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Static: Season One

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At long last, the most famous face of the Milestone Universe makes his shocking return! Bullied nerd Virgil Hawkins wasn't the kind of kid you'd normally find on the streets at a protest--but like everyone else in the city of Dakota, he was fed up. Unfortunately, the first time he stood up to raise his voice, the world turned upside down. The experimental tear gas released At long last, the most famous face of the Milestone Universe makes his shocking return! Bullied nerd Virgil Hawkins wasn't the kind of kid you'd normally find on the streets at a protest--but like everyone else in the city of Dakota, he was fed up. Unfortunately, the first time he stood up to raise his voice, the world turned upside down. The experimental tear gas released that day left some of his classmates maimed or dead...but it left Virgil, and others, with stunning new abilities. Virgil has power inside him now--real power, the ability to channel and manipulate electromagnetic fields. But there's anger burning inside him, too. What is he supposed to do about all of this? And first and foremost--what is he supposed to do about his bullies, now that they've got superpowers too? A dynamic creative team of new comics voices including writer Vita Ayala and finisher Nikolas Draper-Ivey join Milestone Media veteran layout artist ChrisCross to tell a new chapter in the story of the most iconic Black teen superhero in comics history. Like every classic Milestone tale, it will take you places you could never dream! Includes Static (Season One) #1-6.


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At long last, the most famous face of the Milestone Universe makes his shocking return! Bullied nerd Virgil Hawkins wasn't the kind of kid you'd normally find on the streets at a protest--but like everyone else in the city of Dakota, he was fed up. Unfortunately, the first time he stood up to raise his voice, the world turned upside down. The experimental tear gas released At long last, the most famous face of the Milestone Universe makes his shocking return! Bullied nerd Virgil Hawkins wasn't the kind of kid you'd normally find on the streets at a protest--but like everyone else in the city of Dakota, he was fed up. Unfortunately, the first time he stood up to raise his voice, the world turned upside down. The experimental tear gas released that day left some of his classmates maimed or dead...but it left Virgil, and others, with stunning new abilities. Virgil has power inside him now--real power, the ability to channel and manipulate electromagnetic fields. But there's anger burning inside him, too. What is he supposed to do about all of this? And first and foremost--what is he supposed to do about his bullies, now that they've got superpowers too? A dynamic creative team of new comics voices including writer Vita Ayala and finisher Nikolas Draper-Ivey join Milestone Media veteran layout artist ChrisCross to tell a new chapter in the story of the most iconic Black teen superhero in comics history. Like every classic Milestone tale, it will take you places you could never dream! Includes Static (Season One) #1-6.

