle. The author weaves seamlessly a courtroom drama into the love story. It makes for a very entertaining and dramatic read and brings the story to a highly satisfying conclusion. I highly recommend it and am looking forward to more from this author.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Klepper

    A compelling drama laced with loves lost and loves found, "Both Are True" is women’s fiction ripe for book club discussion. I feel fortunate to have had a chance to read an early copy of this wonderful book! A compelling drama laced with loves lost and loves found, "Both Are True" is women’s fiction ripe for book club discussion. I feel fortunate to have had a chance to read an early copy of this wonderful book!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Susie Schnall

    Gentin deftly weaves a story of a complicated relationship with fascinating legal insight, exploring themes of parenting, love, and all the difficulties and nuances involved with both.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    Although this was a quick read, it was a bit hard to connect with the characters at first. I did love the family court aspect and the last third of the book especially.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lisa Albright

    I love a great character driven story with lots of personal growth all around. It was so interesting to learn more about the behind the scenes of our judicial system and to understand how heavy the burden can be of finding the truth. I enjoyed all of the characters and thought they were very well-written and the story is thought-provoking and one that will stay with me. I highly recommend this book and I'm looking forward to reading more from this author. I received a gifted copy in exchange for I love a great character driven story with lots of personal growth all around. It was so interesting to learn more about the behind the scenes of our judicial system and to understand how heavy the burden can be of finding the truth. I enjoyed all of the characters and thought they were very well-written and the story is thought-provoking and one that will stay with me. I highly recommend this book and I'm looking forward to reading more from this author. I received a gifted copy in exchange for an honest review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Barb

    What happens when you have the opportunity of your lifetime to be appointed to a prestigious position as a Manhattan family court judge at the same time the love of your life, a man named Lou, suddenly leaves you and moves back in with his ex-wife and teenage stepdaughter because he feels like he’s living in your shadow? If you’re 39-year-old Judge Jackie Martin, you implode in the most dramatically disastrous way possible. The story opens on Jackie’s first day as a judge. In her first hearing, What happens when you have the opportunity of your lifetime to be appointed to a prestigious position as a Manhattan family court judge at the same time the love of your life, a man named Lou, suddenly leaves you and moves back in with his ex-wife and teenage stepdaughter because he feels like he’s living in your shadow? If you’re 39-year-old Judge Jackie Martin, you implode in the most dramatically disastrous way possible. The story opens on Jackie’s first day as a judge. In her first hearing, an angry and overwhelmed mother of two young daughters goes ballistic as the police and a social worker take her children into protective custody in Jackie’s courtroom. She screams obscenities and threats at Jackie who then finds her in contempt and orders the police to handcuff her and take her into custody. Her day gets even worse when she arrives home to find a note from Lou: “Jackie, I know this is cowardly. You deserve so much better. But I have to go. Lou.” As the days pass, it only gets worse for Jackie, personally and professionally - until it all ends happily for both Jackie and Lou, although not in the way you likely expect. Marder Gentin’s major strength is in creating complex, interesting and intelligent characters the reader will can truly care about. Despite - or perhaps because of - their flaws, the major characters are sympathetic and relatable as they go about their jobs and personal life as best they can. If you are interested in quality women’s fiction at it’s finest, you will love reading Both Are True.

