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In the Land of the Big Red Apple

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Eight going on nine, Rose Wilder is beginning to settle into her new life in Missouri, the Land of the Big Red Apple. Her father is building their farmhouse and she dreams of the day they'll have their own bright crop to harvest. But before that can happen, she has a fierce ice storm to contend with and her first real Christmas in the Ozarks to enjoy. Eight going on nine, Rose Wilder is beginning to settle into her new life in Missouri, the Land of the Big Red Apple. Her father is building their farmhouse and she dreams of the day they'll have their own bright crop to harvest. But before that can happen, she has a fierce ice storm to contend with and her first real Christmas in the Ozarks to enjoy.


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Eight going on nine, Rose Wilder is beginning to settle into her new life in Missouri, the Land of the Big Red Apple. Her father is building their farmhouse and she dreams of the day they'll have their own bright crop to harvest. But before that can happen, she has a fierce ice storm to contend with and her first real Christmas in the Ozarks to enjoy. Eight going on nine, Rose Wilder is beginning to settle into her new life in Missouri, the Land of the Big Red Apple. Her father is building their farmhouse and she dreams of the day they'll have their own bright crop to harvest. But before that can happen, she has a fierce ice storm to contend with and her first real Christmas in the Ozarks to enjoy.

30 review for In the Land of the Big Red Apple

  1. 5 out of 5

    Katja

    4.5 stars & 5/10 hearts. The Laura books never make me cry, but the Rose books keep making me tear up! There are a few euphemisms; also the constant wonder about babies bothered me a little; and I was bugged by Rose’s crush on Abe. Otherwise, I really enjoyed it. I used to say I wanted more about Laura & Almanzo—these books fulfilled my desires! I love Laura more and more throughout these books; and somehow they stir me more, for I know how hard her life was and I desperately want her to have a 4.5 stars & 5/10 hearts. The Laura books never make me cry, but the Rose books keep making me tear up! There are a few euphemisms; also the constant wonder about babies bothered me a little; and I was bugged by Rose’s crush on Abe. Otherwise, I really enjoyed it. I used to say I wanted more about Laura & Almanzo—these books fulfilled my desires! I love Laura more and more throughout these books; and somehow they stir me more, for I know how hard her life was and I desperately want her to have a good life now. I’m just wolfing down these books—they are so good! There’s so much drama at times but also so much beauty, and so much humour... <3 I do know that these books are not as good as the Laura books, and there are beginning signs of why Rose turned into the woman she became. But personally, I don’t think these books are meant to be read as even part biography. It’s pretty much fiction and that’s the way they should be read. And when you read it that way, these are happy, sweet, & lovely books. But I understand that these books aren’t for everyone. Edited, these are suitable for readers 12+; unedited, ages 16+. *I do plan to reread these books next year to see what I think of them then; review subject to revision/updates*