30 review for Static: Season One

  1. 4 out of 5

    A.J. Anders

    “I’ve been told that anger is dangerous—Bad—And that all it leads to is trouble. But anger is just energy. Left unchecked and without purpose, anger can destroy. But we are not without purpose.” I stand by my compliments of the book (Ayala’s character writing for Virgil is great even if I don’t like this direction for him, Draper-Ivey’s art is stunning, and changing the circumstances surrounding the Big Bang was the right decision), but this isn’t perfect. Editorial needs to give these creators “I’ve been told that anger is dangerous—Bad—And that all it leads to is trouble. But anger is just energy. Left unchecked and without purpose, anger can destroy. But we are not without purpose.” I stand by my compliments of the book (Ayala’s character writing for Virgil is great even if I don’t like this direction for him, Draper-Ivey’s art is stunning, and changing the circumstances surrounding the Big Bang was the right decision), but this isn’t perfect. Editorial needs to give these creators more issues or the space they need to tell the story they want to tell, because on reread it is obvious something happened to this book. The final issue is a decompressed mess, some of the character arcs feels aimless and go nowhere, and Virgil torturing Hotstreak is just as stupid the second read around. Also this hardcover doesn’t just include the Static-only parts from the Milestone Returns one-shot like I assumed it would. Instead, the first half of the issue is just shoved in front of the main book while the back half is put at the end, and I’m just confused why? It was a pretty bad one-shot to begin with so it’s not like I’d recommend it to people in the first place, but why not just put the pages in that are important to Static’s story? Don’t just put an entire issue where most of what is in it doesn’t even pertain the Static story at hand. This is just annoying, especially if they are just going to do this in the hardcovers for Hardware and Icon & Rocket too. They won’t do that, right? I hope not. And I’ve mentioned it before, but I hate cover breaks in hardcovers like this, and it blows here. So some mixed thoughts on this hardcover collection, but I’d still recommend this for those interested in Static. It’s is a fine enough reboot for the character. I’m super excited to see what this team does with Shadows of Dakota (the upcoming Season Two) though, and the fact it’ll be more than 6 issues means this team might actually have the space they need to tell their story. Fingers crossed they can pull it off... This spiel was written after rereading the series in the recently released hardcover. The original, Spoiler-Free review can be found below: Static Season One wrapped today, closing out what is probably my favorite of the three Milestone Returns series, and while I did love it, for the most part, I have some minor issues. Vita Ayala, Nikolas Draper-Ivey, and CrissCross show a new side to Virgil Hawkins as we see him come into his own as Static across these 6 issues, unlike the original series where we were given his origin in a quick flashback in the second issue. Ayala takes their time developing Virgil, his family, and his side characters, giving them way more prominence in both Virgil’s & Static’s lives than they previously had. Virgil’s parents know he has powers and so do a good majority of his friends, which is way different from the status quo of just Frieda knowing in the OG run. They also changed his origin completely, which may not work for some, but as a massive fan of the original run, this was not a change that bothered me at all and I really didn’t mind it. Instead of the Big Bang being where experimental tear gas was released by the police during a large gang fight to quell it, in the reboot, it’s released during a BLM protest. The only thing that makes this a little iffy for me is explaining how characters like Hotstreak were at this BLM protest, because why would a racist white dude go to one of those? Besides little inconsistencies like that, this origin change is fine and undeniably more relevant nowadays. This story does something completely new in Milestone as well, with the government going around, rounding up anyone who shows signs of powers from this Big Bang, or as they are referred to as, Bang Babies. This leads to Static having to come into his own, so he can rescue these Bang Babies from the government black site, while also dealing with his school bully and arch-nemesis, Hotstreak, who has decided to start working for the government, selling the other bang babies out. Ayala’s scripting is thankfully strong, as I was a little worried about what their voice for Virgil would sound like, but they nailed it. There’s actually a moment in here between Virgil & his father that is one of my favorite Static scenes ever (which is saying a lot as someone who has read every single comic appearance of the character ever), like it really is such a perfect scene, but I do wish Draper-Ivey had gotten to draw it. Speaking of Nikolas Draper-Ivey, he absolutely kills it on the art this series, with CrissCross providing layouts and fill-in pencils during the first half when necessary. Draper-Ivey does take over fully by the end, showing just how strong of an artist he is. His style is heavily influenced by Manga and Anime, which helps the fight scenes significantly as he uses elements from both of those to help space out fights. The one between Hotstreak & Static during issues 4 & 5 is particularly a standout, and probably one of the better action scenes I’ve seen in western comics in a while. While I do love the art for the most part, if I’m being completely honest, it looks a bit rushed in some places, especially the final issue. There are like 4 panels in there where I could not tell you what the fuck is going on if my life depended on it. I also wanna touch on the speech Static gives at the end of the book because it is so fantastic, and you can tell Ayala genuinely believes every word that they write. It’s one of the best hero speeches I have ever read, and seeing Virgil come into his own was awesome. Stuff like this is why I fell in love with Milestone in the first place, and a moment as powerful as this was seriously lacking from Icon & Rocket. It shows that these Milestones titles are not only diverse creators covering diverse characters but equally about these said creators being able to