  27. 5 out of 5

    LilliSt

    I have received a digital review copy via Netgalley and voluntarily provide my honest opinion. Thank you! 2.5 stars - Not a fan of the characters, who kind of ruin a premise with potential Jackie has worked hard on her career and is a newly appointed judge in family court hoping to impress her supervisors. She is in a relationship with Lou, an aspiring but not terribly driven writer, who moved in with her. However, one day Lou has an epiphany regarding his writing ambitions and walks out on her ou I have received a digital review copy via Netgalley and voluntarily provide my honest opinion. Thank you! 2.5 stars - Not a fan of the characters, who kind of ruin a premise with potential Jackie has worked hard on her career and is a newly appointed judge in family court hoping to impress her supervisors. She is in a relationship with Lou, an aspiring but not terribly driven writer, who moved in with her. However, one day Lou has an epiphany regarding his writing ambitions and walks out on her out of the blue, determined to make some changes to his life. Jackie in return is left wondering about Lou's reasons and starting to question her life decisions. I feel like this could have been a solid, entertaining reflection on the decisions we make in life and personal development, but it fell seriously flat due to unlikeable characters and a plot that I just could not relate to. To begin with, I was not a fan of the premise. Just walking out of a relationship without talking to your partner and just leaving some measly note is so cowardly and low. Lou's decision is apparently being triggered by his reflections how most of his friends think that he is gay (which would be terrible, right?) and make fun of him as being a kept man (gasp!) - poor guy. This really did not make me sympathize with him whatsoever. And the way Jackie reacts by clinging to every straw of hope to "win" Lou back, to take him away from her rival, Lou's ex-wife. I'm sorry, but are we in 10th grade, or something? I really disagree that this is how healthy relationships should work. Also, Jackie, despite working as a judge, displays an almost shocking lack of empathy in court. She also does something so incredible unprofessional and unethical in the second half of the book that I sort of could not believe it and found incredibly off-putting. In addition, I disliked basically all secondary characters (with the exception of Lou's daughter Bryn), who were at least sometimes jerks or plain creepy. E.g. Lou's ex-wife Tara calls him fat for gaining all of 10 pounds after leaving Jackie. Jackie's sister spouts gems like "Men don't like to be with women who are smarter than they are, or out-earn them, or who have more prestigious jobs. It makes them feel inadequate and weak." Oh, and let us not forget Mike, who works in court and who seriously tells Jackie, the judge, "I'm probably not supposed to say this - all that sexual harassment training they make us take - but you look terrific". Seriously?! I was also reather annoyed by the general superficiality of basically everyone in this story. I guess this is just a world I didn't really enjoyed spending time in ... In conclusion, I just did not connect to this story, but I can say that it was well written and easy to read.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Rajiv

    [Blog]::[Youtube]::[Twitter]::[Instagram]::[Pinterest]::[Bloglovin] If you want to read a story about the drama of two people who wish for stability and balance in their lives, “Both Are True ” is the right book for you. The author shines for how she portrays the characters in her stories. Having read her previous novel, “My Name is Layla,” I admire how the author adds layers to the characters. As you read her stories, you get so personal with the characters that you go through various emotion [Blog]::[Youtube]::[Twitter]::[Instagram]::[Pinterest]::[Bloglovin] If you want to read a story about the drama of two people who wish for stability and balance in their lives, “Both Are True ” is the right book for you. The author shines for how she portrays the characters in her stories. Having read her previous novel, “My Name is Layla,” I admire how the author adds layers to the characters. As you read her stories, you get so personal with the characters that you go through various emotions by reading them. Jackie shines in the story, and I liked reading the various challenges she faces. As much as I wanted to strangle Lou for what he makes Jackie go through, there were moments where I felt sorry for him. I also liked how Lou compared his history with Tara to the one with Jackie, and you get to see how his mind works. Similarly, the author also brings the life of the courtroom into the story. Since Jackie is a court judge, I enjoyed the side storyline revolving around Darlene Clark and Patricia Chang’s scenes. It was interesting to see how the difficulties of her romantic life took a toll on her professional life. Moreover, the author also adds some lovely family moments and talks about various topics like love and life. While I wouldn’t say I like characters who sidetrack the plot, this book is an exception because I enjoyed Jackie’s conversations with Mindy and cute Caroline. My only minor criticism of the story is the ending. While I enjoyed the realistic depiction of the end, I felt something was missing and did not get closure to the character. Apart from that, I liked “Both Are True,” and I feel the author has a beautiful talent for writing dramatic stories.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lainey Cameron