  2. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I've been saving my reviews of the non-Laura Ingalls stories until the end of each series. I just can't seem to hold back with this book, though. The first two books in the Rose Wilder series was very promising. In fact, I liked the second better than the first one. Unfortunately, that isn't the case with this book. Truthfully, and I will be completely honest, this one was absolute torture for me to read. I actually considered stopping it when I got to the halfway point. I disliked it that much. Y I've been saving my reviews of the non-Laura Ingalls stories until the end of each series. I just can't seem to hold back with this book, though. The first two books in the Rose Wilder series was very promising. In fact, I liked the second better than the first one. Unfortunately, that isn't the case with this book. Truthfully, and I will be completely honest, this one was absolute torture for me to read. I actually considered stopping it when I got to the halfway point. I disliked it that much. Yet, I was determined to make it through it. I have owned this series for years and I never got around to reading them until now. And I want to read the entire series. I want to accomplish this "little" goal in life. But when something is as dull, and annoying, as this book was, I don't know if I will be able to accomplish it because the goal suddenly seems much larger to achieve. It was dull because the "stories" are just NOT that interesting. At least they aren't that interesting to me. Personally, I don't even see how a younger girl would be interested in any of it. It is annoying because of the way that it is written. I don't know what the real Almanzo and Laura were like. So, I guess I don't know if there is any truth to these characters at all. Based on Laura's stories, I highly doubt the "characters" that she created in her books would turn out to be the ones in this book. I will be completely honest again and say that if THAT is how Laura REALLY was, I absolutely HATE her! I am so tired of her being this stereotypical farm wife with stories to tell and having a bunch of morals to throw at her kid to show that she knows best (to lecture Rose that money doesn't grow on trees when she used the money that was given to her on whatever she wanted for a special day like Independence Day - was that really anything other than a little mean?). Why is "jiminy" the universal word there? Not only does Almanzo say it, but, amazingly, so do all of the people down there in Missouri. And he was saying it before he made it down there. I am not saying people didn't use the word. It just sounds "forced" for a person to say it. Even in a book. How many times do I have to read about the way their eyes react to a situation, the "crinkles" (or what it "wrinkles"? - I don't know - it is the same difference) by Almanzo's eyes when he smiled, and the "twirling" of his mustache? Why? Why do these things HAVE to be written OVER and OVER again?? And what is up with Laura blushing EVERY time Almanzo embraces her in some sort of way? By this time she had been married for quite a few years and had given birth to two children. I HIGHLY doubt that woman would be blushing when her husband gave her a kiss, in the privacy of their home, under the mistletoe - and wherever else it happened! GIVE ME A BREAK!!!! Now, I will read the rest of the series. Of course I will. Money was spent on them. They have been sitting here for years. I will read them. All I can HOPE is that they will get better, that they will be more like the first two books. If they aren't, I don't know what state I will be in when I get finished with them. I have read so many books that I have not liked lately that I don't know how many more I can take. January 2nd and I am already hating the first book that I read. That is such a shame. But onto the next! I will make it through these! I just have to keep telling myself that and, hopefully, I will do it.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Heidi-Marie

    I suppose it was good that I was reading this "side" of Missouri because my limited experiences there were NOT pleasant. I suppose it was good that I was reading this "side" of Missouri because my limited experiences there were NOT pleasant.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jaime K

    This book begins at the start of the Wilder's second year on the farm. Despite some challenges, including freezing rain and thus needing to de-ice the orchard, it's obvious that the weather is indeed better for the family. There isn't the EXTREME weather of the prairie. I like how Laura differentiates between rich-rich and farmer-rich. Rose's confusion is perfect for her age (she turns 9 in this book). Her jealousy and desire for Abe to stay nearby would also be cute because of the age, though it This book begins at the start of the Wilder's second year on the farm. Despite some challenges, including freezing rain and thus needing to de-ice the orchard, it's obvious that the weather is indeed better for the family. There isn't the EXTREME weather of the prairie. I like how Laura differentiates between rich-rich and farmer-rich. Rose's confusion is perfect for her age (she turns 9 in this book). Her jealousy and desire for Abe to stay nearby would also be cute because of the age, though it turns not-so-nice. Despite her youth, Rose finds herself between two worlds: that of an educated young woman (like the "townies") and that of a prairie/farmer girl. Her life mirrors Laura's in that sense, though she has friends in both and is a bit less stubborn about it than Laura was. The Wilders celebrate a first real Thanksgiving and Christmas on the farm. Everything with Christmas is heartwarming. We are giving a beautiful example of how giving can take away dark thoughts and spread joy. I think it's awesome that Blanche talks about motorized cars being in Chicago. It's also fun to read how bees were followed for their honey, and to make a beegum. Though, after readingAnimosity, I almost feel bad for the bees! I had to look up a few things: ~ sorghum (used for molasses) ~ fascinator ~ union suit The inclusion of the latter two continues with the LH focus on showing how fashions change with the times. I found the following pretty interesting: ~ People only paid school taxes if a child went to that school. ~ Abe says that his father believed that a farmer didn't need to read to harvest food. Laura agrees that used to be the case, but then argues that understanding how to at least read price changes and new trends had become more essential. We certain skills even now being more necessary, while other skills may fade. ~ Rose is still not allowed to move up to the Fourth Reader because of her age. I'm glad we allow students to move up according to ability, or at least provide more advanced opportunities among those of a similar age, if enough students can do it.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    This is the third book in the series about Rose Wilder, Laura and Almanzo’s daughter and their life “in the land of the big red apple”. (Which isn’t New York.) This is more of the same, as the earlier two books. Again, it’s just a series of anecdotes, little storylines patched together over a short period of time. Some of it is quite interesting- finding out how to “course” bees for example, or the building of their first “proper” house (larger and with an upstairs bedroom). But really, what I’m This is the third book in the series about Rose Wilder, Laura and Almanzo’s daughter and their life “in the land of the big red apple”. (Which isn’t New York.) This is more of the same, as the earlier two books. Again, it’s just a series of anecdotes, little storylines patched together over a short period of time. Some of it is quite interesting- finding out how to “course” bees for example, or the building of their first “proper” house (larger and with an upstairs bedroom). But really, what I’m discovering, is that reading these books makes you hungry! All I want is fried chicken after reading these. It’s very similar to reading the Enid Blyton books (pick a random one, any one, I’ll guarantee you’ll be hungry by the first couple of chapters), when all they talk about is midnight feasts and picnics. Again, this book takes place in what feels like six-nine months or so. So a lot of little stories, spread thinly across a short period of time. It starts just before Christmas and finishes in September or thereabouts. And what I’m starting to notice, is that the books always end on a happy note - for example, the final chapter is a wedding. (Not for Rose!) There’s no cliffhangers in this neck of the woods, and nothing really to make you move onto the rest of the series (unlike me, who bought them all.). These are easy and enjoyable to read, but very formulaic. You don’t need to engage the brain for anything here, and you’ll speed through the book in no time.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Christina