put their own personal experiences and touches into these very human stories. Honestly, my problems with this series mainly stem from the parts Hudlin wrote and parts of the final issue. While I did like Ayala’s voice for Virgil, their decision to follow up on Hudlin’s choice to have Virgil torture Hotstreak in the hallways in the Milestone Returns one-shot just sucks since it is something Static would never do, and just so wildly out of character for him. Looking it up now, it looks like Reginald Hudlin 100% made that story decision, not Vita, but it’s still a really dumb thing that happens when it shouldn’t have. Stuff like this really does make you realize this is the New 52 for Milestone characters (tries to update and modernize these characters, but instead removes everything that made them themselves in the first place), and it makes the fact Hotstreak is disregarded later even more annoying. I am taking off a star since this shit did annoy me, but I won’t shit on Ayala’s entire story because of a shitty decision made by someone as braindead as Reginald Hudlin. I was disappointed with how Ayala seemed to bail on the setup for Hotstreak and Static working together to escape the bang baby facility in favor of a brawl with said bang babies though. The final issue’s solicitation and cover both teased that Static and Hotstreak would work together to free the bang babies and escape, similar to the Static Shock episode “No Man’s an Island”, but Hotstreak doesn’t even appear in the last issue, making his entire character and arc feel pretty pointless honestly. Why was he even in here? I couldn’t tell you other than to do fucked up shit to Virgil. I was just hoping for a more definitive Hotstreak story, especially since he really doesn’t appear in the original run as much as one would think (6 appearances), and I still think his appearances in both Milestone Forever and Static #19-20 are infinitely more entertaining than they were here in Season One. I’m also not completely thrilled all the Bang Babies shown in this series are ones mostly exclusive to the animated series. I will admit, it does make sense to bring in these villains from the animated show, but as a comic fan, it would’ve been nice to see literally any comic-exclusive Bang Babies like The Swarm, The Botanist, hell even Ribbert Jones or Brat-atat-tat would’ve been cool (yes those are both real characters, check Static #28 and #34 respectively for two truly glorious reads). Dr. Kilgore, John Tower, Blowfly, Bulletproof, Coil, Commando X, Laserjet, Snakefinger, Virus, Powerfist, and yes, even Jump Inc. are all pretty decent villains that have potential in the modern era. Even Boom Box, who was dumb as fuck in his Static #40 appearance, was pretty compelling in the Static Shock episode “Brother-Sister Act”. Static has a better rogues gallery than one would think, and I think it’s about time Milestone starts using them. They really aren’t touched too often, and in recent years Hotstreak and Holocaust are like the only two of his rogues to get any sort of prominence. I love the initial run of the comics, and I get the show was always more popular and people will know more characters from there, but something as simple as just a nod to literally anyone would’ve been nice. I would’ve even taken a Joyride reference for god sake. Every villain in here appeared on the show and has the same design they did when they appeared on it, which will probably only bother me, but damn I wish we got just something more for us comic fans. This is a comic book after all. I can’t be too mad though because it was dope as fuck seeing Puff. I love her so much. Besides a slightly rushed, weirdly paced conclusion and whatever the fuck Hudlin was doing in the one-shot, everything else here worked for me for the most part. While I did have my problems with it, this book is such a solid starting point for new readers of Static, I can’t even be mad. All of what I’ve said, along with some awesome cameos from show characters add up to create one of the most memorable DC reads in a while. The ending teases an awesome new take on a personal favorite villain of mine (even if he isn’t from the comics) for Season Two as well, and I’m so stoked to see how this character will be adapted in the comics. I loved mostly every second of reading Static Season One and will be double-dipping with the hardcover when it comes out. This is exactly how a reboot of a character should be done (Looking at you Icon & Rocket). Vita Ayala & Nikolas Draper Ivey have proven themselves to be one of the definitive Static creative teams, along with creators such as Ivan Velez Jr. and Wilfred, Robert L. Washington and John Paul Leon, and Yves & Fezzani and Jeff Moore. I pray they stick around for Season Two (They actually have been confirmed to be staying on for Season Two, so that’s good news.) I genuinely can’t wait to see Static again in the Summer of 2022.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    This was surprisingly well done. It's probably Vita Ayala's best work to date. It is a reboot of Static and the Milestone universe as a whole. Most of the origin story is the same, just updated for current times. Instead of the Bang Babies getting dosed during a gang fight, it happens at a Black Lives Matter student protest. Now the government is hunting down the kids that were at the Big Bang as it's being called. Static's powers are more or less the same. I di like how Virgil seems more intell This was surprisingly well done. It's probably Vita Ayala's best work to date. It is a reboot of Static and the Milestone universe as a whole. Most of the origin story is the same, just updated for current times. Instead of the Bang Babies getting dosed during a gang fight, it happens at a Black Lives Matter student protest. Now the government is hunting down the kids that were at the Big Bang as it's being called. Static's powers are more or less the same. I di like how Virgil seems more intelligent this time around and has the support of his family who find out he has powers. The art is solid for the most part. I do think it looked better when Criscross was doing the layouts. Nikolas Draper-Ivy is still a burgeoning artist learning page layouts and needs to lay off the effects on a page at times. Panels during fights can get cluttered and confusing. Still this was an excellent start to this Static reboot.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ashley Marie

