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Crip Kinship: The Disability Justice & Art Activism of Sins Invalid

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The remarkable story of Sins Invalid, a performance project that centres queer disability justice. In recent years, disability activism has come into its own as a vital and necessary means to acknowledge the power and resilience of the disabled community, and to call out ableist culture wherever it appears. Crip Kinship explores the art activism of Sins Invalid, a San Franci The remarkable story of Sins Invalid, a performance project that centres queer disability justice. In recent years, disability activism has come into its own as a vital and necessary means to acknowledge the power and resilience of the disabled community, and to call out ableist culture wherever it appears. Crip Kinship explores the art activism of Sins Invalid, a San Francisco Bay Area-based performance project, and its radical imaginings of what disabled, queer, trans, and gender-nonconforming bodyminds of colour can do: how they can rewrite oppression, and how they can gift us with transformational lessons for our collective survival. Grounded in the disability justice framework, Crip Kinship investigates the revolutionary survival teachings that disabled, queer of colour community offers to all our bodyminds. From their focus on crip beauty and sexuality to manifesting digital kinship networks and crip-centric liberated zones, Sins Invalid empowers and moves us toward generating our collective liberation from our bodyminds outward.


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The remarkable story of Sins Invalid, a performance project that centres queer disability justice. In recent years, disability activism has come into its own as a vital and necessary means to acknowledge the power and resilience of the disabled community, and to call out ableist culture wherever it appears. Crip Kinship explores the art activism of Sins Invalid, a San Franci The remarkable story of Sins Invalid, a performance project that centres queer disability justice. In recent years, disability activism has come into its own as a vital and necessary means to acknowledge the power and resilience of the disabled community, and to call out ableist culture wherever it appears. Crip Kinship explores the art activism of Sins Invalid, a San Francisco Bay Area-based performance project, and its radical imaginings of what disabled, queer, trans, and gender-nonconforming bodyminds of colour can do: how they can rewrite oppression, and how they can gift us with transformational lessons for our collective survival. Grounded in the disability justice framework, Crip Kinship investigates the revolutionary survival teachings that disabled, queer of colour community offers to all our bodyminds. From their focus on crip beauty and sexuality to manifesting digital kinship networks and crip-centric liberated zones, Sins Invalid empowers and moves us toward generating our collective liberation from our bodyminds outward.

30 review for Crip Kinship: The Disability Justice & Art Activism of Sins Invalid

  1. 5 out of 5

    Danika at The Lesbrary

    This is a history of Sins Invalid, a disability justice performance project founded in 2006 in San Francisco. It explains how they got started, but more than just recounting, it explores the ideas behind Sins Invalid and why it became such an important outlet for people. It discusses how the mainstream disability rights movement as well as disability studies as an academic framework centre white disabled activists. This is part history, part manifesto, bringing in so many different voices. I espe This is a history of Sins Invalid, a disability justice performance project founded in 2006 in San Francisco. It explains how they got started, but more than just recounting, it explores the ideas behind Sins Invalid and why it became such an important outlet for people. It discusses how the mainstream disability rights movement as well as disability studies as an academic framework centre white disabled activists. This is part history, part manifesto, bringing in so many different voices. I especially liked a chapter that discussed how Sins Invalid reclaims beauty for disabled bodyminds, but also gives space for another disability justice perspective that beauty is an unsalvageable concept based in restriction and oppression, and that it is more freeing to reclaim Ugly as a concept. I highly, highly recommend this and Care Work to anyone and everyone. It left me with a lot to think about, and I can’t wait to learn more. Full review at the Lesbrary.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hannah Silver

    Glad to know about all of Sins Invalid's work and ethos. The writing style was a little weird for me at times, but registers as heartfelt. Glad to know about all of Sins Invalid's work and ethos. The writing style was a little weird for me at times, but registers as heartfelt.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kora Schultz-Dzbinski

    "we are storytellers. we are protest. we are crip kinship networks vast, bold, and soft." ending the year with this book was an exhale, for a breath i didn't realize i was holding. another world is possible. i love you all so much. "we are storytellers. we are protest. we are crip kinship networks vast, bold, and soft." ending the year with this book was an exhale, for a breath i didn't realize i was holding. another world is possible. i love you all so much.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jen (Remembered Reads)