    At the age of eight, Rose examines her appearance versus those of her classmates who live in town and asks her parents if they are poor. Laura and Manley try to help Rose see that the family is not financially wealthy but are richer than most because they are farmers and, therefore, able to grow their own food. This short interaction is actually the basis for the rest of the story as MacBride demonstrates how the Wilders’ wealth changes with the seasons and their needs. For example, when Laura le At the age of eight, Rose examines her appearance versus those of her classmates who live in town and asks her parents if they are poor. Laura and Manley try to help Rose see that the family is not financially wealthy but are richer than most because they are farmers and, therefore, able to grow their own food. This short interaction is actually the basis for the rest of the story as MacBride demonstrates how the Wilders’ wealth changes with the seasons and their needs. For example, when Laura learns that Rose is walking to school in December with wet feet because her route requires her to cross streams, her father arranges to trade with the livery in town for a donkey to carry Rose to and from school. Not every farming family can afford to provide their children with a donkey, a sign that the Wilders are better off than most. I remember Rose’s donkey featuring more heavily in the book than it actually does, and I completely forgot about the lie Rose tells about Abe Baird and his sweetheart. I felt so much shame on her behalf and was, frankly, surprised at how gracious Abe and her parents were about it. But the story provided exactly what I was looking for – that warm feeling that comes from feeling like you’re at home. One thing I didn’t catch onto as a kid was the way MacBride really contextualizes his stories in history. The Wilders are strongly against William McKinley and refuse to sing “Dixie”, a song memorializing the Confederacy. Rose and the Cooley children at one point pretend to campaign in favor of “free silver”, even though Rose confesses that she doesn’t know what that means (and Paul and George tell her she can’t vote anyways). MacBride definitely takes a more political viewpoint that Wilder did in her series. In doing so, he also helps make it clear that this is a story with a particular setting and a particular time that can’t be romanticized as much as Wilder’s series can be (and has been).

  7. 5 out of 5

    Sherry Sidwell

    This is a review that by necessity must be full of caveats. If you're just looking for a continuation of the Little House books for a budding reader, they're very much in the same vein in the day to day of not quite subsistence farming and not bad at all. But if you've read Caroline Fraser's excellent Prairie Fires about the lives and mythmaking of both Laura Ingalls Wilder and daughter Rose Wilder Lane, you quickly realize this series like the original is a lot of romanticized and highly fictio This is a review that by necessity must be full of caveats. If you're just looking for a continuation of the Little House books for a budding reader, they're very much in the same vein in the day to day of not quite subsistence farming and not bad at all. But if you've read Caroline Fraser's excellent Prairie Fires about the lives and mythmaking of both Laura Ingalls Wilder and daughter Rose Wilder Lane, you quickly realize this series like the original is a lot of romanticized and highly fictionalized nonsense that could at times be quite hamfisted into trying further both women's own extreme politics and idealizing the heroic settler pioneer. Worse, they're written by someone who never knew Laura at all and because of Rose's decidedly odd proclivities in "adopting" various young men until they no longer suited her, lucked into getting control of the entire Wilder estate and copyrights. Third book in the series. Stuff happens. They're still struggling.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Squid