    Excellent, and I can't wait to check out the new Icon & Rocket and Hardware. And the older Milestone stuff too, Blood Syndicate and Shadow Cabinet (and their upcoming reboots!). This, though, was wonderful. The art was gorgeous, so bright and colorful. The character and world have gotten a 2020s update, which felt good. Looking forward to season two, and definitely keeping an eye on Nikolas Draper-Ivey's artwork because 😍😍 Excellent, and I can't wait to check out the new Icon & Rocket and Hardware. And the older Milestone stuff too, Blood Syndicate and Shadow Cabinet (and their upcoming reboots!). This, though, was wonderful. The art was gorgeous, so bright and colorful. The character and world have gotten a 2020s update, which felt good. Looking forward to season two, and definitely keeping an eye on Nikolas Draper-Ivey's artwork because 😍😍

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michael J.

    This re-boot of the most popular Milestone character is both respectful to the source material and a fresh update to the series. Writer Vita Ayala ties the Big Bang event (tear gas of experimental origin used during a protest) to a student protest and mixes in current world events, cultural issues and concerns without preaching. She lets the story make its' points. What kept this compelling to me were the family interactions and Virgl/Static's relationships with his high school friends. That e This re-boot of the most popular Milestone character is both respectful to the source material and a fresh update to the series. Writer Vita Ayala ties the Big Bang event (tear gas of experimental origin used during a protest) to a student protest and mixes in current world events, cultural issues and concerns without preaching. She lets the story make its' points. What kept this compelling to me were the family interactions and Virgl/Static's relationships with his high school friends. That elevated this first story arc (hopefully) above the average super-hero fare. The artwork is equally engaging, although at times I had trouble clearly discerning what was occurring. The backgrounds are too dark in several instances. Still, the inventive Chris Cross on layouts with finishes and colors by Nikolas Drapoer-Ivey makes up a vibrant art team.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Wayland Smith

    The return of Milestone Comics' best known hero. Static's origin is reworked with updates that fit in perfectly. A great reintroduction a fantastic character. Let's hope for season two. The return of Milestone Comics' best known hero. Static's origin is reworked with updates that fit in perfectly. A great reintroduction a fantastic character. Let's hope for season two.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Dinges

    Wasn’t sure how much I’d like this going in but it was a really well done reboot

  7. 5 out of 5

    Emily

    Though I never read the other Static Shock comics, I absolutely adored the cartoon when I was young (and still do!). So I've been really looking forward to this fresh take on the character of Virgil Hawkins. In the TV show (and I assume the original comics), Virgil gains his electric superpowers after being exposed to a mutagenic gas during a gang war. In Season One, his powers come as a result of police using untested chemicals on peaceful BLM protestors. This is a contemporary spin on Static's Though I never read the other Static Shock comics, I absolutely adored the cartoon when I was young (and still do!). So I've been really looking forward to this fresh take on the character of Virgil Hawkins. In the TV show (and I assume the original comics), Virgil gains his electric superpowers after being exposed to a mutagenic gas during a gang war. In Season One, his powers come as a result of police using untested chemicals on peaceful BLM protestors. This is a contemporary spin on Static's origins that is timely and well-fitting. This collected volume starts off a little rocky with a crowded and convoluted introductory issue ("The Big Bang") written by Reginald Hudlin. But it stabilized once Vita Ayala's issues were underway, and I began to enjoy myself. I especially appreciate that Ayala seems to take most of their cues from the beloved television show, including some direct homages like Static's orange long-sleeve shirt in the last issue. I also really liked Nikolas Draper-Ivey's "afro-anime" art style, though the other artists that crop up through the volume were definitely questionable (Chris Sotomayor's depiction of Darius?? Horrendous. ChrisCross and Wil Quintana suddenly making Frieda appear Black halfway through issue #3 instead of the already-established White redhead?? Hilariously terrible.). I liked seeing all the characters I remember, including Virgil's sister Sharon, friends Richie, Frieda, and Daisy, and even the villains like Hotstreak and the Meta-Breed (got really excited when I recognized Puff). Darius is (I think?) a new addition, non-powered with dreams of being an investigative journalist, who functions as somewhat of a foil to Virgil. He's also Black and gay, and I think possibly being set up as a love interest for Richie, who is also already confirmed to be gay. Virgil's mother is alive in this series (as opposed to the TV show) and his father Robert is also present, though seemingly a much different character than the cartoon version (I definitely prefer the TV version). As for the story overall, I think it tried to cover too much ground in this first few issues when it would have been better off focusing on developing Virgil's character. Perhaps Ayala relied too heavily on readers already being acquainted with Static? I was pleasantly surprised by the extent of Richie, Frieda, and Darius's involvement in the plot, but wish they'd gotten some more development as well if they're going to play major roles going forward. The "G-man" bad guy was alright at first, but became totally cackingly villainous in the end; he would have been more believable as a "banal evil" kind of guy, imo. I really loved Static's speech in the last issue, especially how "energy" tied into it. "I've been told that anger is dangerous--bad--and that all it leads to is trouble. But anger is just energy. Left unchecked and without purpose, anger can destroy, but we are not without purpose. ...When channeled, anger can be the fuel to bring about great and positive change--it can build and protect. When directed, anger can be revealed to be hope." This was a fun trip down memory lane as well as an interesting start to a new Static series. I'm looking forward to more!