    The author’s legal background shines through in this unique story, told from the perspectives of Jackie Martin, a family court judge, and Lou Greenberg, an aspiring writer. When Lou rises one morning and leaves their relationship--without warning and a one line note—for the first time Jackie experiences doubt about her life choices. She’s a successful lawyer and until now has believed her most important goal in life is to make the best decisions for the minors she oversees in court, despite how h The author’s legal background shines through in this unique story, told from the perspectives of Jackie Martin, a family court judge, and Lou Greenberg, an aspiring writer. When Lou rises one morning and leaves their relationship--without warning and a one line note—for the first time Jackie experiences doubt about her life choices. She’s a successful lawyer and until now has believed her most important goal in life is to make the best decisions for the minors she oversees in court, despite how hard that can seem, and secure her tenure as a judge. But as Jackie questions choices in her personal life, it also affects her professional decisions. Several months after Lou bails on her, they meet again in a courtroom setting. Will a desire to prove her new found empathy, combined with a hope of winning Lou back, cause Jackie to put her ethics and career as a judge at risk? I found it interesting and original that throughout the story we also get Lou’s point of view, as he struggles with how to become a writer, find his own passion, and whether returning to the comfort of a relationship with his ex-wife is the best way to achieve his goals? All of which creates an unusual love triangle between Lou, his ex-wife and judge Jackie. A triangle which ultimately plays out in the courtroom. As a reader who enjoys books about powerful professional women, the question posed here fascinated me; can the professionalism expected of us as career women can stifle our compassion and openness to love? And if so, how far will a woman go to remedy that imbalance? The author has a flowing, provocative, and descriptive writing style, and I felt immersed in the courtroom setting. A fascinating sneak peek behind the scenes of life as a Manhattan judge; in the courtroom, the judge’s chambers, and inside Jackie’s head as she grapples with difficult decisions about who she wants to become. Fans of courtroom drama or television will especially appreciate this inside peek of judicial life! Although there is a love triangle element to the plot, this novel dispenses with the normal love story tropes. Ultimately,"Both Are True" addresses some of the most important topics in women's fiction; Jackie’s personal growth, and the age-old question of whether a career woman can balance what is expected in her profession with finding peace with her own humanity?

  30. 5 out of 5

    Melissa Levens

    Both Are True Author, Reyna Marder Gentin Pub date: 10.5.21 Thank you @suzyapprovedbooktours, Moonshine Cove Publishing, and author @reynamardergentin for my #gifted copy! Both Are True is a compelling women's fiction novel that examines what it means to start over, which always opens the doors for new beginnings. It is a thought- provoking story that explores complex relationships, the balancing act of professional women and their personal lives, motherhood, parenting, love, and legal drama. Jackie Both Are True Author, Reyna Marder Gentin Pub date: 10.5.21 Thank you @suzyapprovedbooktours, Moonshine Cove Publishing, and author @reynamardergentin for my #gifted copy! Both Are True is a compelling women's fiction novel that examines what it means to start over, which always opens the doors for new beginnings. It is a thought- provoking story that explores complex relationships, the balancing act of professional women and their personal lives, motherhood, parenting, love, and legal drama. Jackie Martin recently earned a position as a judge on the Manhattan Family Court and is finding the cases more challenging than she had expected. Luckily she has her boyfriend Lou Greenberg to come home to every night with whom she can share the complexities of her day. Lou works from home, Jackie's home, as a bookkeeper and also writes an insightful column for a Jewish magazine that is very popular with women. He is a supportive boyfriend who cooks beautiful meals and seems to appreciate Jackie for all that she is... until one evening, Jackie comes home to find that Lou has left her a note with very little explanation as to why he is leaving her. Marder Gentin's characters are perfectly flawed, but relatable and each on their own unique journey of self- discovery. A perfect book club choice as both Jackie and Lou are each at a crossroads and are faced with complicated decisions. Although I may not have agreed with all of their choices, I loved reading about their process, growth, and how it all came together in the end. Even the supporting characters- Mindy, Jackie's sister, Tara, Lou's ex- wife, and Bryn, Tara's daughter, all had perfect roles to play in this engaging and compassionate novel. For fans of realistic women's fiction, a little bit of a love story, courthouse drama, and complicated relationships- this one is for you!

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