    First came across this book randomly at the library when I was lot younger. Not sure what it was about the cover that drew me to grab it......something about the combination of the word "Apple" hovering over a donkey must've really spoke to me. That aside, I'm giving the re-readability of this book an incredibly biased 10/10 because I LOVE LOVE LOVED the food scenes. I was obsessed with the honey hunting chapter when I first read it, and it still holds up now! Also love how descriptive it gets w First came across this book randomly at the library when I was lot younger. Not sure what it was about the cover that drew me to grab it......something about the combination of the word "Apple" hovering over a donkey must've really spoke to me. That aside, I'm giving the re-readability of this book an incredibly biased 10/10 because I LOVE LOVE LOVED the food scenes. I was obsessed with the honey hunting chapter when I first read it, and it still holds up now! Also love how descriptive it gets with certain processes such as making molasses, hominy, etc. and the descriptions in general about Rose's farm life are just really pleasant and warm. Despite starting out of order, I've decided to revisit this series so on to the next one!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jeanne

    This is one of a short series following Rose Wilder, daughter of Laura Ingalls Wilder, after they moved to an apple farm in Missouri. Rose is about 8 and the tone of the books is very similar to the originals. I don't know how much is fact and how much is speculation about various events, but it's a nice update to the original series. This is one of a short series following Rose Wilder, daughter of Laura Ingalls Wilder, after they moved to an apple farm in Missouri. Rose is about 8 and the tone of the books is very similar to the originals. I don't know how much is fact and how much is speculation about various events, but it's a nice update to the original series.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    4.5 stars I really liked the way nature was discussed in this book, as well as the shorter stories told throughout that gave us a picture of the state of the country through this one family's experience. I thought this was one of the better, if not the best, of the Rocky Ridge books. 4.5 stars. 4.5 stars I really liked the way nature was discussed in this book, as well as the shorter stories told throughout that gave us a picture of the state of the country through this one family's experience. I thought this was one of the better, if not the best, of the Rocky Ridge books. 4.5 stars.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stephanie Pieck

    The chronicling of Rose Wilder's childhood continues. In this novel, her family continues to work hard on their growing farm in the Ozarks of Missouri. Rose has new adventures at school and at home. A pleasant and informative read. The chronicling of Rose Wilder's childhood continues. In this novel, her family continues to work hard on their growing farm in the Ozarks of Missouri. Rose has new adventures at school and at home. A pleasant and informative read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Massanutten Regional Library

    Lianna, Shenandoah patron, July 2017, 4 stars: The story of Laura Ingalls continued through her daughter. It's very good! Lianna, Shenandoah patron, July 2017, 4 stars: The story of Laura Ingalls continued through her daughter. It's very good!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Bogormen

    Not as good as the Laura books. I'm not that interested in Rose and am reading them mostly for Laura and Almanzo. Not as good as the Laura books. I'm not that interested in Rose and am reading them mostly for Laura and Almanzo.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Reeda

    A must read. It tells you of a different way of life.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Minetta Slattery

    Another good book. Funny how life was harder then, but everyone was happier. Hard work, family and God. All little girls should read these books.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Emma Thingsted

    There’s a reason I always come back to this series ❤️it feels like home!