  8. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    While at a student protest, Virgil Hawkins and countless others get exposed to experimental tear gas leaving some heavily injured or worse. But others, like Virgil wake to find themselves with new abilities. The once quiet science nerd finds himself with the ability to channel and manipulate electro-magnetic fields and new challenges ahead. An electrifying (look I love puns, deal with it) comeback for one of my all-time favorite superheroes! I grew up watching the Static Shock animated series an While at a student protest, Virgil Hawkins and countless others get exposed to experimental tear gas leaving some heavily injured or worse. But others, like Virgil wake to find themselves with new abilities. The once quiet science nerd finds himself with the ability to channel and manipulate electro-magnetic fields and new challenges ahead. An electrifying (look I love puns, deal with it) comeback for one of my all-time favorite superheroes! I grew up watching the Static Shock animated series and this was a faithful but updated reimagining of the series. The heart of the show is still very much there but the characters have been modernized and new editions have been added to the cast. It will be interesting to see where the writers will take Virgil and what will become of Dakota City. I look forward to reading Season Two.

  9. 4 out of 5

    PJ Carter

    The art is beautiful, if a tad inconsistent. The story, unfortunately, feels like a faded highlights real of an actual story where everything is quick and easy. There are villains, but no other conflict. Virgin finds everything he needs in the first quarter of the book, immediately understands how his powers work, and has a cause and an enemy just as quick. I also feel that if I came in to this Volume 1 without any prior knowledge of Static, I would be totally lost. They basically just flash a d The art is beautiful, if a tad inconsistent. The story, unfortunately, feels like a faded highlights real of an actual story where everything is quick and easy. There are villains, but no other conflict. Virgin finds everything he needs in the first quarter of the book, immediately understands how his powers work, and has a cause and an enemy just as quick. I also feel that if I came in to this Volume 1 without any prior knowledge of Static, I would be totally lost. They basically just flash a dozen characters on the page and assume you already know them. All in all, I still give some padding just to see Static Shock content, but this is a pretty good object lesson for why comics get no respect.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jeremy

    I loveloveloved the original Milestone comics so much it was hard to imagine it could be the same with Dwayne McDuffie gone. It’s not the same, but it’s still excellent. The characters, the relationships and the voices of the cast feel vivid, distinct and real. I can’t wait for Season 2 and I very much hope Ayala is still writing it.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ada

    ***who sucked me in*** Omar of Near Mint Condition on YouTube in their 'Collected Editions in the December DC Previews 2021!' published on 17 september 2021 Static Shock the cartoon of 2000 is very nostalgic for me. ***who sucked me in*** Omar of Near Mint Condition on YouTube in their 'Collected Editions in the December DC Previews 2021!' published on 17 september 2021 Static Shock the cartoon of 2000 is very nostalgic for me.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Could not finish it. The dialogue was horrendous. Very little happens. Repetitive and borderline stupid. A really unfortunate blemish on the otherwise excellent Milestone relaunch. Please don’t let this book put you off reading Hardware or Icon & Rocket, which are both great.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ekene

    Reading this reminded me how much I loved the cartoon show and need to rewatch

  14. 4 out of 5

    Althea

  15. 4 out of 5

    Matt town

  16. 4 out of 5

    Tony

  17. 4 out of 5

    April

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rob Schamberger

  19. 4 out of 5

    Lindsey Fallon

  20. 4 out of 5

    Cassius

  21. 5 out of 5

    Jameson

  22. 4 out of 5

    Roman

  23. 4 out of 5

    Alicia

  24. 5 out of 5

    TJ

  25. 4 out of 5

    Astro_megazord335

  26. 5 out of 5

    Skylar Primm

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jessica Michelle Williams

  28. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Olsen

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jordan Fort

  30. 4 out of 5

    Paige

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