    Crip Kinship provides a fantastic overview of the Disability Justice performance project Sins Invalid. With an examination of the concept of storytelling as active followed by descriptions of certain performances (many of which are available in whole or in part on YouTube for those interested), it's a great introduction for anyone new to the project or people wanting to look back on the project so far. It is written in a style that is a bit jargon-heavy, and sometimes the use of language leans to Crip Kinship provides a fantastic overview of the Disability Justice performance project Sins Invalid. With an examination of the concept of storytelling as active followed by descriptions of certain performances (many of which are available in whole or in part on YouTube for those interested), it's a great introduction for anyone new to the project or people wanting to look back on the project so far. It is written in a style that is a bit jargon-heavy, and sometimes the use of language leans towards the poetic, which can be lovely but also makes it somewhat less broadly accessible than a more straightforward style might have been. Some audiences will benefit from having their ideas of how language "should" be used challenged, but others will almost definitely come away confused. But of course that's always going to be a challenging balancing act when it comes to storytelling in this style. The one thing I wished had more focus was the few notes on things that could have been done better. There are passing mentions of things like an intern mentioning that an event wasn't accessible to neurodivergent attendees, or one individual being dragged into acting as a secretary for another - but there's never enough detail for anyone working on their own art/activism project to take away tips for avoiding the same issues. Still, if you're interested in Sins Invalid (or just Disability Justice or just performance as activism) it's well worth picking up.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Laura Sackton

    Read my review of this brilliant and generous book here: https://booksandbakes.substack.com/p/... Read my review of this brilliant and generous book here: https://booksandbakes.substack.com/p/...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ryley K

    An excellent introduction text to disability justice and movement work.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Barbara McVeigh

    4.5 “Welcome to our queendom, kingdom, queerdom, multibodied universe…Tonight, we will be new maps of celestial beings…” page 137.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Ellice Patterson

    Amazing didn't want it to end Amazing didn't want it to end

  9. 5 out of 5

    Hilary

    Thank you Arsenal Pulp for an ebook of Shayda Kafai's Crip Kinship: The Disability Justice & Art Activism of Sins Invalid, out in November ♥️ In 2005, queer disabled activists of color came together to name Disability Justice. A year later, Sins Invalid began as a crip-led performance project of resistance, one that centralizes artists that have been historically marginalized, particularly by the mainstream and single-issue disability rights movement. Using art activism, Sins Invalid creates spac Thank you Arsenal Pulp for an ebook of Shayda Kafai's Crip Kinship: The Disability Justice & Art Activism of Sins Invalid, out in November ♥️ In 2005, queer disabled activists of color came together to name Disability Justice. A year later, Sins Invalid began as a crip-led performance project of resistance, one that centralizes artists that have been historically marginalized, particularly by the mainstream and single-issue disability rights movement. Using art activism, Sins Invalid creates spaces of healing, where crip bodyminds can be free and recognized. They use radical storytelling as a way to resist an ableist world and reimagine new ones. Slow down, rest, Shayda writes to us. This book is meant to be savored, loved as deeply as it loves you. Thank you for your radical storytelling, Shayda, in writing this book, and for documenting these histories so that they may be told to and shared with generations of our disabled communities. Full review: https://www.instagram.com/p/CUsX3iwFwH_/

  10. 4 out of 5

    Moon

  11. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Elayne

  12. 4 out of 5

    Clare Baines

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joyce Amen

  14. 5 out of 5

    Joy Messinger

  15. 4 out of 5

    Megan

  16. 5 out of 5

    Annie MacKillican

  17. 4 out of 5

    Libby

  18. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

  19. 5 out of 5

    Tina

  20. 5 out of 5

    Emma

  21. 4 out of 5

    Frances

  22. 5 out of 5

    Zaynab

  23. 4 out of 5

    Pamela Block

  24. 4 out of 5

    Christie

  25. 4 out of 5

    niles

  26. 5 out of 5

    tinyflower.reads

  27. 5 out of 5

    Amy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Kira

  29. 4 out of 5

    Cierra

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amanda Tolentino

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