  17. 5 out of 5

    ScottPilgrimOTO

    The plot is predicable , but i love the villain Is very . I couldnt put is down

  18. 4 out of 5

    Story_Girl

    In the Land of the Big Red Apple Rose Wilder experiences new emotions and learns a few lessons about life, love and herself. It isn’t a very exciting book. There aren’t any major events that take place, no life changing or defining moments. It isn’t faced paced. It is just a pleasant simple read, but it builds towards more important parts of Rose’s life that are still to come. In this chapter of her life, Rose gets her first taste of what it means to give, to really give, self-sacrificingly and g In the Land of the Big Red Apple Rose Wilder experiences new emotions and learns a few lessons about life, love and herself. It isn’t a very exciting book. There aren’t any major events that take place, no life changing or defining moments. It isn’t faced paced. It is just a pleasant simple read, but it builds towards more important parts of Rose’s life that are still to come. In this chapter of her life, Rose gets her first taste of what it means to give, to really give, self-sacrificingly and generously. She also learns how jealousy feels as admiration, boardering on hero-worship, for her friend Abe grows secretly in her heart. She doesn’t understand this feeling herself but she does know that when Abe starts ‘sparking’ with Alva’s older sister, she doesn’t like it; not at all. When her jealousy makes her do something she never imagined herself capable of she learns about remorse, regret and guilt. We get see Almanzo and Laura’s generosity and caring natures and watch as Rose's friendship with Blanche continues to grow. A sweet, simple story for fans to enjoy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    The other John

    With a title like that, you'd think this book was some sort of fantasy novel, maybe one where a kid falls into a world of good nutrition or something. Well, it's not. Instead, this is the 3rd volume of the Little House: The Rocky Ridge Years series. The story of the Wilder family continues, describing life on their farm in the Ozarks and the events in their lives. It's enjoyable reading, though nothing outstanding. One thing I noticed in this one is some of the subtle differences between Mr. Mac With a title like that, you'd think this book was some sort of fantasy novel, maybe one where a kid falls into a world of good nutrition or something. Well, it's not. Instead, this is the 3rd volume of the Little House: The Rocky Ridge Years series. The story of the Wilder family continues, describing life on their farm in the Ozarks and the events in their lives. It's enjoyable reading, though nothing outstanding. One thing I noticed in this one is some of the subtle differences between Mr. MacBride's storytelling and Laura Ingalls Wilder's. The Rocky Ridge Years tends to read a bit less sheltered than the original Little House series. Rose's crush in this volume and the jealousy that accompanies it is played out a bit more than a similar event in Laura's life might have. There's also a better sense of historical context. While reading the Little House series, I couldn't have told you when the events occurred other than sometime in the 19th Century. (Well, save for the few times when a date is mentioned.) In Apple, you have scenes where the Wilders--children of staunch unionists--refrain from joining their Missourian neighbors in singing "Dixie" and where the town folks send campaigners for William McKinley on their way with some Democrat hospitality. Anyway, it's certainly worth checking out.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mary-Jane

    During fall vacation from school, Rose helps with the various farm harvests. The harvesting of molasses is explained, and molasses is used as sugar by the locals (as imported white cane sugar is expensive). Honey is also used as sugar, but is usually a treat. Hired hand Abe shows how to "course" bees to find a hive. The local rules say that whoever finds a hive may have the honey, even if the hive is on someone else's land. A big ice storm causes damage to farms and livestock in the area, and Ro During fall vacation from school, Rose helps with the various farm harvests. The harvesting of molasses is explained, and molasses is used as sugar by the locals (as imported white cane sugar is expensive). Honey is also used as sugar, but is usually a treat. Hired hand Abe shows how to "course" bees to find a hive. The local rules say that whoever finds a hive may have the honey, even if the hive is on someone else's land. A big ice storm causes damage to farms and livestock in the area, and Rose's family's apple tree saplings are at risk. The family works hard to break off the ice to save the apple trees, their anticipated future prosperity. Rose discovers that her rural friend Alva is illiterate. Rose continues to be bored at school and is often allowed to stay home to help on the farm and have her lessons from her mother and alongside Swiney. Rose's parents buy her a mule to ride to school so that she can more easily cross the creek. When Abe starts courting Rose's friend Alva's older sister Effie, Rose becomes jealous. She tells a lie, but learns her lesson, makes things right, and is forgiven. The book ends with the wedding of Abe and Effie.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Sarina

    The only thing that disappoints me about these books is Laura, now mother to Rose, has lost a lot of her spirit. I've always thought Ma was stern and solemn, but now I feel Laura is taking on a more bitter form of that role. Now, compared to Laura, Ma seems humorous and happy. I feel Laura is harsher on Rose because she sees so much of the parts she hated about herself in Rose. There was a time when Rose was speaking about the injustice of her new teacher and the pranks the kids were playing on The only thing that disappoints me about these books is Laura, now mother to Rose, has lost a lot of her spirit. I've always thought Ma was stern and solemn, but now I feel Laura is taking on a more bitter form of that role. Now, compared to Laura, Ma seems humorous and happy. I feel Laura is harsher on Rose because she sees so much of the parts she hated about herself in Rose. There was a time when Rose was speaking about the injustice of her new teacher and the pranks the kids were playing on him and Laura got really upset at her. But Almanzo was humored by the stories and reminded Laura of the time when a teacher was harsh on Carrie, Carrie was told to rock the bench back and forth because she had swung her legs. But Carrie was too small and tired to rock the big bench, so Laura sat next to Carrie and rocked that bench into oblivion so hard the school shook. Laura dismissed the story, however, said she was rambunctious and obnoxious back then and that she was ashamed of it. That upset me so much. She did end up laughing though, so that kind of makes up for it. She hasn't lost all of her spirit.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gale

    “GROWING HEALHTY APPLES AND CHILDREN” Written by the adopted grandson of Laura Ingalls Wilder this book chronicles a year in the life of young Rose Wilder. The family has survived their first year in the Ozarks, after their long move East from the prairie to a place they call Rocky Ridge Farm. In this 3rd book in the RR series Rose is almost nine, coping with conflicting loyalties to girlfriends (country versus town girls) and feeling the faint stirrings of jealousy. Throughout extremes of wea “GROWING HEALHTY APPLES AND CHILDREN” Written by the adopted grandson of Laura Ingalls Wilder this book chronicles a year in the life of young Rose Wilder. The family has survived their first year in the Ozarks, after their long move East from the prairie to a place they call Rocky Ridge Farm. In this 3rd book in the RR series Rose is almost nine, coping with conflicting loyalties to girlfriends (country versus town girls) and feeling the faint stirrings of jealousy. Throughout extremes of weather the Wilders offer a solid foundation of faith and charity toward their less fortunate neighbors. Continuing the girlhood mishaps of Laura’s own life in the little House books Rose amuses and entertains readers while learning valuable lessons about life, for human interactions remain similar regardless of geographic environment. Tenderly cared for by her devoted parents, nurtured in faith, hope and compassion she will mature and blossom as gloriously as the young apple orchard they protect. (October 21, 2010. I welcome dialgue with teachers.)

  23. 5 out of 5

    Tiny Mendoza

    Since I've read the entire Little House/The Laura Years & the first two books from The Rocky Ridge/The Rose Years last year, I've been itching to grab a copy of this book for a long time now. I seriously can't find a copy in bookstores or even online, secondhand or brand new (well except for Amazon, but duh I can't order from Amazon). But when I went to Manila with my aunt last Monday, I found out that she has the next two installments from the series! And the thing was, she gave the first two b Since I've read the entire Little House/The Laura Years & the first two books from The Rocky Ridge/The Rose Years last year, I've been itching to grab a copy of this book for a long time now. I seriously can't find a copy in bookstores or even online, secondhand or brand new (well except for Amazon, but duh I can't order from Amazon). But when I went to Manila with my aunt last Monday, I found out that she has the next two installments from the series! And the thing was, she gave the first two books to me when I was little. *Facepalm moment* Hahahaha! I really missed Rose! And of course Laura and Almanzo. The Little House books are one of my favorite childhood reads and I'm super happy that the adventure has not yet ended. I'm going to read the next one, On The Other Side of The Hill, so bye!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Paul Lunger

    The 3rd book in the Rose Years takes us through the end of 1895 & into the Summer of 1896. Through the events of this year we see the farm on Rocky Ridge have a semi-prosperous year as the Wilder family survives an ice storm, the holidays, & the building of a new house. Along the way we have the budding romance between Abe & Effie Stubbins & the jealousy with Rose in addition to following along the everyday hardships & daily routines of life at the close of the 19th century. MacBride continues t The 3rd book in the Rose Years takes us through the end of 1895 & into the Summer of 1896. Through the events of this year we see the farm on Rocky Ridge have a semi-prosperous year as the Wilder family survives an ice storm, the holidays, & the building of a new house. Along the way we have the budding romance between Abe & Effie Stubbins & the jealousy with Rose in addition to following along the everyday hardships & daily routines of life at the close of the 19th century. MacBride continues to show his knowledge of the characters & their lives as he once again keeps this easy to read story moving on without issue & continues to add to history of this beloved family.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Leanne Aurelio

    This is the first book I owned. I had it when we were strolling in the mall and there were bargained books placed in the middle of the Department Store. The cover really attracted me. And it turned out to be a really good story. It’s one of my favorites. I really don’t know why but I have this strong liking for farm life. :) So I searched for it online and I found in one of the previews their pictures and their family tree. Unfortunately, those weren’t included in my book. It’s really amazing to kn This is the first book I owned. I had it when we were strolling in the mall and there were bargained books placed in the middle of the Department Store. The cover really attracted me. And it turned out to be a really good story. It’s one of my favorites. I really don’t know why but I have this strong liking for farm life. :) So I searched for it online and I found in one of the previews their pictures and their family tree. Unfortunately, those weren’t included in my book. It’s really amazing to know that the book I’ve read is based on real life. In the Land of the Big Red Apple was in Rose’s years. I really wish I could read all the books.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Ashley Perham

    This book was mostly little episodes but connected mostly by Abe's courtship with Effie! I love how MacBride shows Rose's emotions! It makes you feel them with her! Also, I love Rose's unselfishness! And her donkey! I'm still trying to figure out what Spookendyke means in Russian. I also found Alva and Rose's tension interesting. Rose reminds me of myself. She doesn't really fit in anywhere yet. She's to "cityfied" for Alva, yet she's not as sophisticated as Blanche! Also, what was with the lie sh This book was mostly little episodes but connected mostly by Abe's courtship with Effie! I love how MacBride shows Rose's emotions! It makes you feel them with her! Also, I love Rose's unselfishness! And her donkey! I'm still trying to figure out what Spookendyke means in Russian. I also found Alva and Rose's tension interesting. Rose reminds me of myself. She doesn't really fit in anywhere yet. She's to "cityfied" for Alva, yet she's not as sophisticated as Blanche! Also, what was with the lie she told! I'm glad Laura mad her apologize because that was funny but what even!!! Anyway, pretty good book. I don't remember anything standing out too much!

  27. 5 out of 5

    Kacey Kendrick Wagner

    Lots of fun details in this book! How to find a beehive, how to make molasses, riding a donkey for the first time, surviving Missouri ice storms, how to move an addition off of one house onto another, etc. Those explanations are the best part about these books, in my opinion. My favorite story lines are Rose learning about the Spirit of Christmas, Rose & Blanche's friendship, and Abe & Swiney pretty much joining the family, and what happens when Rose tells a lie. :) Plus, Rocky Ridge Farm is doin Lots of fun details in this book! How to find a beehive, how to make molasses, riding a donkey for the first time, surviving Missouri ice storms, how to move an addition off of one house onto another, etc. Those explanations are the best part about these books, in my opinion. My favorite story lines are Rose learning about the Spirit of Christmas, Rose & Blanche's friendship, and Abe & Swiney pretty much joining the family, and what happens when Rose tells a lie. :) Plus, Rocky Ridge Farm is doing so well!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Emily Hunholz

    I still really liked “In the Land of the Big Red Apple” but not as much as I liked “Little Farm in the Ozarks.” It had a lot more internal monologue—Rose gets her first crush. It wasn’t too annoying, but it didn’t fit as well with the style of the original Little House series. Nonetheless, I still LOVE the Wilder family and can’t get enough of their stories.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    I love the rose series. I reread them all the time. I love how this book describes how the Wilders are expanding their farm. There are a lot of little adventures that Rose has. She gets to go to town for the Fourth of July celebration, she gets her own donkey, enjoys the Christmas spirit, learns how to find a beehive, and gets to go to a wedding.

  30. 4 out of 5

    NinjaK

    I'm enjoying The Rose Years, but the books aren't really distinguishable from each other the way Laura's were- each of hers had a very specific theme or location. It might be that Laura's travels made it easier to tell them apart, and Rose and her family living in one place is making them run together. I'm enjoying The Rose Years, but the books aren't really distinguishable from each other the way Laura's were- each of hers had a very specific theme or location. It might be that Laura's travels made it easier to tell them apart, and Rose and her family living in one place is making them run together.

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